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Showing posts from April, 2014

New York Central at Schenectady in 1870s

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Old Skaneateles Railroad Timetable

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Eastbound Black Diamond at Ithaca, 1959

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Black Diamond Express at Mauch Chunk, Pa.

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Scene taken about 1905.                

When Horsecars 'Reined' in Syracuse

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Horsecar on Shonnard Street in Syracuse in the 1890s.









Sam Sloan Ruled the D., L. & W. Railroad

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By Richard Palmer
     Samuel Sloan, was without a doubt one of the most capable railroad capitalists  of the 19th century. He was born on Dec. 25, 1817 to William and Elizabeth (Simpson) Sloan of Lisburn, County Down, Ireland. When he was a year old he was brought by his parents to New York. At age 14, the death of his father compelled Samuel to withdraw from the Columbia College Preparatory School, and he found employment in an importing house on Cedar Street, with which he remained connected for twenty-five years, becoming head of the firm.     On April 8, 1844, he was married, in New Brunswick, N.J., to Margaret Elmendorf, and took up his residence in Brooklyn. He was chosen a supervisor of Kings County in 1852, and served as president of the Long Island College Hospital. In 1857, having retired from the importing business, he was elected as a Democrat to the state Senate, of which he was a member for two years.     Sloan at 40 was recognized in New York as a succe…

No Sunday Trains Ran on the D.L.& W.

By Richard Palmer    It is common knowledge Sam Sloan ruled the D.L. & W. with an iron hand.  Also, during his long regime stretching over more than three decades, not a train moved on Sunday. No amount of pleading or petitioning could change his mind, and this is fairly well documented.      " A large number of Philadelphia excursionists who arrived in town by the D.L.& W. R.R. Saturday morning, and who lived on the line of the Oswego road, were obliged to remain over till this morning. The D.L. & W. road runs no Sunday trains." --- Syracuse Standard, Oct. 23, 1876     "Sam Sloan was a man of marked characteristics. Not the least of these was his sturdy Presbyterianism. It was he who made the Lackawanna conspicuous during his administration because of its having no Sunday trains. "I would not work myself on Sunday," was his explanation, "and I do not see why the men under me should be made to work on Sunday.&…

Sam Sloan Ruled the Lackawanna Railroad

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By Richard Palmer
     Samuel Sloan, was without a doubt one of the most capable railroad capitalists  of the 19th century. He was born on Dec. 25, 1817 to William and Elizabeth (Simpson) Sloan of Lisburn, County Down, Ireland. When he was a year old he was brought by his parents to New York. At age 14, the death of his father compelled Samuel to withdraw from the Columbia College Preparatory School, and he found employment in an importing house on Cedar Street, with which he remained connected for twenty-five years, becoming head of the firm. On April 8, 1844, he was married, in New Brunswick, N.J., to Margaret Elmendorf, and took up his residence in Brooklyn. He was chosen a supervisor of Kings County in 1852, and served as president of the Long Island College Hospital. In 1857, having retired from the importing business, he was elected as a Democrat to the state Senate, of which he was a member for two years…