Monday, May 2, 2016

New York & Oswego Midland Auburn Branch





   One of the most interesting segments of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad was the Auburn Branch which meandered westward over hill and dale through the countryside some 85 miles from Norwich to Scipio Summit, south of Auburn. It passed through such places as Plymouth, Beaver Meadow, Otselic Center, DeRuyter, and on to Cortland. It operated via trackage rights over the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad from Cortland to Freeville, then struck out on its own in a northwest direction.
  This “Western Extension” was originally intended to be built to Buffalo  Ultimately the Midland went into the hands of receivers on September 19, 1873. A multitude of both financial and operating problems resulted in the entire line being shut down on February 27, 1875 for several months. The Auburn branch was also closed down until April 1, 1875 when the UI&E RR leased and operated it for a year, until May 1, 1876, when the Midland was able to resume operation on its own.
   Since 1872, the U.I. & E. also had trackage rights over the Midland between Cortland and DeRuyter and apparently saw an opportunity to extend its horizons to Norwich. It already had made an important connection with the New York Central at Canastota through acquisition of the Cazenovia, Canastota & DeRuyter Railroad. 
  Some improvements were made between Norwich and DeRuyter and by early April, 1875, the U.I.& E. was operating two daily eastbound passenger trains between Cortland and Norwich; one morning train between DeRuyter and Cortland and an evening westbound train from Norwich to Cortland. 
  Since the U.I. & E. only operated the line between DeRuyter and Norwich for a year, it does not appear it gave serious consideration to purchasing it. In fact, it was rumored they wanted to rip up the line east of DeRuyter and build a new line through Georgetown to Randallsville. This was never done, however, and the Midland continued sporadic service between Norwich and Cortland until 1880.
   Norwich to DeRuyter was dismantled in 1882. The 19 1/2 miles from DeRuyter to Cortland was preserved through leases until it was purchased outright by the Elmira, Cortland & Northern Railroad which was the immediate antecedent of the Lehigh Valley. The so-called "western extension" between Freeville and Scipio Summit was operated under lease by the UI&E between 1873 and 1876 when it was sold to the newly-organized Ithaca, Auburn & Western. This line was extended to Auburn in 1889, but only lasted three years, and was abandoned in 1891. Items are excerpted from local newspapers of the day and other sources.
                                                   _____________
  Newspaper Articles Concerning the Auburn Branch
                    New York & Oswego Midland Railroad
    (Note: Chenango Telegraph and Chenango Union were of Norwich)
                            Compiled by Richard F. Palmer

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., May 23, 1866
                                                            
               Railroad Meeting at Plymouth
                        ____
                                               May 17, 1866
    A goodly number of the citizens of this town assembled at the Congregational Church last evening for the purpose of hearing discussed the subject of the New York & Oswego Midland R.R.  The meeting was organized by Col. Benadam Frink as Chairman and Charles W. Scott, Secretary.
    Engineer Powell was present and spoke of the feasibility of the proposed route. Lieut. Gov. Alvord was then introduced and spoke of the growth and advancement of other portions of our State, in population and wealth - he said we might enjoy the same prosperity had we equal means of internal communication.
    Senator Low followed, speaking of the Road as an investment, and the many benefits to be derived from it.
    The Hon. D.C. Littlejohn was introduced and spoke of the demand for the Road, the advantages of the proposed road over the roads which now exist, and explained to the people that if they bond the town for the construction f the Road, they are not in reality creating a debt, but simply loaning their credit. 
    Capt. Gordon spoke earnestly in favor of the Road. B. Gage Barry, Esq. , said to the people that at a previous meeting the faith of the town was pledged for $150,000, now the Directors only asked for $100,000. The Commissi
oners were present and an opportunity was given for those present to sign in favor of bonding the town, and it is believed that every tax payer present who had not previously subscribed, did so before the meeting closed.
    The Commissioners have met with such unanimous success so far, that we feel warranted in asserting that the town will be bonded for the full amount apportioned to us.
                            BENADAM FRINK, CHAIRMAN.
   Chas. W. Scott, Sec’y.
     
Chenango Telegraph
Wed., May 30, 1866

    The “Midland” at DeRuyter. - Engineer Laas during the past week has been surveying two routes from Norwich to DeRuyter. one runs over Crumb Hill, and passes just north of the village, near the residence of James Sutton. The other passes through the east and north parts of the village, entering it just east of the grist mill. We learn that either route is decidedly favorable to the construction of a railroad.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Sept. 19, 1866

    The Rival Routes. - Much interest is being exhibited upon the various rival routes for the Midland Railroad is this vicinity. It is understood that the two and a half miles excess upon the Cazenovia route having been wiped out  by the recent surveys, while the engineers put upon the DeRuyter line by Mr. Merchant have been able to trace a one over Crumb Hill which will compare favorably with the other lines, and which saves at least five miles over the former surveys: adding to this about two miles which the engineers are confident can be saved upon other portions of the DeRuyter route, render the advocates of that line confident of success in their location.

(One of the matters discussed by the Midland directors at a meeting in Syracuse Oct. 3).

Chenango Telegraph 
Oct. 10, 1866
      Independent surveys have been made upon some portions of the line which showed a more favorable roué in some respects than that recommended by the Engineer in Chief. -
    We may instance the Survey of Engineer Knight of the DeRuyter route,  via Crumb Hill which showed a saving over the South Otselic route surveyed by Mr. Laas of about file miles while the grades were not in any manner  objectionable. Mr. Knight also claimed a saving upon other portions of the line. In view of this fact, both the new and the old surveys were referred to Engineer Powell for further examination.

Chenango Telegraph 
Wed., May 15, 1867

    “The Midland road project must fail. They might as well endeavor to wear out the granite hills of New Hampshire with a one-horse plow, as to level or make practical for railroad purposes the hills they must encounter.”
    These “flowers of rhetoric” are found in the speech of John Butterfield of Utica, at the recent railroad meeting at Oriskany. We had supposed that this gentleman was a plain, practical man, and not given to poetry or drawing in his imagination. This extract, shows, however, that he is of fertile fancy, and exuberant illustration. 
    Such people are never are business men. We doubt whether the taxpayers will consent to place themselves in the hands of a man who is so poetic, as to associate the 60 feet grades from Syracuse to New York, over a fertile and agricultural country, with “the granite hills of New Hampshire,” or to assimilate an engine even if of no power than one of his “dummies” to the patriarchal one-horse plow of his grandfather.
    For such a work as his road, there is needed a practical man, and one one whose imagination like Mr. Butterfield’s, is nearly unlimited and uncontrollable.

Oneida Dispatch
January 4, 1868

    We think the most sensible plan for Cazenovia to get a railroad would be o construct one to DeRuyter to connect with the Auburn Branch of the Midland, then the people of New Woodstock would consent to bond, and as thee is no Alps to surmount they would reasonably expect a road. Syracuse we are confident will take the sober second thought and will build a railroad to DeRuyter.


Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Aug. 28, 1868

   DeRuyter. -  From DeRuyter to Norwich our railroad is now a fixed fact, and the engineers will be here in a fews days to make the final location.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Nov. 20, 1868

    The engineers of the DeRuyter branch of the Midland Railroad reached DeRuyter on Friday last. They have gone back to Otselic to finish the locating survey from there to DeRuyter.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Dec. 18, 1868

    DeRuyter. - Our railroad is located ready for contract to within a short distance of DeRuyter village and never has been more certainty of the speedy construction of the road than at present. Cuyler which has been backward in bonding, is waking up to the great benefit that she will receive from the road, and we have no doubt but what she will soon bond herself for the road.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, May 14, 1869

   DeRuyter. - We have had another railroad excitement the past week. The directors of the Midland R.R. required bonds to the amount of $20,000 of the corporation of DeRuyter village, and also additional personal subscriptions. A meeting was called to be held Thursday evening, but the ascend of the required amount of property were procured two days before the meeting was o be held, and the personal subscriptions procured, and now to sum up, for four years DeRuyter has fought for railroad, and we expect that in a few months we shall have one.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., May 19, 1869

                            The Midland Railroad
                                   ___
    On Tuesday of last week the Executive Committee of the Directors of the Midland Railroad held a meeting at Oneida, at which the question of the location of the Auburn Branch came up. Large delegations were present from the various towns interested in the Greene and Cortland Route, as well as those interested in the DeRuyter to Norwich Route. The delegates from the Greene route represented the interests of their line, and its business and financial reroutes in a very favorable light. The advantages of the other line being perfectly familiar to the Board and no speeches were made in its behalf. The commute reserved its decision.
    The committee upon location of Depots, & C., consisting of Messrs. Littlejohn, Foster and Merchant, of the Executive Committee, together with Chief Engineer Gilbert, Superintendent Day, and Master Mechanic Griggs are not performing the duty assigned them, by visiting and making personal inspection of the various localities. On Monday the committee examined the ground in this village, and though no formal announcement of the location for Depots here has been made, we believe it is no secret  that the lands of Messrs. Steere and York, lying on the south side of East Main Street will be selected.
    Those gentlemen have made most favorable terms with the company for the ground, and plenty of it at that, while in the other locality the prices asked were too large and the limits too circumscribed for the company’s use. The fact that any point north of the one selected, would not afford an easy junction of the Auburn branch and main line, may have had a controlling influence in the selection of the location. Our people have expressed some feeling in regard to this matter, and there has been a generous spirit of rivalry existing, but we are not aware that it has attained any considerable extent. 
    If the company carry out its expressed intentions, as of course it will, we don’t know as it makes any difference in regard to the location; all sections will be equally commoded; while those more remote will share its advantages they will not share the nuisances of the depot. Therefore it is well for all to quietly accept the situation. On other parts of the line the work is going on nobly.
    We have already announced the arrival of the locomotive “Oswego” at Oneida. We saw it at work the other day and believe it is conceded by all hands that these locomotives (for all purchased, 13 in number, are of the same kind,) are the best that can be secured for the road. The “Madison” is now a Utica awaiting shipment down the valley to this place. The “Chenango” is at work at Sidney. Another has been ordered, named after our village, “Norwich” Three thousand tons of railroad iron are on the way here, and track-laying will commence at an early day. For the time, everything looks well. For our village, our citizens should not hold back from the demands made upon them for its advancement, but should promptly respond, and thus secure all the advantages which are due us as the pioneers in this great enterprise.
Oneida Dispatch
Friday, May 21, 1869

    A corps of engineers are now in DeRuyter preparing to commence the survey of the branch of the Midland R.R. from Crumb Hill (where the survey was left last fall) to Auburn. We are also pleased to note that the towns betwixt DeRuyter and Auburn are waking up to the necessity of the Midland, and from the fact that the nearest route from Auburn o New York passed through our village, it requires but little the sagacity to see that if the proposed branch is every built it will be by day of Auburn.  The fashion of bonding inaugurated by the Midland R.R. has become a fixture with us. 

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., May 26, 1869

    The Midland Railroad
          _____
Location of the Auburn Branch from Norwich to DeRuyter - Norwich bonds for $75,000 in its aid - The strike ended, and work resumed.
          _____
    We stated in our last, that the location of the Auburn branch was postponed by the Executive Committee. We are now enabled to announce by authority of a Telegraph Dispatch from Mr. Littlejohn, that the AUBURN BRANCH IS LOCATED FROM NORWICH TO DeRUYTER. From DeRuyter west a competent corps of engineers under charge of Mr. Theodore Randall, is now engaged seeking out the most desirable route, either by Cortland or that north of there, and on the coming in of whose report the remainder of the line to Auburn will be located. 
    The road from Norwich to Auburn will pass through an excellent section of country which will its ample support, which together with its through connections will make it a most valuable addition to the stock of the Midland.
    A large majority of our own citizens abundantly appreciate the great advantages which are to accrue to our village and to our business interests generally, from this connection,have generously consented to bond our corporation for the sum of $75,000 in aid of the construction of the road from this place to Auburn. DeRuyter has also added upwards of $25,000 to its already large subscription. The other owns are doing all they can, in the way of subscriptions. They should strain every never to make it a success, and we have no doubt they will. 
    Arrangements have been made to put the Road under immediate contract as far as DeRuyter, as soon as the right of way is secured, which must be obtained by the Company substantially free of expense, previous thereto. In furtherance of this, we learn that a large majority of the farms along the line have already contracted to give the right of way, the others should do so at once; this being accomplished, the “dirt will fly” from Norwich to DeRuyter, in double quick time.
    In view of this action of of the Board we learn that our Syracuse friends are already diverting their attention from former contemplated connections and are seriously contemplating a connection with the Midland at DeRuyter. This will be a move for them in the right direction, and will give that City the easiest and cheapest competing route to the great City of New York.
    We have said that the above location will prove a most important one to our village. By it we are made not only the termini of two Divisions of the mainline, but of the Auburn branch and of the Sherburne road as well. This insured to our village the location of the Division Manufacturing, Machine and Repair shops, the untold advantages of which can be estimate only by those who are familiar with the extent of such works. The Company have already purchased from 30 to 30 acres of Messrs. Steere and York in this village, upon which to locate their works, Depot buildings &c.
    Upon the main line we are glad to say the strikes are practically ended and that the work is going on again with commendable vigor. Five boat loads of iron have already been delivered upon this division and more are on the way, Track laying all soon commence, and then look out for the iron horse.


Chenango Union, Norwich
May 26, 1869

                  The Midland.
                       ___   
    The consent of the taxpayers of the village of Norwich has been obtained to bond the corporation for $50,000 to aid in the constriction of the Auburn Branch, should the Company decide to make the connection at Norwich; also, for $25,000 towards purchasing lands and erecting buildings to be used as machine shops by the Company. 
    The Company last week purchased about thirty acres of land of Charles York, and it is expected that the machine shops will be located on these grounds, which are situated between East Main Street and the point where the railroad crosses the rive, and just south of the place selected for the depot.
    We understand that 300 tons of iron for the Midland arrived at North Norwich by canal, last week, and was unloaded at that place; also that nearly 3,000 tons more may be expected at Norwich in a few days. The new engine “Madison” is at Sherburne, but is soon to be taken to Earlville where a temporary track will be laid to the Midland track, and the engine by tis means placed upon the line, to be used for the purpose of construction and to transport the iron and other material to different points on the line. The grading between North Norwich and Sherburne Four Corners will be completed in about four weeks, and the work on the extension is being urged forward as fast as possible.
Oneida Dispatch
Friday, May 28, 1869

The engineers on the Auburn branch of the Midland have located the road north of the village, near James Sutton’s. The depot will be on the farm of Leroy H. Howes.    

Hamilton Democratic Republican
Thursday, June 3, 1869

The Majority of the taxpayers of DeRuyter village have consented to bond the corporation to the amount of $20,000 in addition to their proportion of the $103,000 for which the town was previously bonded for the Midland Railroad.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, June 4, 1869

    Our people through whose farms the Midland passes , have, with one or two exceptions, given he right of way. The town of Truxton is bonded for $124,000 for the railroad and Cuyler is bonded for $65,000. Fabius are moving to secure the road through their own. The surveyors found a  very favorable route through Truxton.


Chenango Telegraph
Wed., June 16, 1869

                         Midland Items.
                              ____
    The work goes bravely on! About 1,200 tons of iron have already been delivered at the North Norwich crossing. - which we learn has been named Limerick Depot, and track laying is going forward. Above Earlville, near Whipple Clark’s, a large quantity of iron is also being unloaded, and track laying commenced there on Monday. The sites for most of the depots between Oswego and Norwich have been selected. There will be 35 depots, in all, between the two points.
    Ground was to be broken today, (Tuesday) upon the Crumb Hill summit, about four miles east of DeRuyter. “Forward along the entire line,” seems to be the watchword of the Midland Directors. The steam saw-mill at Eaton belonging to the Midland R.R., which has been used for getting out ties for the road during the winter, is to be removed by E.O. White and a force of men to Sidney, where it will be used for getting out lumber for depots, etc.

Chenango Union
June 20, 1869

                The Midland
                      ____
   Work on the Midland is progressing favorably in this vicinity. We understand that the grading between North Norwich and Earlville is completed, and the locomotive “Madison” is to be placed upon the track near Earlville, the present week. Track is being laid above North Norwich at the are of about half a mile per day, and, as soon as it is laid to the point whee the “Madison” is to be put upon it, we shall expect to hear of more rapid progress.
    One small cut is all the grading that remains unfinished between Norwich and North Norwich, and with the completion of that, the bridges, which are already far advanced, the track will be laid to Norwich.
    The bridge across Lyon Brook is the most considerable work between Norwich and Sidney, and we are informed that is being pushed forward as fast as skillful workmen can accomplish it. Two boats are now unloading stone for this structure at the Half-Way House, which have been brought from Waterloo. 
    The whole work on the one between Oswego and Sidney is in an advanced star, and i cannot be more than a few weeks before the shrill whistle of the locomotive will wake the echoes among the hills of Chenango.


Chenango Union
June 20, 1869

                The Midland
                      ____
   Work on the Midland is progressing favorably in this vicinity. We understand that the grading between North Norwich and Earlville is completed, and the locomotive “Madison” is to be placed upon the track near Earlville, the present week. Track is being laid above North Norwich at the are of about half a mile per day, and, as soon as it is laid to the point where the “Madison” is to be put upon it, we shall expect to hear of more rapid progress.
    One small cut is all the grading that remains unfinished between Norwich and North Norwich, and with the completion of that, the bridges, which are already far advanced, the track will be laid to Norwich.
    The bridge across Lyon Brook is the most considerable work between Norwich and Sidney, and we are informed that is being pushed forward as fast as skillful workmen can accomplish it. Two boats are now unloading stone for this structure at the Half-Way House, which have been brought from Waterloo. 
    The whole work on the one between Oswego and Sidney is in an advanced state, and i cannot be more than a few weeks before the shrill whistle of the locomotive will wake the echoes among the hills of Chenango.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., June 23, 1869

                         The Auburn Branch
                                   ____
The work begun - Ground broken at
Crumb Hill - 2,500 People present. - 
Great Enthusiasm. - Speeches, Bonfires,
Illuminations, &c. at DeRuyter. 
The left wing a "fixed fact."
              _____
    On Tuesday the 15th inst. the citizens of DeRuyter and the surrounding towns assembled at Crumb Hill to unite the ceremony of breaking ground upon the Norwich and DeRuyter Division of the Auburn Branch of the Midland Railroad.
The day promised fair, and in company with Engineer Gilbert, Contractor Sage and E.J. Loomis, we climbed the "impassable mountain," which by the way the Engineer says is reached at its summit by a grade slightly exceeding 60 feet to the mile.
    We found quite a number of citizens had already assembled, though it was then some two hours in advance of the ceremony. The "baby waker" which was stationed upon the summit, had awoke them early, and anxious to prove the truth of the assertion that the work was to be commenced on that day, they we're thus early upon the ground.
    Partaking of a good dinner at Mr. Crumb’s hospitable table, we viewed the ground. Going to the spot indicated by the Engineer as the “summit,” we found to the north and south of us, high hills towering hundreds of feet above us, which would seem and doubtless are impassable, but where we stood  upon the line run by the Engineer was a depression which seemed to have been providentially designed for the Midland, and the deliverance of that people from commercial darkness, affording not only a feasible, but an excellent line for the construction of the road.
    At two o’clock, we heard music in the distance, and soon the DeRuyter procession numbering upwards of two hundred vehicles, packet to their utmost capacity, and embracing 1,500 to 1,800 people, hove in sight with banners flying and headed by DeRuyter’s fine Brass Band, and two excellent Martial Bands, all of whom with the “baby waker,” united in a grand “Feu de joie” as the procession marched from the road to the place of the ground breaking.    The meeting was called to order by Rev. A.E. Clark of DeRuyter, who had been designated as President of the day.
    The following named gentlemen were appointed Vice Presidents, representing the various towns interested: Sprague Barber, Otselic;  Z.C. Randall, Cuyler; George B. Cushman, Plymouth; George Bliss, Truxton; Isaac Case, Fabius; Jonathan Brown, Georgetown; Ezekiel Carpenter, New Woodsock; Thomas Holl, Lincklaen; B. Gage Berry, Norwich; Prof. H.C. Coon, of DeRuyter Institute, was appointed Secretary.
   The President briefly and happily addressed the people, congratulating them upon the auspicious commencement of the great work which their hearts have been so long set upon, and then introduced Prof. L.E. Livermore, who invoked the Divine Blessing.
    The President then introduce the Orator of the Day, A.V. Bently, Esq. of DeRuyter, who spoke as follows:
    Mr. President and Fellow Citizens:
    Permit me to congratulate you on the occasion which calls us together. If we may not always credit what our ears hear - we must be permitted to believe whilst our eyes can still see.
    Work is now about to begin on the Norwich, DeRuyter and Auburn Branch of the Midland Railroad.
    This action of the county has been settled now more than half a century. Fifty years ago - within the memory of some of us here -0 these hills and villages where now cultivated farms and fields appear, were covered with primeval forests. A few hardy and adventurous settlers had broken into the wilderness, and were making clearings to obtain scanty subsistence. The tinkle of the cow bell in he distant thicket, the chirp the squirrel, and the blows of the wood chopper’s ax were the sounds which broke the silence of the settlements.
    Scarcely scattered, with no school houses, with highways impassable to wheel carriages, the inhabitants went to meeting on foot and to mill on horseback, glad indeed  if by traveling ten miles they could return with grist ground the same day. Such were among the discomforts and privations incident to the early settlement of the country.
    What great and mighty changes have come over us since the days of the pioneers. But no event in the history of this part of the state, equals the importance  the occasion which we have met to signalize today.   Our railroad is no longer a pleasant thing to be dreamed of, never to be realized, but a fixed fact. Its construction is now about to commence, the sod to be broken, and the first shovel full of dirt cast. Hence forward let no man say this thing is an enterprise we are never to see. The work once begun is more than half accomplish. Where the courage to undertake and the will to do, exist, no obstacle can stand in way of its fulfillment.
    It is true, it is almost beyond what the most enthusiastic among us could have hoped a few years ago. Who of us who are natives to the soil, or who have dwelled here for year, expected to live to see the day when a Railroad should be built from Norwich through Plymouth and Pharsalia, Otselic, Georgetown and DeRuyter, connecting with the great thoroughfares, and letting us out into the daylight and business of the world? Nevertheless, we are here to emphasize the occasion and give expression to our feelings upon the inauguration of this work.
    Few of us, perhaps, can understand how much planning and forecast, what intellectual toil and physical labor, thus far, has required to combine and perfect the means necessary even to this beginning. Whoever thinks the building of a Railroad is a holy-day affair, has but a poor conception of the nature of the business.
    But what great public enterprise was ever yet undertaken, much less accomplished, without effort - united, intelligently directed and persistent effort. And I might add, what enterprise like this was ever undertaken without the usual amount of opposing and discouragements? To encourage the timid, disarm the opposition, to concentrate effort and wield the powers available o the common purpose, are among the difficult things to be met and overcome.
    How successfully these have been attained, let the errand which brings us here to today declare. For now of a certainty is this road a settled thing.
    I see here the forms of venerable men in our midst. They are the remnant of the generation of the fathers. They are present to witness this ceremony. It is eminently fitting that dot them should be awarded the honor of striking the first blow on the work. May they live to see the connection of the enterprise. Am when they when their turn, shall be gathered to the Father’s may they be able to say like the aged Simeon, “Now let thy servant depart in peace since mine eyes have seen thy salvation.”
    In the achievement of the work, too much praise cannot be awarded to the able and indefatigable President, Mr. Littlejohn, Chief Engineer Gilbert, and the board of directors of the Midland road. With far seeing sagacity and indomitable energy have they pushed things to this final conclusion. Much as we may owe, however, to the board collectively we are nevertheless indebted in an especial manner to our own Directors for this result. I am sure I only express a common sentiment, when I publicly recognize the great obligations we are under to our respected townsman and fellow citizen, Mr. Merchant, for the location of this road through our midst.
    We have witnessed the untiring efforts and anxious care by day and by night he has given to the work, through evil and through good report, when others doubted its success, and the confidence of men faded, he has firmly and calmly always assured us that the road would be built. I confess there have been times when I despaired of seeing it. But the board appealed to the towns to bond. He traversed and re-traversed wood, ground, and visited every town and village on the route. B. Gage Berry, Esq., the able Secretary, and other officers of the board, were indefatigable in their efforts; also enterprising and spirited men of our own and adjacent towns have given to it their heartiest support. The inhabitants on the line in the main generously responded to its aid. The corporation of the village of Norwich; the towns of Norwich, Plymouth, Pharsalia, Otselic, Georgetown and DeRuyter, have nobly met the call. They have contributed, and pledge to contribute, largely to help.
    Fellow citizens, we must doubt no longer: this work is to be an accomplished fact, for I tell you that where business  capacity, money and brains are all united, there is no such word as fail. This undertaking moreover is to be speedily consummated. In 18 months the scream of the whistle and thunder of the trains will scare the echoes out of this wooden country from their ancient hiding places, and startle the inhabitants of the Midland counties into newness of life.
    The fact is, Railroads have become an institution of prime necessity. The exigencies of the country demand their construction. Look at the vast resources of the interior of the State. They have never yet been opened  to the demands of commerce; they rest in their native conditions undisturbed, yet harkening for the voice with shall bid them come forth. The inexhaustible beds of gypsum and lime, elements necessary to enrich and fertile the soil are there; the stones which sleep in the quarries on the hill side are waiting for the resurrection at hand, impatient to leap from their rocky beds.
    The agricultural products, the staple articles of butter, cheese and wool destined, particularly he products of the dairy, to be an unfailing source of wealth, must, and will seek the ice wear for outlets to market; and when this road in its progress shall stretch arms to the lakes, it is as certain to take the through freight and travel of the west as the sun is to rise tomorrow. Traversing the Empire State diagonally, it will ultimately become one of the great thoroughfares of the nation. 
    Whoever knew human enterprise t go around when cross-lots were the shorter and cheaper route. These streams of commerce will become as unfailing as the waters which pour over the cataract of Niagara; and will cease only when the great falls shall have drained the waters of the upper lakes.
   Mr. President, this is no fancy sketch; we are on the eve of realizing all this and even more. Why should it be deemed a thing incredible with you, that there be those standing here, who shall not go hence to their final home, till they see long trains of cars passing from Omaha, freighted with the products of the rich rolling prairies of the west, and traversing half a continent without breaking bulk, to pour their treasures into the commercial marts of the Atlantic states. Turn you sued to the west, (Let me correct that expression, for where is the west?)  
  Already the supposed impossible barrier of the great mountain chains has been conquered. The travel may soon take his west here to the Midland cars and speeding away onward towards the setting sun, over prairie and plain, across yawing chasms,  and beneath frowning crags, pause not night or day, until from the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada’s his eye rests where the waves of the Pacific Ocean break in thunder on the golden shores. But I must not swell on this prospect, however inspiring the them. One word and I have done.
   I have said that the exigences of the country demand the building of railroads. I should add that the spirit of the age requires it. Whatever the school houses and churches may have wrought for us in the past, the railroad has become an indispensable  adjunct of modern civilization. It is one of the humanizing agonies of our day. Henceforth they are to be indissolubly identified with the social status, and prospective greatness of our country. The elements of that greatness are illimitable. No bounds can be set to them. We might as well command the sun and moon to stand still, attempt to roll back the waves of the seem as seek to stay the progressive energies of the times.
    Let us accept this boon which has come to our door and rejoice that a new era has dawned on us. Let is signalize this event with joy, with the firing of cannon and the ringing of bells, with bonfires and illuminations, for he day of our deliverance and our rejoicing has come.
    L.B. Kern, Esq., was called for and responded, briefly reviewing the efforts of the early friends of the road and the obstacles which they had to encounter. D.Q. Mitchell and Prof. L.E. Livermore paid a fitting tribute to the efforts of J.W. Merchant, Esq., the resident director, and to whom all were indebted for his untiring efforts in behalf of this branch of the enterprise; after which three cheers were proposed for Mr. Merchant and were given with will, for is faithful and efficient labors. B. Gage Berry, of Norwich, was next called for and briefly responded, after which three rousing cheers were given for the friends of the road in Norwich.
    Col. C.H. Sage, one of the contractors, spoke of the prospects of the road. He pledged himself and his associated to do their portion of the work as promptly as the people had theirs, and that in the eighteen months allotted them, the contractors would endeavor to complete the road from Norwich to DeRuyter.
    All the speakers were attentively listened to, and were frequently interrupted by applause, while two or three were made the target for showers of bouquets from the ladies, a compliment which was duly acknowledged by the fortunate recipients.
    At this point the lowering skies admonished the crowd that the concluding ceremonies must be briefly carrie out. J.W. Merchant, Esq., the resident director, was then designated by the President to break the soil; a work which he however, with characteristic  gallantry, delegated to one of DeRuyter’s fairest daughters, Miss Ada Sutton, and right well did she perform it. Mr. Merchant followed, and after him the old and young men, and mothers and daughters, each as inclination dictated, moved shovel after shovel full, until compelled to desist by a drenching rain which by this time had begun to fall.
    Thus the work on the Auburn Branch of the Midland was begin. The attendance upon the ceremony of break ground was large. Some estimated it as high as 4,000; our own opinion, however,  (and we had the best of opportunities to look over the crowd,) is that at least 2,500 men and women participated in the inauguration of this great enterprise. Dispersed by the rain, the multitude sought refuge in carriages and the adjacent houses and barns as far as they were able to obtain admission, and not a few were compelled to stand in the storm without shelter of any kind. It was of but short duration, however, and soon under the rays of a lovely summer’s sun the vast crowd dispersed homeward, each well assured that the Auburn Branch is a “fixed fact.”
    The great event, however, was not be thus dismissed by the citizens of DeRuyter. At sun-down, the “baby waker” called the crowds together again in that beautiful village to fitly close the proceedings of the day. At dark a fine bonfire was lighted upon the public square, which was the signal for a general illumination of the residences and business places. We took a walk about town and were at once surprised and pleased at the gorgeousness of the display. It was not confined  to a few, but all, rich and poor, high and low, who took part in this demonstration.
    Many of the houses were brilliantly illuminated and rivaled similar attempts of more pretentious localities. Among them we mention those of Mr. Sutton, L.B. Kern, Esq., M.R. Merchant and Mr. Sears. We would gladly mention the names of others did we know them. A pleasant feature to us was that the gates not only, but the doors were open to all who had gathered to celebrate upon the occasion. The festivities were kept up until a late hour.
    It was a proud day for DeRuyter, and its citizens, and a prouder one still for the resident Director, J.W. Merchant. May all be able to realize the full fruition of the hopes raised by the auspicious commencement of the work upon the Auburn Branch.
    It is fortune for the people on the Auburn Branch, that Messrs. Sage, Williams and Jerome have secured the contract. If any body in the world can push it through they can. They have approved themselves to the Board as most thorough-going and energetic contractors, and will, we have no doubt, complete the grading from Norwich to DeRuyter within the 18 months as provided in their contract.
    At the close to the festivities of the day the following resolution as a fitting acknowledgement to the Board of Directors of the Midland, was passed:
    Resolved. - That President D.C. Littlejohn and his associate Directors are entitled to our hearty thanks for their persistent efforts in the great work in which they are engaged; and especially for their paint hearing and consideration of the various rival routes, and their final disposition thereof. For this we shall ever hold them in grateful remembrance. 


Hamilton Democratic Republican
June 24, 1869

   Midland. - During the past three months most rapid progress has been made on the Midland Railroad. Miles of track are already laid, where three months ago the ground had not been broken, and it will be but a few weeks before we shall hear the snort of the Iron Horse upon the line.
    Ground has been broken on the Auburn Branch near DeRuyter and that line is fast assuming shape. The crossing of the Central is almost completed at Oneida, the track laid under the Central and the whole work there assuming shape. As many men are employed upon the line as can work to advantage, and we may reasonably hope to have another means of communication with the world a large in a very short time.

Sabbath Recorder, Alfred Center, NY
June 24, 1869

    DeRuyter Affairs
                                      DeRuyter, June 15, 1869
To the Editor of the Sabbath Recorder:
    The commencing of labor upon the Norwich and DeRuyter branch of the Midland Railroad, was celebrated by the citizens of DeRuyter and the neighboring towns, June 15, by appropriate ceremonies. Crumb Hill, that suppose unsurmountable barrier to the road, was the place where labor was to commence.
    A large procession of teams (about three hundred) accompanied by the two bands of the town, started for that place about one o'clock p.m.  and arrived there about two o'clock, congregating back of Mr. Benjamin Crumb's, where a deep cut is to be made. The chairman, Rev. A.G. Clarke, of DeRuyter, called the assembly to order, and after electing vice presidents from the different towns represented, and a secretary, the exercises were opened by prayer by Rev. L.E. Livermore. A.V. Bentley made a speech well adapted to the occasion, which was followed by speeches from L.B. Kern, Esq., D.Q.  Mitchell, Esq., and Elder L.E. Livermore, of DeRuyter, B. Gage Berry, Esq., of Norwich, secretary of the road, and Col. C.H.Sage, one of the contractors.
    Those spoke of the past history of the road and its future prospects as continuing on to Auburn and the Great West. The work, which is to go on with all possible speed until completed, was commenced by J.W.  Merchant, the resident director, assisted by both gentlemen and ladies.
    The exercises were interspersed with music by the two bands from DeRuyter. The road is to be completed in eighteen months. Some three hundred hands will be released from the other branch of the road and put upon Crumb Hill to work by the first of July.  
    Much praise is due to J.W. Merchant for his untiring efforts to secure the road where now laid. DeRuyter made the first move for the Midland, held the first meeting and I believe was the first to bond, and now she looks with bright hopes for her reward.
    There were between two and three thousand people present, and every thing passed off pleasantly. The town was illuminated drink the evening, the Institute shining with its many windows a welcome to the progress of the day.
    By the way, the closing exercises of this term of DeRuyter Institute take place on Tuesday, the 29th of June; address by Rev. A. B. Prentice, of Adams Center. The proposition for the removal of the school is now abandoned, and the prospects for the next year, commencing August 25th, are quite flattering. DeRuyter, with the coming railroad, is bound to be a center of business enterprise and intelligence.
                                                     N.C. Coon.
  Chenango Telegraph
Wed., June 30, 1869

   A correspondent of the Cazenovia Republican in giving an account of the opening of the Auburn Branch at Crumb Hill, of which we had full particulars last week, says that among those present were "several aged men, remnants of the pioneers and settlers of the country in an early day.
   "Among them were Mr. Elijah C. Benjamin, aged 81, first white child born in DeRuyter; Col. E.D. Jencks, aged 79; Mr. George Hull, aged 82; Capt. Ira C. Burdick and Deacon A. Fairbank, respectively aged 70 years. These were in attendance to witness the changes which a half century had wrought, and to them was awarded the honor, in connection with the local director and several enthusiastic ladies, of casting the first shovels full of dirt, when the plow had broken the ground.
   "The work on this important arm of the Midland is now being vigorously prosecuted at various points under contracts which guarantee its completion to DeRuyter within eighteen months. The survey thence to Auburn is nearly finished, and follows an unexpectedly easy grade and feasible route." 

Oneida Dispatch
July 2, 1869

    The Midland is progressing favorably. The excavations have discovered a vein of sand which is duly appreciated by the inhabitants in the vicinity of Crumb Hill. Hitherto they have had to go several miles to procure their supply of this indispensable building material. The company with wise forethought has  purchased several hundred acres of wood-land near Crumb Hill.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., July 14, 1869

                                    Midland.
                                      ____
   The bad weather has so interfered with the contractors, that they were not able to get the track to the Sherburne junction ready for the track-layers last week. They are pushing it as fast as circumstances will permit. Both north and south of here, the grading is being finished. But little more is to be done on the south river bridge. It is a good piece of work. At Lyon Brook, order is developing out of chaos. The foundations for the four main pillars - those starting from the road and the bed of the brook - are completed, and the super-structures, which are built of the Waterloo stone, are commenced. Some of the canal boats on their up trip for these stone are this side of the break in the canal near Utica, and some are beyond it. It is feared that the delay thereby occasioned, will somewhat interfere with the work on the bridge.
    A delegation from Otisco, Onondaga County, visited this village last week, to confer with our railroad people relative to the route of the Midland west from DeRuyter. They claimed with great confidence, that the better line would run through Tully and Otisco, and thence to Skaneateles, saving five or six miles over the Cortland survey, and being as short as the line already surveyed through Spafford, without the necessity of the tunnel which that route requires. So sure are they of this, that they have raised the money for the survey, and one will doubtless be ordered by the Midland Company.
   Work on the DeRuyter branch goes on vigorously. Five hundred additional hands are expected  in a few days on the line of the works.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, July 16, 1869
   
    DeRuyter. - DeRuyter  is improving more this summer than it has for the past ten years. M.R. Merchant finds his large store not large enough to hold all his goods, and he has built a warehouse in the rear of his store. A.N. Annas has commenced building a dwelling house on Cortland street, adjoining the lot of Mr. Kemp. George F. Annas and Perry H. Lewis are preparing to build themselves residences in the same locality.

Oneida Community Circular
Thurs., July 22, 1869

    On the road toward the Castle we see the track in its completed state. When we read of the first train over the new road, with its brilliant company of officers, citizens and members of the press, stopping to dine and express congratulations, we are apt to imagine the valleys resounding  to the first shriek of the locomotive, and the country folks all running to see such an unusual sight.
    But the fact is, the country folks are prepared months beforehand by the daily presence of he locomotive on the unfinished track. The engine is one of the most efficient agents to the construction of the road. Besides bringing ties, rails and gravel up to the end of the line, the engine by its very passage over the new track helps to level it and bring the ties to their bearings in manner which would otherwise be difficult.
    The ties are not bedded before the rails are laid, but are thrown loosely on the grading and the rails are spiked to them, forming a continuous ladder on the ground. Over this next comes the engine with its cars of gravel, which is thrown off between the ties and tamped under them, while the ladder of ties and rails is pried up by large levers. 
   This process is repeated, the engine meanwhile passing and re-passing until about a foot of solid gravel is added to the grading. This layer is called “ballasting” and prevents heaving by frost. The master track-layer is continually straightening the line and rounding the curves with with a small force who pry the rails, with ties attached, this way and that at pleasure.
  This business requires a precise eye, which is evidently possessed by Mr. Quinn, the gentlemanly master track-layer of the Midland. Here at the gravel bed is the boarding-car. This is Mr. Quinn’s contrivance. A tall car built of pine boards, the length and width of common passenger cars, in two stories, the upper one containing bunks for thirty-six men; the lower one divided into a dining room and diminutive kitchen which, though scarcely large enough to turn around it, the two colored individuals who officiate as cooks say is plenty large to cook in for a hundred men.
   This “palace car” travels with the track-laying company, keeping near the scene of operations, The men find their home nearby when work is done and are on hand promptly at the morning hour. This car has been standing near our house for a few days past, but this morning (Saturday) the engine pushed it across the long trestle work which crosses the valley, and we shall see it no more. This is the first time the engine has been over the trestle work.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Aug. 27, 1869

    DeRuyter. - The engineer of the Midland was in town last week, and laid out the work for the contractors from Bumpus’ meadow, east into Georgetown. We learn that the building of the DeRuyter branch will be pressed vigorously this fall.


Chenango Union
Wed., Sept. 1, 1869

                               The Midland Railroad
                                       _____
                A TRAIN OF CARS IN NORWICH!
                                      _____
    The work of track-laying was pushed forward last week under orders of  Chief Engineer Gilbert and other officials, and the result was that the rails were laid several rods south of the corporation line, and the engine “Madison” and three platform cars run within the village limits on Saturday night. The occasion was one of great rejoicing to all our citizens, as it gave proof positive that this great enterprise is rapidly approaching completion; and as the shrill whistle of the engine was heard in the village, we began to realize the great change that is about to be wrought in the mode of travel to and from Norwich.
    The track will this week be laid as far as the depot grounds on East Main Street; and in the meantime the work of ballasting the road between Norwich and Sherburne Four Corners will be accomplished as fast as possible, to enable the Utica, Chenango & Susquehanna Valley Railroad to run cars to Norwich. It is estimated two or three weeks will be required to do the ballasting.
    President Littlejohn was in town this week, and we learn it has been decided to build a passenger depot at this place 40 feet wide and 100 feet long, and two stories high. The freight depot is to be 40 by 100 feet. A round-house and turn-table will also be built immediately. The Company advertise for proposals to build the depot buildings; plans and specifications can be seen at the Treasurer’s office in Norwich.
    We are assured that the grading on the Midland is nearly all completed between Oswego and Sidney Plains, and more than half of the track is laid. There seems to be no doubt in the minds of railroad men that the cars will run from Norwich to Oswego during the month of October.
    
Chenango Union
Wed., Sept. 15, 1869

             The Midland.
                _____
    Norwich begins to assume the appearance of a railroad town, although no passenger trains yet run into the village. The screams of the steam whistles, and ringing of the bells on the engines “Madison” and “Otsego,” which are regularly heard every morning and evening create quite a sensation in our village, which never before was honored by a visit from any vehicle propelled by steam.
    Several parties have availed themselves of the courtesy of railroad officials, and taken excursions as far as North Norwich, and express themselves delighted with the trip, although made on a platform car. A double track is laid past the depot grounds, as far south as the turn-table, while the main track is to be immediately laid to the fine stone quarry on the farm of Mr. John Shattuck, about four miles south of the village, fur the purpose of enabling the company to get stone to erect their buildings in this place, and for other works along the line.
    The turn-table is being put down, and will be completed during the present week. We are informed that six of the piers for the Lyon Brook  bridge are completed, and the foundations for all the others are laid. It is expected that the work of putting up the iron superstructure of the bridge will commence next week. Chief Engineer Gilbert is expected in town today when the awards of contracts for the depot buildings will be made, and the work of building then commenced immediately.
    Engineers arrived in town on Monday, for the purpose of laying out the work on the Auburn Branch Road, which work is to be commenced at once and urged forward as fast as possible.
    The Oneida Dispatch of last week says: - “Two more engines for the Midland reached here last Saturday. They are named Oneida and the Ulster. Three more engines are expected this week. The contract for building the depot in this place has been awarded to Klock & Co. The work upon it will be pushed along as fast as possible. A large number of telegraph poles have been set, and it is expected that the wires will be up and offices open from West Monroe to Norwich within a short time.”

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Sept. 17, 1869

    DeRuyter. - Work on the railroad is going on vigorously, and a large additional force will be out on the present week. We learn it is contemplated to make changes. The location from Crumb Hill is to pass on the west side of the river o Aurelius Breed’s. This will save three-fourths of a mile in distance, and can be more clearly constructed.

Chenango Telegraph
Oct. 6, 1869

   Work on the Midland at DeRuyter is being pushed at the present time. Over 100 laborers have been put on in DeRuyter alone, during the past week.
    A steam shovel will shortly be in operation and preparations are being made to lay a track for the dirt cars.
   The reinforcement of labors are principally Swedes, and it is someone amusing to see our merchants trade with them. Their lingo is unintelligible jargon to our folks.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Oct. 20, 1869

            DeRuyter Items
    The wise men of Syracuse, seeing the mistake they made in permitting the Midland Railroad to go around them, have been very busy in devising a scheme to retain the trade which naturally belongs to them, and they have devised a plan, which, from its boldness and originality, challenges the admiration of the world. The plan proposed is this:
    Build a railroad from Syracuse up the Erie canal as far as Chittenango, thence down the Chittenango creek to Cazenovia Lake on a suspension bridge, giving tourists an unequalled view of that picturesque sheet of water; thence to Erieville, passing under Erieville reservoir in a tunnel; thence to Georgetown to the top of Muller Hill, where will be the grand terminus of the road.
    Here will be formed the connection with the whole world by means of air balloons constructed after the fashion of the California Aerial Navigation Company’s balloon. We understand the balloons will be ready for practical use (and we have no doubt they will) as soon as Chief Engineer Powell finishes his surveys, as he has several quarter sections of Madison County not yet staked out.
    A few town bonds will be taken to aid the enterprise, and the old bonds for the United States Accident Insurance Company, having never been used, and being prettily engraved can easily be used. If common gas does not prove sufficient to inflate the balloons, a few of Messrs. Mitchell and Alvord’s speeches will place the question of supply of gas beyond any contingency.
   This is a well conceived plan and we have no doubt of its final success, provided the surveys can be completed and the connections made according to the original plan above set forth. Work on the railroad is progressing favorably. The Swedes who have been on strike for about a week have mostly gone to work again.

                         Property Agreement
 The printed form is shown here in red. The black is handwritten.

  In Consideration of One Dollar, To me in hand paid by the NEW YORK AND OSWEGO MIDLAND RAILROAD COMPANY, the receipt of which is hereby confessed, and in consideration that at my request heretofore made, said Company shall and will locate the line of their road across any part of my land in the town of Norwich, County of Chenango described as follows: On the line through my land as surveyed by the Company’s Engineer for the construction of the Auburn Branch of said Road, the Company are to pay me for moving my barn or move it themselves as I select. 
     I am to have a good easy grade crossing with gates for my convenience. I am to have the use for cultivation indie of the Company’s fences all that they enclose that can be cultivated - and in further consideration of the advantages and benefits to me of such location, I, Benjamin Evans of said town and county, do covenant and agree that I will grant, convey and release to said Company, by a good and sufficient Warranty Deed, within ten days after being notified of the location, and furnished with a correct description in writing of the land required, so much and such part of my said land as shall be deemed necessary for the construction and operation of the proposed  Railroad, not exceeding one hundred feet in width, upon being paid therefor the sum of One dollar for the right of way. The Company bind themselves to fence their road and to forever maintain the same and to fence close to their roadway as they may establish it.
   And I further covenant that the said Company may enter upon such lands to lay out their Road, and may commence the work of construction before the formal execution of the conveyance, they doing no unnecessary damage. No Irish Shanties or other nuisances to be allowed on this right of way. I am to have a free pass for two years over their road.
    In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 23rd day of October, 1869. It is agreed that the Company are to pay me $250 for moving my barn and water works.
Benjamin Evans


Chenango Union
Wed., Nov. 17, 1869

    The walls of the round-house at this place are nearly up, and the freight depot is to be speedily completed. We understand that it is quite doubtful about the passenger depot being built before spring. The ticket office will be temporarily located in the Eating House, which is nearly finished.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Dec. 1, 1869

(Excerpt from article headlined "The Midland Opening - Future Arrangements")
    "On Saturday morning the President, Chief Engineer, and resident Director made a thorough examination of the track, the branch connections, and the Depot necessities here. New surveys and estimates were ordered upon the branch junction, and a temporary passenger depot was ordered to be speedily erected at once upon the south side of East Street. A temporary freight depot is also to be erected at once, and nothing will be left undone which will insure the conduct or benefit of those doing business at our Depot. Thus the good work goes forward. "Now on to New York!"

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Dec. 24, 1869

    The Midland met with an obstruction, last Saturday, which had not been found by the engineers, and for a time we were afraid that DeRuyter would lose the Midland. Joseph Best, who resides about 2 1/2 miles east of the village, owns a very pretty sugar orchard through which the said railroad is to pass.
    Mr. B. has never given the right of way. The railroad company had made him an offer, but he had not accepted it last week. Work was commenced on his farm on Saturday. He threatened to shoot the men if they did not abandon their work. He was arrested, brought to the village and examined by Squire Bentley, and some way the matter was fixed up and work resumed on Best’s farm.
    The steam shovel draws a great many visitors from surrounding towns.  

Chenango Telegraph 
Wed., Dec. 8, 1869

    The Steam Shovel has arrived in DeRuyter and will be ready for work in a few days. The final survey for the railroad is made through this village. The line crosses between Richard Draper’s and Mrs. Langworthy’s. The Depot will be in the meadow of James Sutton, north of Henry Russel’s.
    Large additions to the working force is now being made, and in a few days men will be at work all the way from this village east. 

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Dec. 29, 1869

    Auburn Branch. - The workmen upon the New Berlin branch have nearly all been transferred by Messrs. Sage, Williams and Jerome, the contractors to the Auburn branch. They now have nearly 700 men at work on that contract, as well as a steam excavator at Crumb Hill, which is now or soon will be at work night and day. Work is progressing upon about a dozen sections.
    Messrs. S.W. and J. have proved themselves to be most thorough going, competent and reliable contractors, and our friends on the line of their work may rely upon “seeing day light” in the shortest possible space of time.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Dec. 31, 1869

    DeRuyter. - Our friends of the Midland were on hand in dye season for merry Christmas. On Thursday night one of them tipped over in front of Merchant’s store, and coming in connect with the stone steps dislocated his shoulder. Dr. McClellan put that all right. On Saturday some of them make a mistake and “gobbled” two overcoats and a pair of gloves from the Taber House. Officer Dusenbury found the gloves in a shanty on Crumb Hill on Sunday. 

Chenango Telegraph
 January 12, 1870

( In the "DeRuyter Items" column by Carl Von Schmidt ) 

  DeRuyter is getting somewhat ambitious. Not content with having the Auburn Branch of the Midland pass through our village, a large and very enthusiastic meeting of our classes was held at the Town Hall Dec. 30th, upon railroad matters. A.N. Annas Esq. was appointed Chairman, and I.M. Smith Secretary. Stray speeches were made and equally stray resolutions were passed favoring building the Utica and Elmira railroad through DeRuyter. Lewis Sears, I.N. Smith, and J.H. Delmater, were appointed a committee to correspond and call future meetings. 
   One thing is certain, DeRuyter is fifteen miles nearer than any other route that can be selected. Our people are determined to use every effort to secure the building of this road through DeRuyter. 
   The entire line of the Auburn branch of the Midland from DeRuyter to Norwich is literally covered with men and carts. Over 1,000 men are now at work on the line. Work will be commenced near the village the present week. All are made pleased with the action of the company in locating. Mr. Marcy is Division engineer at DeRuyter. He is a thorough engineer, and a gentleman withal.
    New Stage Route. - Wescott & King have established a new stage and mail route from Beaver Meadow to Norwich. They will leave Beaver Meadow at seven o'clock on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday mornings of  each week, reaching Norwich at noon, and leaving for Beaver Meadow at  three o'clock of the same day. They will have good teams and conveyances, and be prepared to carry passengers, as well as the mail, at reasonable rates. They will also do such errands as they shall be called upon to do and all in a satisfactory manner. They hope to receive, as they will try to deserve, a share of the public patronage. 

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, January 21, 1870

  The Midland is progressing rapidly. We were in error when we placed the number of men on the line between Norwich and DeRuyter at 1,000; over 1,200 are now employed between these points on the Auburn branch. The steam shovel is at work night and day.
   The steam saw mill on Crumb Hill is now in operation, sawing ties and timber for trestle work and bridges, and the company have already commenced getting wood for the engine. Sage, Williams & Jerome are confined of finishing their contract in ample season.

Syracuse Journal
Sat., January 22, 1870

    Railroad Enterprises -  We are assured that the branch of the Midland Railroad from Norwich to DeRuyter, will be completed by the first of September next. A thousand men are at work upon the route, and a thousand tons of iron have been purchased for the road.

Oneida Dispatch
January 28, 1870

    DeRuyter, which is now rapidly assuming an important position as a railroad center, is a village of 800 inhabitants, in the southwest corner of Madison County, adjoining Cortland County on the west (soon to be extended into Cortland county), and about two miles from the Chenango county line. DeRuyter now has an iron foundry, cheese box factory, candle factory, wagon shop, &c., but the wants of the place are but inadequately supplied.
    We need more mechanics, especially able of turning out the best work. Such an establishment would find DeRuyter the best point in Central New York. We also want a good cooper shop, a marble shop, and many other branches of industry would thrive here. But we have lawyers, doctors, and that class plenty now. 
    One good dry goods store is also needed, but in groceries we now have a dozen or two to spare, and if any one wishes to come her for the purpose of trade, we have already about as many stores as we need for some time to come. We are led to these remarks by the new aspect of things since work was commenced on our railroad.
    Some croakers contended that no one would come here on account of our heavy taxes. Real estate is firm and and selling well. Daniel Stillman has purchased the house land lot of Deacon Burdick on Cortland street. J.H. Delamater has purchased the house and lot of Philip Pledgers on Utica street. Galutin Walker has sold his farm to Dwight S. Parker, and his house and saw mill to Selah Root or rather he has exchanged with Mr. R., taking his farm in Russian America.
    The law firm of Miner & Kern have dissolved partnership. H.C. Miner is at the old office, on Albany street. L.B. Kern has fitted up an office one door north of the Taber House, in the rooms recently occupied by Sears & Russell. J.P. Fowler has moved his jewelry sip to the store of S.R. Stillman & Son. Rev. William J. Mills received nearly $100 at his donation visit last week. The Rev. S. Carver receives a donation visit at the town hall on Wednesday, Feb. 2. The Methodist church have received their new organ.
  The present winter is the most favorable for making railroads we had had for years, though our farmers are disposed to grumble of late on account of not having any sleighing yet. But when they see the rapid progress the railroad is making wisely concede that it is all right. Allen Sutton has moved his stock of goods to the building in the rear of the Scott block.
    We have plenty of whiskey in town this winter, and of course sometimes things are a little warm around town, a few cracked heads and broken noses are occasionally visible. Our sidewalks prove too narrow to admit of straight locomotion, but on the whole, so far, we get along as well as could be expected. One of our greatest needs we forgot to mention in enumerating the wants of DeRuyter. We want an experienced brick maker to come here. We need a large amount of brick for next season, and have excellent clay with which to manufacture  the same, and a good manufacturer, with sufficient capital, can find no better opening than DeRuyter.

Oneida Dispatch
January 18, 1870

    Georgetown. - We are not certain that it has been mentioned by us that a steam mill has been erected by Mr.  E.O. White on the portion of the Miller tract purchased by the Midland company  3 1/2 miles from here, and has now commenced operations.
    Having business that way we drove down into the woods to see it work and found it in good shape for business; everything seemed admirably arranged in the matter of machinery, with temporary buildings for the employees.
    They are at present working about 30 men and several teams. The timber is of the very vest in the country, which is being got into ties and timber. The men who run the mill appear to know their places and everything works systematically, and business is done with dispatch.
   If any one wishes to to see a steam mill who never saw one, and at the same time see a blackberry country, we guess it will pay. Having got thus far on our way, we thought best to take another lift, and after a time found ourselves on a little elevation which will pass into railroad history as “Crumb Hill.” Here a steam shovel is at work with all the faithfulness of a son of Erin, dipping into the earth as though it were digging for Chinamen, then lifting its load by powerful chains distended over pulleys attached to huge shafts, and swings the shovel around, and by the jerk of a rope by a man at the other end the dirt is dumped through the bottom of the bucket into the carts.
    It being a new thing for this section, many people vidi it daily from various quarters , coming to see the “giant” and truly it is a giant in strength and a curiosity in its modus operandi. It has now reached a depth of twenty feet or thirty feet at the summit  and ten or twelve rods wide. The earth near the top is considerably frozen and requires blasting.
    The bottom of the bank is a dark sandy loam, and has the appearance of quick sand; and at the end of the grade the point to which it is being moved where a heavy fill is required, we noticed considerable giving away, in the shape of a “land slide,” the sand oozing out and pouring down the hill like lava, or like “thick butter-milk.” Therefore we make look out for one of the “slides,” such as has visited the Midland proper.
    The deep cut here being made we should take to be about 150 rods in length. Gangs of men are to work on every section from here to the Otselic creek, which is as far as we went on the line, and we learn clear along, and we don’t see why it isn’t just as well as though we had “bonded,” that is, for us. 
Chenango Telegraph 
Feb. 2,1870 

   Work on the railroad goes right along and we have no doubt  that DeRuyter and Norwich will be be united by iron bands before 1871. Already increased activity in all business matters is felt. Real estate is firm, and business men are looking here to locate.

Chenango Union, Norwich
Feb. 9, 1870

   Depots on the Midland . - The Midland Company are erecting substantial depots at the different stations on the line of the Road, some of which are already completed. The one at Earlville, now being erected, is 20 by 30 feet, and is said to be the largest between Oneida and Norwich. The depot at this place will be a two-story building, but is not to be put up until spring.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Feb. 11, 1870

    DeRuyter. - Sage, Williams & Jerome are now laying iron rails on portions of their work. These rails are to remain to be re-laid in the permanent track. Nearly 400 men are at work now in this town alone on he Midland, and we learn more help is to be put on shortly. Horace Scott, Jr., is about to open a Midland Railroad hotel in Quaker Basin. Horace knows how to keep tavern, and will give satisfaction to his patrons.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Feb. 18, 1870

   Riot at the Polls in Otselic

    We learn that a serious disturbance occurred at the annual town meeting for the election of town officers, held at North Otselic, Chenango county, on Tuesday of this week. A brief general statement of is that a strong party of Irish employees on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland Railroad, presented themselves at the polls and claimed they had a right to vote.
    Being all strangers and new comers, whose stay was transient, very naturally their right to voted was question, besides it was strongly doubted whether many of them were naturalized, an consequently those offering to vote were challenged, whereupon a row followed, as it had for some days been threatened.
    The constable was called upon to quiet it, was overpowered, and driven from the house, and in fact from the vicinity.  The mob took possession of the ballot boxes, driving all away who had a right to vote unless it was a few they considered in their favor. We learn that Freeman Stanton, Esq., who was conspicuous in attempting to maintain order, was attacked by several, being struck being struck from behind, receiving  a serious wound on the head.
    Several others were knocked down. One young man by the name of Johnson, who was going up to the polls, supposing it was all clear, received a heavy blow. Revolvers were exhibited, and it was soon evident that matters would be word, for the mob had come there armed for the purpose, and had driven from the ballot box the citizens, with the view of usurping it themselves. 
   Consequently the polls were closed at 3 p.m., the vote which had been taken uncounted, and the assemblage was declared a mob. It is a notable fact that the legal course provided to show their right to vote was entirely disregarded, and also that none but the Republicans got hurt except in one case, where a Democrat was trying to run from the muss, he got a stick of wood in the back through mistake.
    This is decidedly a deplorable sate of things in a country town. Such things in New York city have frequently occurred, but when it comes to branch out into the country we may well conclude that the shadows of mobocracy was fast lengthening. When it comes to this, that native born citizens are driven from the polls by foreign born, it is time that every American should be awake o the situation to preserve the ballot box from the hands of ruffians.

Chenango Union, Norwich
Wed., Feb. 23, 1870

          The Disturbance in Otselic.               
     Quite a serious disturbance occurred in the town of Otselic on town-meeting day, which resulted in closing the polls about three o'clock in the afternoon. It appears that there are a large number of  men employed in that town on the Auburn Branch of the Midland, and about noon on the day of the town election, they presented themselves  at the polls to vote.  Each one as he presented his vote was challenged, and was compelled to swear it in. A gang of about a hundred men came from he works in a body, for the purpose of voting. Of course, so large a number crowded that polling place, and each one being challenged and compelled to swear in his vote, rendered the process of voting very slow.
     The Board in the meantime, as we are informed, continued to take  the ballots of such citizens as they knew, which exasperated the railroad men, who declared that they had arrived first at the polls and should all be disposed of before  any more votes were taken from old citizens. This was the signal for a general row, during which the  Board very properly closed the poles, which was done at about three o'clock in the afternoon.
     The above is a condensed statement of the affair as we have received it from a Republican resident of that town. Since it was written, we are informed that the disturbance began in an attempt by some of the Republicans to crowd the railroad men from the polls; and  that a prominent citizen drew a pistol, and pointed it at them, in a threatening manner. We abstain from comments until we are in possession of further particulars.
     The ballot box was properly taken care of and a member of the Board visited Norwich to get advice of what to do in regard to counting the votes. Judge Prindle advised that the votes be counted,  and it was done on Saturday last, showing a majority for the Republican candidate for Supervisor, of fifty.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Feb. 23, 1870

                                   Riot in Otselic!
                                        ____
The mob take possession of the Polls - Citizens beaten - Town Meeting
broken up - New York transferred to Otselic.
                         ____
    Otselic on Town meeting day was the scene of one of the most disgraceful and high-handed riots ever attempted in the rural districts. It was nothing less than an attempt to take possession of the polls and control the election by men who were entitled to no voice in the proceedings, who were not voters, and who, led and encouraged by unscrupulous leaders, native as well as foreign born, would have re-enacted the bloody riots of New York, had it not been for the firmness and decision of the board of officers who were presiding at the polls.
    The facts as near as we can get at them are as follows: Something over a hundred laborers are at work upon a section of the Midland near Otselic, and within the bounds of the town. Some half a dozen or more of the gang are voters and were entitled to exercise that privilege on Town meeting day in Otselic. The remainder of them were aliens who by reason of that and non-residence in the county, were not entitled to vote.
    For two weeks previous to the Town meeting the Democrats had made no secret of the fact that they intended to carry the Otselic Town meeting, and that they relied upon that force of laborers to overcome the lawful Republican majority, and place the town in Democratic control.  The leaders of the gang went so far as to take counsel as to the right of the men to vote, and when informed that they were not legal voters, and would not be allowed to do so, insisted with oaths that they had the power if not the right that every man should vote.
    All went on quietly on Town meeting day until noon. About twenty of their new comers in that town had been allowed to vote upon their giving satisfactory answer to the questions put upon challenge. A few votes had been rejected. About two o’clock the officers were confronted with the entire force, led on by one or two whose votes had been refused, with the demand that their votes be taken. On being informed by the board that their case so far as they were concerned was closed and would not be re-opened, the crowd then declared that “not another Republican vote should be deposited until they (the rioters) had all voted,” and proceeded at once to enforce that determination by taking possession of the window at which the votes were being taken.
   From this time they would not go away, except when a Democratic voter came in sight he was rushed up to the polls, and after voting, if possible was made one of the riotous crowd. When Republicans attempted to reach the polls, they were forcibly driven away and not allowed to vote. From this time all the usual legal ways of showing themselves to be voters were disregarded, and wholly ignored by the mob. This state of things continued until about half past two, when a fight attracted the crowd and one or two Republicans obtained access to the polls and voted, on discovering which the mob again surged towards the polls closing up and entirely blocking them, clubs wee freely used upon Freeman Stanton, H.M. Brown, Mr. Johnson and others, who were all more or less injured.
    One young man, a Democrat was mistaken for a Republican and beaten down, and had his watch stolen. It is proper perhaps to state that he has had enough of such “friends.” One of the officers of the town, drew his revolver when pressed by the crowd, and was met by one facing him in the hands of the “walking boss” of the gang. At 3 P.M. through the force of the mob voting was entirely suspended, and the board were threatened with serious injury to say the least; and under the circumstances they could do no otherwise than declare the polls closed. So great was the force of the mob however, and having no power to enforce their rights, the board left the place with the ballots uncounted.
    The box however was sealed up and placed in the hands of the town Clerk Silas R. Hill Esq. for safe keeping. The next day the board came to this village and upon being advised by proper counsel returned to Otselic  and counted the votes and declared the result which will be found in its appropriate place.
    These are the facts of this high handed attempt, we give them as we receive them, having full faith in their truthfulness. Basing their action upon them the board acted perfectly right, indeed they could do no other way than they did.
    We forebear comment for we understand the matter is now in the hands of the Grand Jury now in session in this village. Judge Boardman very properly called the attention of that body to the matter. They will enquire into it fully, and act upon such facts as may come before them. If they find that a crime has been perpetrated, and there can be no doubt of it if the above are the substantial facts, they will say so, and the violators of the law all find that in the country at least the Judicial ermine is unsullied by contamination with ore reliance upon repeaters and illegal votes.

Chenango Union
Wed., March 9, 1870

    The Branch Railroads -  It is said that the branch of the Midland Railroad from this place to DeRuyter will be completed by the first of September next. A thousand men are at work upon the route, and a thousand tons of iron have been purchased for the road. 
    The track on the New Berlin Branch is laid to a point about one mile north of the Latham Stand, in Guilford. Track-laying is discontinued for the present, and the forces are engaged in ballasting the road as far as laid.

Chenango Union
Wed., March 30, 1870

   The DeRuyter Branch - Work has commenced on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland, in this village, on the hill in the vicinity of Miller Street. The road is to cross North Main Street, taking out the residents of James G. Thompson and Andrew Haxton. Many of the parties owning property through which the road is to run, have settled with the Company for damages. Mr. Haxton, we believe, receives $7,000. The abutments for the railroad bridge across the canal, north of Mitchell Street, are being constructed. Work on the DeRuyter end of the route is rapidly going forward, and a large amount of grading on the line is already completed.
    We copy from an Oneida Dispatch correspondent: 
   "On Saturday the laborers on the railroad struck for higher wages. They had been receiving $1.50 per day; they now demand $2 per day. The village was full of the laborers on Saturday, but everything was peaceable and no one is yet allowed to go to work. Speaking of the railroad, Mr. Morey, the resident engineer, informs us that the grading on the Norwich and DeRuyter branch can easily be finished by the first of July next, and that the bridges and trestle work will now be pushed forward with vigor. The strike is only regarded as of temporary continuance; but the Cazenovia Republican says that the whole thing has gone up. Well, so be it, but we cannot see it, and are well assured that before October 1st, 1870, regular trains will be running to DeRuyter."

Chenango Telegraph
April 13, 1870
     DeRuyter - Work on our railroad has progressed slowly for a fortnight. The breaking up of winter impedes the work some. Sage, Williams and Jerome are re-organizing the work on sections 25 and 26 abandoned by E. R. Esmond. These sections are now under the supervision of Col. B.W. Pratt, a gentleman every way qualified  to manage matters successfully. 

Rome Sentinel
April 19, 1870 
    
    Cost of DeRuyter Branch up to March 11, 1870 was $98,852.79 according to President Littlejohn’s statement on condition of the N.Y. O.& M. 

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, April 29, 1870

    The railroad steam shovel is now located on the land of Dwight S. Parker. About 30 men are constantly employed around the saw mill.


Cazenovia Republican
April 30, 1870

    DeRuyter - The Irish laborers on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland railroad are enjoying a strike means to quit work, get drunk, and strike and left - everything within striking distance. 
    Many of our towns-people have been so swindled and defrauded by railed jobbers and such fellows, that the losses they have thereby suffered are irreparable to men of small means, and families in moderate circumstances.
    In numerous instances, hundreds of dollars incurred for boarding and feed for team and hands during the winter past, have been left unpaid, by these unprincipled scamps.

Chenango Union
Wed., May 4, 1870

The DeRuyter Branch -  We notice that it is reported in certain localities that work is suspended on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland. The trouble commenced, we believe, among the laborers on the Esmond contract - the contractors having abandoned their job, leaving the laborers in the lurch. Messrs. Sage, Williams & Jerome, however, have satisfactorily arranged matters. 

Chenango Union
Wed., May 4, 1870

    The Branch. -  Work upon the DeRuyter Branch, in this vicinity, is progressing favorably. The work of excavating east from Miller Street, towards North Main, is going forward, the earth removed being used in constructing an embankment across the flats on the west. The cut where the workmen are at present employed, is about eight feet in depth. 
    The frame work to the bridge across the canal is nearly up, and the trestle work to connect with the bridge on both sides will soon be in position. The trestle will cross Silver Street, at the Fair Ground, at a height of about eight feet above the street. 
    The strike at DeRuyter is said to be over, and the hands preparing to resume work. It is understood that about fourteen shillings per day will be paid for labor.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., May 11, 1870

    DeRuyter -  Our railroad has been written as entirely abandoned and so published, but truth compels me to say that the man who published that story was either drunk or crazy. The strike is now over and most of the men have resumed work. The steam saw-mill belonging to the railroad has been moved from Crumb Hill to W.S. Parker's and is now cutting out timber fast; 25 men are employed about the mill. 
    Preparations are being made to build our depot. The building is to cost $6,000, of which sum the village of DeRuyter pays one half. We shall have an elegant depot. -  Carl Von Schmidt 

Chenango Union
Wed., May 11,1870

    The DeRuyter correspondent of the Oneida Dispatch writes as follows: 
"Our railroad, we now learn, will be entirely abandoned about the first of September next - by the contractors. The strike is now fully over, and the men have mostly resumed work. Work on the trestle portion is now commenced, and the steam shovel will be in operation the present week. 
   "Will the editors of the Oswego Times and Syracuse Standard come to DeRuyter and see some three hundred men at work on our road? Then they may be convinced that it is abandoned - over the left."

Chenango Union
Sat., May 14, 1870

    The Branch - Work upon the DeRuyter Branch in this vicinity, is progressing favorably. The work of excavating east from Miller Street towards North Main, is going forward, the earth removed being used in constructing an embankment across the flats on the west. The cut where the workmen are at present employed is about eight feet in depth.  
    The framework to the bridge across the canal is nearly up and the trestle work to connect with the bridge on both sides will soon be in position. The trestle will cross Silver Street at the Fair Ground at a   height of about eight feet above the street. The strike at DeRuyter is said to be over and the hands prepared to resume work. It is understood about fourteen shillings a day will be paid for labor.

Chenango Union
Wed., May 17, 1870

  Work on the Auburn branch is being vigorously prosecuted. The cut through from Miller Street is approaching the rear of the Thompson Lot, and the late residence of the County Clerk is "on the move" to another lot on the north side of the cut, on Miller Street.

Chenango Union
Wed., May 25, 1870

   Stephen Puffer, of this village, has taken the contract to build trestle-bridge No. 2, Section 1, on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland. This bridge is situated in Norwich Village. 
   Moving Buildings. -  L.J. Weaver, of Pitcher, has been engaged during the past week in moving the late residence of J.G. Thompson from North Main across the lots in the rear, to Miller Street, to make way for the Midland Branch. The house, which is of itself a very heavy one, was moved entire - wing, chimneys and windows - and not a light of glass was broken, not a brick or plastered wall disturbed. 
    He has been visited by many of our citizens, during the time, who were curious to see how the thing was done; and all are satisfied that Mr. Weaver thoroughly understands his business. He will this week move the Haxton house from its present location to one on the south side of the lot. One of the chimneys in this house is a very large one, but it is to be moved with the building. 
    Parties wishing work of this kind successfully done, will do well to address Mr. Weaver, at Pitcher.

Chenango Union
Wed., June 1, 1870


Now nearly 1,000 men are at work on the Branch between DeRuyter and Norwich. The steam excavator on Crumb Hill is actively at work. The steam sawmill at DeRuyter is cutting about 25,000 feet of lumber in 24 hours. The grading is three fourths done, and we can reasonably expect the cars by Sept.  1.

Syracuse Daily Standard
Monday, June 6, 1870

    The Oneida Democratic Union has the following notice of operations on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland Railroad:
     "The story of the abandonment of the DeRuyter branch of the Midland railroad was doubtless started by parties in the interest of the Cincinnatus route of the Elmira road. Now nearly one thousand men are at work between DeRuyter and Norwich. The steam excavator on Crumb Hill is actively at work. The steam saw-mill in DeRuyter is cutting out about 25,000 feet of lumber in twenty-four hours. The grading is three-fourths done, and we can reasonably expect the cars by Sept. 1.

Chenango Union
Wed., June 15, 1870

    To-day (Wednesday) trains on the Midland commence running through from Oswego to Sidney Plains. Work on the DeRuyter Branch is progressing finely. The cut from Miller Street in this village, through to North Main Street, is going on well, and the fill across the lots west has reached Pleasant Street. Three bridges have been erected across the Canasawacta, and the fourth is now going up. The timber for the trestle work on the corporation is being drawn to it's place, and will soon be raised.  
The DeRuyter correspondent of the Oneida Dispatch writes as follows:  
    "Hon. D.C. Littlejohn, President of the Midland Railroad, Wm. Foster, Esq., member of the Executive Committee, W. B. Gilbert, Esq., Chief Engineer, came to town with Hon. J.W. merchant, on Friday evening of last week. They went to Truxton on Saturday to examine matters in reference to extending the road west from DeRuyter. The party returned to DeRuyter Saturday P.M.  
    "The DeRuyter Brass Band, accompanied by several of our leading citizens, gave Mr. Littlejohn a serenade on Saturday evening. Mr. Littlejohn, after repeated calls, appeared and was introduced to the people by Hon. J.W. Merchant. He thanked the citizens of DeRuyter for the complement paid to him and also to the other directors. He referred to the progress of the Midland, to the distance now completed, and to the amount of work already done between Sidney and New York City.  
    "He also spoke of Gov. Hoffman's veto of the Aid Bill, congratulated the citizens of DeRuyter on their being the first to bond for the Midland, and now were about to real the benefit of their investment for the present autumn would bring the iron horse into our midst from Norwich. Mr. Littlejohn further said that the great work would not stop here but would extend westward piercing the western counties of the State, and terminating on the shores of Lake Erie.  
    "That through DeRuyter would be the great highway of commerce from the West to the East. Closing, by again thanking the citizens for the compliment paid, he retired amid the enthusiastic cheers of the assembled throng. Work on the railroad is progress as fast as possible. On Saturday the steam shovel moved six feet, cutting the entire track that distance. Crumb Hill is now two-thirds graded."
Chenango Union
Wed., June 22, 1870
   
                           Midland Items
                                 ____
    Work upon the depot in this village presses, the brick walls being completed, and the timber for the roof in its place. The building is 50 x 100 feet, two stories in height, and will be an imposing structure when completed.
    The work upon the DeRuyter Branch, in this village, is being pushed rapidly. Cutting was commenced on Wednesday last, on the east side of the hill between North Main and Miller Streets, in front of where the residence of J.G. Thompson stood, so that two gangs of hands are employed in excavating - one on the east and one on the west end of the cut. There will be no cut across North Main Street, the road at that point being at grade. The trestle work is going up.
    The town of Cuyler, Cortland Co., which was never fully bonded for railroad purposes, has now about completed her bonding at $80,000. We are assured that as soon as Cuyler is bonded the contract will be let to extend the Midland, the present fall, from DeRuyter to Truxton.

Chenango Telegraph
Monday, June 27, 1870

    On Saturday evening the first train on the Auburn branch was seen crossing North Main Street, Norwich.

Hamilton Democratic Republican
Tuesday, June 28, 1870

   Work on the DeRuyter branch goes forward rapidly. On Saturday evening the first train was seen to cross North Main Street in Norwich. It's approach was announced by the locomotive bell, when it reached the center of the street there was a halt followed by a loud whistle. On Monday the construction train progressed even further.

Chenango Union
Wed., June 29, 1870

    Work on the Auburn Branch is progressing favorably in this locality. The cut from Miller to North Main Street is nearly completed, the trestle work from North Main Street east is going up, and the construction trains are busily at work upon filling at the junction with the main line.

Chenango Union,
Wednesday, July 6, 1870

Midland Items 

    The cut between Miller and North Main Streets, on the Auburn Branch, is completed as is also the trestle work east from the canal bridge, nearly across the old Fair Grounds, from east of where a fill connects the branch with the main line. The bridge over Silver Street is of wood, but it is understood the company have agreed to erect an iron structure in its place within five years. 
    The passenger depot in this village rapidly approaches completion. Last week, the gas fixtures were put in by a company from Oswego, and the work of putting on the slate roofing has commenced.

 Oswego Commercial Advertiser
Friday, July 1, 1870

    Steam Excavator. - The second of those mammoth steam excavators, or “steam Irishmen” as they are dubbed by the boys on the railroad, patented by Messrs. Sage and Algier, contractors on the Midland Railroad, is about completed at the machine shop of Messrs. J. King & Co., in this city, and will be ready to be put in operation on the Midland this week. The machine is of massive construction, with heavy works, and the frame is set on wheels to run on a temporary track as its excavation progresses.
    It has two engines, of about twenty-five horse power, which operate a shovel, capable of removing about one and a half yards of earth at each dip, and which ordinarily makes about two dips a minute. At this rate the machine will excavate  900 yards of earth in a day of ten hours, and is labor is therefore equal to that of a gang of 90 men. The excavator requires the attendance of only three men, an engineer, fireman, and manager, and the one already in operation has proved a complete success in the work on the Midland, being now employed at Sidney Plains. It is capable of working its way steadily though any description of clay and gravel.

Chenango Union
Wed., July 6, 1870

    The cut between Miller and North Main Streets, on the Auburn branch, is completed, as is also the trestle work east from the canal bridge, nearly across the old fairgrounds, from the east end of which a fill connects the branch with the main line.
    The bridge over Silver Street is of wood, but it is understood that the company have agreed to erect an iron structure in its place within five years. 
    The passenger depot in this village rapidly approaches completion. Last week, the gas fixtures were put in by a company from Oswego, and the work of putting on the slate roofing has commenced.

Chenango Union
Wed., July 13, 1870

    The DeRuyter correspondent of the Oneida Dispatch says of railroading in that vicinity: “The steam shovel averaged seventeen feet a day last week. Crumb Hill is fast becoming the back bone problem. On Wednesday of the present week, Engineer Rock commenced the survey of the Truxton extension of the Midland. Track is being laid on the DeRuyter branch at Norwich and the locomotive “DeRuyter” is on the track.”

Chenango Union
July 17, 1870

    On Saturday evening last, the first locomotive crossed North Main Street, with a construction train the trestle-work being completed, and track laid from the junction to a short distance west of the crossing. A large number of our citizens assembled to witness the advent of the iron horse upon the Auburn Branch; and as it steamed over the long trestle-work, commencing in the old Fair Ground, and came screaming high above Silver Street, and across the canal, striking terra firma near the crossing of the street, it was a novel sight.  
    Work is progressing rapidly between this place and DeRuyter. It is understood that the towns of Cuyler and Truxton, in Cortland County, are bonded for the road.
    DeRuyter -  The work of bonding Cuyler and Truxton is now completed and papers filed. Henry D. Waters, Benj. Brown and Charles W. Brown are the Commissioners for Cuyler; and A.L. Kinney, S. Goddard and C. Stevens for Truxton. It is now generally believed that the road will pass through DeRuyter village, just north of DeRuyter Institute, and that the depot will be located near Tioughnioga Street. The pile driving is progressing rapidly, one of the pile drivers being down in Mrs. Harvey's lot, and the work of driving piles will be begun in the village as soon as it can be laid out. 
    The trestle work goes up, it seems, almost like magic, and the grading is being pushed along.   

Carl Von Schmidt 

Chenango Telegraph
July 20, 1870

    Midland Branch. - The trestle work on the Auburn Branch from the main line to the cut west of North Main St. is now completed. Sub-grading and sloping of the sides of the cut is also finished, and ties are being rapidly laid. In a short time track laying will be resumed and we soon expect to see a locomotive cross  Main Street on its way to DeRuyter. The work of grading and bridging to that place is nearly done. September is coming, and the officers must hurry up if they get the Iron Horse to DeRuyter in that month.
    Murder in DeRuyter. -  On Saturday morning July 16, at half-past six o'clock, the body of Dennis Griffin, a workman on the Midland Railroad, was found in a pit on Section 26, about two and a half miles east of DeRuyter village. When found the body lay on its face, about three and a half feet from the side of the pit, which is twelve and a half feet deep, the head towards the south side of the pit. 
    The back part of the skull, in a line even with the upper portion, or ear, was completely crushed in, evidently by a heavy blow, and there was a slight contusion on the face, near the eye. A.V. Bentley, Esq., acting as Coroner, summoned a jury. Drs. Spencer and Mudge testified as to the injuries. It was proven that the deceased passed Scott's Hotel about 9 o'clock the evening previous, and a few moments later another man passed in the same direction, walking faster than Griffin. 
    This was the last seen of the deceased. It was known that Griffin had some fifty or sixty dollars in his possession. Four cents only were found on the body. The verdict of the jury was that deceased came to his death from causes to them unknown. The pit where the body was found was about one half mile from the highway, and was not in the usual path  to Griffin's boarding place. Griffin had spent the day in the village endeavoring to collect a debt. 
    He was an intemperate man. The position of the body, the blow on the back of the head, the fact of his money being gone, all prove conclusively that he met his death by foul means. A good deal of excitement exists over the matter in DeRuyter, especially in the immediate neighborhood, and the opinion is universal that he was murdered. 
Chenango Union
Wed., July 27, 1870

             Murder in DeRuyter. - On Saturday morning July 16, at half-past six o’clock, the body of Dennis Griffin, a workman on the Midland Railroad, was found in a pit on section 26, about two and a half miles east of DeRuyter village. When found the body lay on its face, about three and a half feet from the side of the pit, which is twelve and a half feet deep, the head towards the south side of the pit. The back part of the skull, in a line even with the upper portion, or ear, was completely crushed in, evidently by a heavy blow, and there was a slight contusion on the face, near the eye.
    A.V. Bentley, Esq., acting as Coroner, summoned a jury. Drs. Spencer and Mudge testified as to the injuries. It was proven that the deceased passed Scott’s Hotel about 9 o’clock the evening previous, and a few moments later another man passed in the same direction, walking faster than Griffin. This was the last seen of the deceased. It was known that Griffin had some fifty or sixty dollars in his possession. Four cents only were found on his body. The verdict of the jury was that deceased came to his death from causes to them unknown.
    The pit where the body was found was about one half mile from the highway, and was not in the usual path of Griffin’s boarding place. Griffin had spent the day in the village endeavoring to collect a debt. He was an intemperate man. The position of the body, the blow on the back part of the head, the fact of his money being gone, all prove conclusively that he met his death by foul means. 
    A god deal of excitement exists over the matter in DeRuyter, especially in the immediate neighborhood, and the opinion is universal that he was murdered.

Chenango Union
Wed., July 27, 1870

                 Railroad Matters
                      ____
    The freight depot in this village is completed and occupied by the company - the temporary shanty formerly used having been demolished. The roofing upon the passenger depot is completed and the floors are being laid, partitions set, and siding going on. The tracks for some distance have been raised a foot or more, and ballasted, while the rubbish which had accumulated in front of the new depot buildings is cleared way, and the ground properly graded - the whole presenting a decidedly improved appearance.
    Considerable improvement has of late been made at the round-house, the turn-table having been thoroughly overhauled and rendered serviceable, floors laid, and the outside of the building painted.
    On Saturday evening last, the first locomotive crossed North Main Street, with a construction train, the trestle-work being complied, and track laid from the junction to a short distance west of the crossing. A large number of our citizens assembled to witness the advent of the iron horse upon the Auburn Branch; and as it steamed over the long trestle-work, commencing in the old Fair Ground, and came screaming high above Silver Street, and across the canal, striking terrafirma near the crossing of the street, it was a novel sight.
    Work is progressing rapidly between this and DeRuyter. It is understood that the towns of Cuyler and Truxton, in Cortland County, are bonded for the road.
    The New Berlin branch will be opened to the public about August 1st. The Company is constructed a telegraph line on the branch, and it will be in operation on or before the above date. Mr. Orrin Field has been appointed agent at New Berlin.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., July 27, 1870

   Murder in DeRuyter. - A laborer on the railroad at DeRuyter named Dennis Griffin was found dead on the 16th, in a pit 12 feet deep and at quite a distance from the ordinary path he would take. An investigation has been made by a coroner, but no evidence was elicited to throw any light on the subject. The suspicion was strong that he was murdered. He had $23 in money which was missing, and a blow on the back part of his head are strong evidence are strong circumstances to show that there was foul play.
(same paper)
    Progress. - The work on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland goes forward rapidly. On Saturday evening the first train was seen to cross North Main Street. Its approach was announced by the locomotive bell, and when it reached the center of the street there was a halt followed by a loud whistle. On Monday the construction train progressed still further. These progressive steps admonish ups that before many months the line to DeRuyter will be in operation.

Chenango Union
Wed., July 27, 1870

    Murder in DeRuyter. - On Saturday morning July 16, at half-past six o’clock, the body of Dennis Griffin, a workman on the Midland Railroad, was fund in a pit on section 26, about two and a half miles east of DeRuyter village. When found the body lay on its face, about three and a half feet from the side of the pit, which is twelve and a half feet deep, the head towards the south side of the pit.
    The back part of the skull, in a line even with the upper portion, or ear, was completely crushed in, evidently by a heavy blow, and there was a slight contusion on the face near the eye. A.V. Bentley, Esq., acting as Coroner, summoned a jury. Drs. Spencer and Mudge testified as to the injuries. It was proven that the deceased passed Scott’s Hotel about 9 o’clock the evening previous, and a few moments later another man passed in the same direction, walking faster than Griffin.
    This was the last seen of the deceased. It was known that Griffin had some fifty or sixty dollars in his possession. Four cents only were found on the body. The verdict of the jury was that the deceased came to his death from causes to them unknown. The pit where the body was found was about one half mile from the highway, and was not the usual path to Griffin’s boarding place.
    Griffin had spent the day in the village endeavoring to collect a debt. He was an intemperate man. The position of the body, the blow on the back part of the head, the fact of is money being gone, all prove conclusively that he met his death by foul means. A good deal of excitement exists over the matter in DeRuyter, especially in the immediate neighborhood, and the opinion is universal that he was murdered.

Chenango Union
Aug. 3, 1870

    The people of the towns of Truxton and Cuyler, Cortland county, are congratulating themselves that they are soon to have the DeRuyter branch of the Midland Railroad constructed through their respective towns.
    The engineers finished its location as far as Truxton village the 13th inst. The road as now locoed crosses the river some thirty rods south of the State’s Bridge, in Cuyler, passes into the town of Truxton through the farm of Alvah Risley, Esq., on the north side of the river, to Truxton village. Distance from DeRuyter to Truxton is nine miles.
    The course of this road from Truxton west to Auburn is not fully determined. There are three routes from Truxton to Auburn, each supposed to be nearly equal distance, and feasible in construction. One by Tully, one by Homer and Scott, and one by Cortland.
    The Tully Republican urges the citizens of that town to bond the town and aid in the construction of the Midland branch from Truxton to Tully and Skaneateles, and concludes an argumentative article on the question of bonding, as follows: “Give us the Midland Railroad and we venture to say that Tully in five years after the road is in running order, will rival Cortland, and farms which are only $200 per acre now, will then sell readily at twice that sum.”
     
Chenango Telegraph
August 3, 1870

    The track-layers on the DeRuyter Branch are “pushing things.” During the past week, iron has been laid from this village to the farm of Col. Frink, in Plymouth.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Aug. 5, 1870

    It now seems to be definitely settled that the railroad will fall just south of the Utica Street Bridge, and just north of DeRuyter Institute, and that the depot will be near Tioughnioga street. The work of putting up the trestle in the Wibert Gorge will commence the present week. Crumb Hill, that terrible bugbear, the name of which in some places has been used to give children a better idea of mountains than either the Alps or Andes, is nearly finished, but a few days more and it will be all graded.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Aug. 12, 1870

    DeRuyter. - The contract for the extension of the Midland Railroad west from DeRuyter is let to Sage. Williams & Jerome. We are glad that these gentlemen are to have the contract, for they are men of sterling integrity, and of great energy, and we can rely confidently that they will have the grading done in ample season. The line is determined, and will fall, as we anticipated, west of the Utica street bridge, and between the houses of Mrs. Wells and Mrs. Scott.
    The depot will undoubtedly near Tioughnioga street. Work will be commenced on the Truxton extension just as soon as the engineers can lay the work out. The track layers are now about four miles from Norwich, towards DeRuyter. 

Chenango Union
Tuesday, Aug. 16, 1870

   DeRuyter -  The correspondent of the Oneida Dispatch writes of railroad matters in DeRuyter as follows: 
 "The contract for the extension of the Midland Railroad west from DeRuyter is let to Sage, Williams & Jerome. We are glad that those gentlemen are to have the contract, for they are men of sterling integrity, and of great energy, and we can rely confidently that they will have the grading done in ample season. The line is determined, and will fall, as we anticipated, west of the Utica street bridge, and between the houses of Mrs. Wells and Mrs. Scott. The depot will undoubtedly be near Tioughnioga street. Work will be commenced on the Truxton extension just as soon as the engineers can lay the work out."

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Aug. 17, 1870

    DeRuyter -  At last we have the pleasure of announcing the cheering news that the cut on Crumb Hill is through; all that is now to be done is to slope the banks and even down the grade. Crumb Hill could not be graded. Only thirteen months of work and the grading is done. The engineers are now laying out work on the Truxton extension. Sage, Williams & Jerome are the contractors and of course our people are glad to have them engage this work, for we know that they are men of untiring energy. -  Carl Von Schmidt 

Chenango Union
Aug. 17, 1870

   They are “pushing things” on the Auburn Branch.  By today (Wednesday,) the track-layers have reached Plymouth, a distance of 8 miles from this village. The abutments for all the bridges, twenty-seven in number, are completed, and several of the bridges finished.
   Work at DeRuyter is progressing. Already the daylight shines through the terrible Crumb Hill. The work between DeRuyter and Truxton, on the west, has been let to Messrs. Sage, Williams & Jerome. 
   Tracklayers have reached Plymouth, eight miles. Twenty-seven abutments for bridges to DeRuyter are completed.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Aug. 19, 1870

    DeRuyter.- Work has been commenced the present week on the Midland extension in the towns of Cuyler and Truxton. The cut at Crumb Hill is finished through, and the work of sloping the banks and cutting down to grade will take but a short time. The pile driver will be at work in the village next week.

Syracuse Daily Standard
 Aug. 19, 1870

    The tracklayers on the Auburn branch of the Midland railroad have reached Plymouth, eight miles from Norwich. The abutments for all the bridges finished. Work near DeRuyter is progressing favorably, and the daylight shines though the terrible Crumb Hill. The work between DeRuyter and Truxton, has been let to Messrs. Sage, Williams & Jerome.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Aug. 24, 1870

A Painful Accident 
    On Saturday evening as the work train on the DeRuyter Branch was crossing Miller street, bringing along several of the laborers, one of them named Martin Gallagher, who lives a short distance west of the Catholic church, jumped off in order to save a long walk to his residence. He was on the rear car, and in jumping struck his left foot on the side of the cattle guard on the north side of the street, and fell across the guard, breaking the left limb close to the ankle, so that the bones protruded. 
    He also appeared to have hurt his side in falling. The unfortunate man was laid upon a door and carried home, Dr. Avery meantime being called to set the broken limb. Mr. Gallagher depended upon his daily earnings to support his family, consisting of a wife and several children, but it will be a long time before he can resume labor. No doubt thee are many who will esteem it a privilege to see that a family thus providentially deprived of support is properly and kindly cared for.    
Accidents in Plymouth 
    A serious accident happened in Plymouth on Wednesday last. In or near the village a cattle pass, under the railroad track was being put in, and a man named Van Husen, a carpenter by trade, was engaged in the work when one of the bents, some eight feet high, fell against him, severely injuring him and breaking two or three ribs. The accident rendered him helpless and he had to be carried to his boarding house. The most severe injuries being internal it is difficult to determine whether they are likely to prove a permanent disability. 
    Another accident happened from the running away of a team which took fright at the passing of the construction train. The team belonged to Mr. Daniel Cushman, who was thrown or dragged from the wagon and considerably injured.

Syracuse Standard
Aug. 22, 1870

  A DeRuyter correspondent speaking of the branch of the Midland which is being built to that place says: -
    The line of the railroad through DeRuyter village, we learn,has been definitely settled. It passes a point just south of the north bridge, on Utica street, skirting the edge of the pond, running between the residences of Mrs. Delos Wells and Mrs. Scott. The depot is not finally located, but will doubtless be on the flat west of DeRuyter Institute, somewhere net what is known as the stock company road. 

Syracuse Journal
Thurs., Aug. 25, 1870

    A meeting of the Board of Directors of the Midland Railroad Co. was held at Oneida on the 20th inst., when the following resolutions were adopted: 
Resolved, That the construction of this road is so far advanced as to justify the immediate extension of the line from Truxton to Auburn; and to this end be it further 
    Resolved, That the President and Engineer be directed to examine the intermediate country and make further surveys of the same, and that the Executive Committee, after examining the same, be and are hereby authorized to locate the road upon the best line taking into consideration grade, business and means furnished for construction. 
Cazenovia Republican
Wed., Aug. 31, 1870

                               DeRuyter.
    The operation of driving spiles for the trestle work on the Midland, where it crosses the Tioughnioga creek in DeRuyter village, has commenced. The pegs thus driven into the ground vary from 12 to 18 inches in diameter, and are 40 feet in length.
   An auction sale of horses, dirt-cars, heavy harnesses, etc., took place here Friday last, upon foreclosure of a mortgage on property which had ben used on the railroad. The sale included ten horse-frames and other “togrol.”
    The track layers on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland road from Norwich have reached the Beaver Meadow, near North Otselic, and are rapidly approaching DeRuyter with the iron rails.
    The denizens of this village were disturb, last Saturday night, at a late hour, by a concert of drunken rowdies, yelling, screaming, swearing, cursing, and tearing around.
    Saturday morning, the 27th inst., a white frost was observed in different localities in this vicinity, but not sufficiently sharp to do serious harm.
    Mr. George W. Haight is about to open a business in the grocery and hardware trade near the corner of Lincklaen and Cortland streets, in the block known as the Mansion House, in this village. Mr. Haight has the advantages which familiarity and experience in the business furnish and the confidence and good-will of the comity to insure success in his undertaking.
    Much embarrassment is experienced here for want of tenements for business places and families. So great is the evil as to operate as a serious check to the increase of population and business. Twenty new buildings are wanted immediately. A respectable family wishing to settle here endeavored for four weeks to find suitable rooms to rent, and a gentleman desirous to establish a printing press and newspaper is unable to obtain a place either for his family or office. Those who might accommodate show little disposition to do so, and capitalists having the means manifest no purpose to put up new buildings. Still it is expected DeRuyter will some day be a large railroad town. Gentlemen! Please stand along down and make more room!


Chenango Union
August 31, 1870

    Work upon the Auburn branch, between this village and DeRuyter, is being vigorously prosecuted. The rails are laid to a point some five miles beyond Plymouth - a distance of thirteen miles from this place.
    Messrs. Sage, Williams & Jerome have commenced work upon the line between DeRuyter and Truxton, upwards of forty teams being employed.
   The Oswego Times of the 25th says of the workshops in that city: "The work shops of the Midland Railroad Company in this city have been occupied by mechanics, and this week the construction of fifty new coal cars has been commenced. The machinery is of the most improved kind, very extensive.
    The construction of two large snow plows is commenced. The work of the car shop is under the direction of Mr. D.T. Day, formerly in the employ of the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg Railroad Company in the same capacity. In the machine shop about thirty men have been employed, in repairing engines, manufacturing iron for the DeRuyter Branch, and iron for the new cars. The timber used in the new cars is Georgia pine and Chenango county oak. Mr. O. Haines, formerly of the Rome & Watertown Railroad is foreman of the machine shop. 

Madison Observer, Morrisville
Wednesday, Sept. 7, 1870

    DeRuyter. - The operation of driving spiles for the trestle work on the Midland, where it crosses Tioughnioga creek in DeRuyter village, has commenced. The pegs thus driven into the ground vary from 12 to 18 inches in diameter, and are 40 feet in length.
    The track-layers on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland road from Norwich have already reached the Beaver Meadow, near North Otselic, and are rapidly approaching DeRuyter with the iron rails.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Sept. 9, 1870

    Our railroad rack is laid to Beaver Meadows, 14 mile from Norwich. It is now nearer to the  DeRuyter track than to any point from DeRuyter. Probably the track layers will reach the crossing of Otselic Creek the present week.  Every exertion is being made to give us the cars this fall and we have no doubt that in 90 days a train of cars will be in DeRuyter. West of us work is being pushed along. Mr. Wilcox, sub-contractor, commenced work on Section 19, on Monday, near the DeRuyter Cheese Factory. 


Chenango Union
Wed., Sept. 14, 1870

    The Branch Railroad. - The DeRuyter correspondent of the Oneida Dispatch writes last week as follows:
    "Our railroad is laid to Beaver Meadow, 14 miles from Norwich. It is now nearer to the DeRuyter track than to any point from DeRuyter. Probably the track layers will reach the crossing of the Otselic Creek the present week. Every exertion is being made to give u the cars this fall and we have no doubt that in 90 days a train of cars will be in DeRuyter. West of us work is being pushed along. Mr. Wilcox, sub-contractor, commenced work on Section 29, on Monday, near the DeRuyter Cheese Factory."

Chenango Telegraph
Sept. 14, 1870

    DeRuyter. - We realize the fact that the day is fast approaching  when we shall have communication with Norwich and the outside world by rail.
    The steam shovel now under the superintendence of Col. W.W. Rexford and Major Alger, is doing an immense amount of work. The trestle is fast being put up … The Wibert trestle will be finished as soon as this piece is in type. Ive’s trestle is 75 feet in height and of course one of the most difficult of any on the line.
    The grading is now being done in the village, and the piles are being driven across the Tioughnioga River and the driver is not putting down piles in the village. Work has commenced immediately west of the village on section 29. In Cuyler and Truxton everything is being pushed forward as fast as possible.
                              Carl Von Schmidt.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Sept. 16, 1870

   Mr. Wilcox, sub-contractor on Section 39 of the Midland railroad, has now at work, a self-loading and self-emptying wagon which to us, is quite a novelty. It is easily managed and seems to work well.  

Chenango Union
Friday, Sept. 21, 1870

                        Fatal Accident.
                               ____
    A frightful accident occurred on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland, on Saturday morning last, resulting in the death of John Donnelly, a laborer employed in fencing the road. Donnelly, with others, started from this place early Saturday morning, on a hand-car, which they attached by a rope to the engine of the construction train, which was being backed up, one end of the rope being held by Donnelly, who was cautioned by his companions that he was in danger of being jerked off, but who appears disregarded their warnings.
    When about three miles from the village, a sudden lurch of the engine on a portion of the road not yet leveled, threw Donnelly off his balance, and precipitated him onto the track, in front of the hand-car, which ran over him. His companions picked him up insensible, placed him upon the hand-car and brought him back o the village, where an examination by Dr. Avery showed that his head and face were horribly cut, and his left leg nearly severed at the ankle joint.
    He lived but a few minutes after being brought to the village. He is said to have been a steady and industrious man, about thirty years of age, and single. He had two brothers employed in the same party, who were with him at the time of the accident.

DeRuyter New Era
Sept. 21, 1870

    The depots are rapidly approaching completion, and the slate roofs are being put on, which makes them present a fine appearance. Mr. Wright, under whose supervision the work is being done, is a thorough workman, and we shall long have cause to be grateful to him for giving us two fine buildings for our depots.
  The freight depot at this place is nearly finished. On Tuesday of this week there were shipped from this place, via the Midland railroad, about 14,000 pounds of butter, and on Wednesday about 80,000 pounds of cheese.

DeRuyter New Era
Oct. 14, 1870

    We had the pleasure, the present week, of meeting here in DeRuyter William H. Weed, esq., general ticket agent and superintendent  of the telegraph line of the Midland railroad. Mr. Weed is a thorough-going businessman and an accomplished gentleman. We hope to meet him often in DeRuyter.
     
Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Oct. 19, 1870

     Railroad Items.

    The DeRuyter New Era says: The work on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland is now being pushed with energy. The Wibert trestle is now finished.  The trestle is 75 feet in height and 400 feet in length. Over 15 tons of iron bolts and over 250,000 feet of lumber was used in its construction Mr.  Andas, the overseer, has done his work in the most thorough manner. The track is laid across the Otselic creek near to section 20, and an excursion train has been run to Norwich from that point. Ninety days will give us regular trains.
    The Midland is in actual construction as far westward as Truxton, leaving but ten miles of road up the beautiful valley from Cortland to Truxton to complete the connection with the Midland. Probably less than six months will elapse before the last ten miles up Truxton valley will be in process of grading, and before the first days of October of next year, the connection will undoubtedly be completed.
   The DeRuyter New Era says: " The work on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland is now being pushed with energy. The Wibert trestle is now finished. The trestle is 75 feet in height and 400 feet in length. Over 15 tons of iron bolts and over 250,000 feet of lumber was used in its construction. Mr. Andas, the overseer, has done his work in the most thorough manner. The track is laid across the Otselic creek nearly to section 20, and an excursion train has been run to Norwich from that point. Ninety days will give us regular trains."  
   The Ithaca Journal says: " Ten car loads of iron for the Ithaca and Cortland Railroad, are in Auburn and seven more are on their way from New York. The Midland is in actual construction as far westward as Truxton, leaving but ten miles of road up the beautiful valley from Cortland to Truxton to complete the connection with the Midland. Probably less than six months will elapse before the last ten miles up Truxton valley will be in process of grading,   and before the first days of of October of next year, the connection will undoubtedly be completed." 
(Note: Contracts, Norwich to DeRuyter, were let on June 4, 1869; and to Truxton, on July 29, 1870).

DeRuyter New Era
Thursday, Oct. 20, 1870

    DeRuyter Telegraph Line. - William H. Weed, Esq., and J.W. Merchant have the present week been soliciting subscriptions to enable the Railroad Company to construct a telegraph line at once from Norwich to DeRuyter. They also propose to run a wire to Georgetown and to South Otselic, giving to those villages  telegraphic communication with the rest of the world.
   The Midland company offer to pay 50 percent of the cost of constructing this line. They can for the present run the trains on the DeRuyter branch without the aid of the telegraph. We hope the people of this section, especially those who are interested in our cheese factories, will cordially aid this important enterprise.
    Mr. Weed informs us that if the requisite aid is promptly given he will have the line here in season to give us the election returns. No large subscriptions are asked for, only in such sum that every dairyman and businessman can readily contribute. This is not asked or expected as a donation, but either as subscription to the stock of the  company or the amount will be reimbursed in sending messages. 
      To our dairymen especially we commend this proposal, for an eighth of a cent addition on a sale of cheese would be an important item in their pocket. Every businessman of course, should help get the line in operation. We also learn that should sufficient inducement be offered, the line will be at once extended to Truxton.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Oct. 25, 1870

Correspondence 

Cuyler, Oct. 22, 1870

 Ed. Standard. Sir:  
- We notice in the columns of the Democrat, of the 24th inst.  
, headed "Here and There", the statement that three gentleman therein named, "went to Cuyler last Saturday night to harangue the radical electors of that  'benighted region'. The radicals of that town didn't seem to fancy the looks of the party, and refused them the use of the church, whereupon application was made to the proprietors of the Chenango cheese factory, who also refused them the use of their building, etc., etc." 
   The truth about the matter is this: A meeting was appointed and advertised by the Republican County Committee to be held at Cuyler Saturday evening, the 15th inst. , to be addressed by Republican speakers. 
    The construction of the DeRuyter branch of the Midland R.R.. through Cuyler to Truxton, brought to this 'benighted region' a gang of Irish laborers of Democratic and kindred proclivities from New York City and every other place apparently but the right one. At least they have proven themselves proficient in the Democratic science of repeating. 
    At the Republican caucus held in the town of Cuyler for the purpose of appointing  six delegates to to represent the town in the County Convention then soon to be held, they introduced the Tammany science of political strategy by first electing the right man chairman, then voting the ticket containing the names of their choice as delegates each four or five times a piece, and then extinguishing the lights in the room, ended by knocking the landlord down, and in the darkness and confusion which ensued, voting several handful of votes containing the names of their chosen delegates, and when the votes were counted and the result declared, Tammany's brilliant strategy had proved victorious over numbers, over right and over decency. 
    Republicans grumbled, but acquiesced. They have also shown that they excel in the art of rioting and mobbing so effectively taught and practiced by the Tammany professors. In fact, these rascals had so intimidated the inhabitants that, although the speakers were willing to risk their personal safety by addressing a public meeting consisting in part or entirely of the denizens of that 'benighted region', the trustees and  owners of public buildings were, or seemed at least, unwilling to hazard their property by throwing it open to the occupation of these exemplifiers of the beauties of Tammany Democracy. 
    In short, these men have gained the reputation, all along the line of this railroad wherever they have been, of being the very worst of their class. Many of them were engaged in election riots in Chenango county last fall, and, although none of them are legal voters, they have already proclaimed their intention of carrying out the Democratic doctrine of violating the ballot-box by stuffing it with their impure suffrages at the approaching election. 
    As to the cheese factory, not a word was said by any one about occupying it, and no request or refusal of the use of that building occurred. 
    Perhaps I should say that during this same Saturday night these constituents and supporters of Gov. Hoffman amused themselves and whiled away the small hours of the morning by smashing in the windows of the hotel at Cuyler. If there were any residents of this 'benighted region' who did not like the looks of the party who came to address them, it was some of these rum-sodden disciples of the Democrat.    

CUYLER 

Chenango Union
Wed., Oct. 26, 1870

    Severe Accident -  James Haggerty, a track-layer on the DeRuyter Branch, had his thigh broken on Friday morning of last week, under the following peculiar circumstances:  
    He was engaged at work on the Road in the town of Otselic, and at the time of the accident was walking on a high trestle, when he saw a platform car, used for carrying rails, coming rapidly towards him. Not being able to get off the trestle, he lay down on the ties between the rails, thinking that the car would pass over without hitting him. The brake, however, struck him near the hip, fracturing the thigh. He was at once brought to Norwich, and his injuries were attended to by Dr. Avery. 

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., Oct. 27, 1870

Railroad News 

    Wm. H. Gilbert, Esq., Chief Engineer of the Midland, was in town on Wednesday last. He is now organizing a corps of engineers to proceed at once to locate the road from Truxton to Auburn. The different routes should be to work a once, to secure the road through their locality. By July 1, 1871, the cars will run from DeRuyter to Auburn, we have no doubt, as the work is now closing up on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland. 
    We can but bear testimony to the promptness and gentlemanly dealings of the contractors, Messrs. Sage, Williams & Jerome. They have done all that lay in their power to promote the success of the Midland. The most thorough work has been accomplished under their direction. Their two assistants in DeRuyter, W. Gregory and H.D. Leonard, have cooperated with them in their successful endeavors to bring to a successful termination the contract for the road. 
    Fred W. Gilbert, engineer in charge of the Truxton subdivision, is a practical and competent engineer, who has won the good opinion of all. 
    Major Ten Brock, who has charge of the pile driving and trestle building on the railroad, informs us that the trestle work is now all completed to Crumb Hill. Trestle No. 2 and 3, DeRuyter, are finished; Trestle No. 1 will be done in one week, and No. 4 is nearly framed. 
    The dismal pounding of the pile driver is no longer heard in our village, but like the path of empire, it has taken its course westward, and is now down on the high bridge in Cuyler. 
    The foreman between DeRuyter and Truxton informs us that the grading will be done to Truxton, so that the track laying can proceed to that place as soon as the track layers reach DeRuyter. 
    The cars will be on Crumb Hill,  in the town of DeRuyter, next week sure. We learn by letter from William H. Weed, Esq., superintendent of Telegraph, that there is every reason to hope that South Otselic and Georgetown will do their part for a line. Now let DeRuyter give this one pull more and secure telegraph communications at once. 
    It will be seen by reference to our new columns, that Georgetown is already running freight by the DeRuyter branch. In a few days we shall bid Apulia and Chittenango good bye, and receive our goods at our own depot. 

Cortland Standard 
Tuesday, November 15, 1870

   Editor Standard : - A flying visit to Norwich, Chenango County, enabled us to make some observations pleasing to ourself, and we will furnish your readers with some jottings by the way. After a morning carriage ride of some four or five miles, we found ourself at the Otselic station, on the Norwich and DeRuyter branch of the Midland railroad, waiting the arrival of the construction train to convey us to the works on Crumb Hill, about four miles west of this point. The loud, shrill whistle soon notified us that we had not long to wait. On came the train, slowly making a curve across the valley, over the trestle fifty feet high, and halted at the station.
   Here we met Messrs. Sage and Williams, the gentlemanly contractors constructing the road, who invited us to their very best accommodations, which was a seat three feet high in the engine room. From this elevation we enjoyed an outlook upon the country while the train moved on over the unballasted track to the end of the rails at Crumb Hill. From this point to DeRuyter some three to four hundred men are now employed in excavating, building trestles, laying rails and ballasting the road. To one inexperienced in such business it is really marvelous to see the vast amount of work done on this line the past season.
   Our curiosity led us early to examine the steam shovel - a new excavating machine capable of doing the work of 150 men; moving about two cubic yards of earth per minute. This shovel consists of an iron scraper and box, about a yard square, attached to a derrick, and by means of cables and pulleys easily managed by one man. It is mounted on four car wheels and is readily moved on the iron rails. The company own the patent of this shovel and are having several manufactured to order -- themselves using to or three on their works. The machine carries its load from the bank and empties it in the cars.
   The rails are laid from Norwich to the summit of Crumb Hill, though the most of the road is yet unballasted. The summit is 1,000 feet above Norwich. It is thought that in 30 days the track will be laid to DeRuyter, unless there should be a failure in the supply of iron. Three construction trains are run over the road and although there are no accommodations for passengers, yet people will ride; so that many ladies and gentlemen are seen on every train. Considerable freight is being transported over the road.
   To expedite the work, trestles are built over the low valleys and deep ravines, all of which are to be filled with earth after the track shall be laid. These trestles are, many of them, very imposing structures of timbers; some of them 60 and 70 feet high. The material excavated for this road I observed was not the most easily worked. Rock, quicksand and hard-pan, which they were drilling and blasting with powder as if it were solid rock. 
    The old town of Norwich begins to wake to new life and show some thrift. It is said to contain about 5,000 inhabitants, though to look upon, I would not think it much larger than Cortland.
    The Midland company have erected here a large, two-story brick depot. It was quite noticeable that a large portion of the new houses were small,  cheap tenements. I saw only a few new, first-class residences. The town is not equal to Cortland in this respect. Like most old towns that start in rapid growth, many old, dilapidated and inferior buildings are yet seen on the main business street of the place, but the tooth of time and the tongue of fire will doubtless remove them after a while. Norwich is destined to become a large and flourishing business town and a desirable place of residence.
    No stranger can afford to visit Norwich without going to see the justly celebrated Lyon Brook Bridge, situated on the main line of the Midland, abut five miles south of Norwich on the road to Oxford. It is an iron trestle structure, 825 feet long and 165 feet high, costing about $75,000. The long iron trestles rest on piers of solid masonry, and are strongly braced by large round iron bars. It is made a station on the road, and it i said that the railroad fare of visitors has more than paid the interest on the cost of its construction.  I was told that such was the dizzy height of the work that ship carpenters had to be employed  in its erection. Two men have been killed and a young lady seriously hurt by falling from the bridge. 
    A narrow foot-walk is laid on each side of the track across the bridge, but many persons venture to cross it. One foolhardy, crazy-brained man took it into his head to immortalize his name by letting himself down under the track, clinging with his hands to the iron braces of the bridge, but he lost his hold and fell a mangled corpse.
    The Chenango Valley railroad, constructed by the Delaware and Lackawanna company is nearly completed. The first train over the line was expected at Norwich Thursday last. This road from Norwich forms a junction with the Syracuse and Binghamton at Chenango Forks.
DeRuyter New Era
Nov. 17, 1870
    The track is laid on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland as far as trestle No. 1 in this town. The men are hard at work on the trestle bridge and intend to be prepared for the track-layers when the reach here. The telegraph is up as far as Crumb Hill and rapidly approaching DeRuyter village.
Henry Tripp, who when we first circulated a subscription paper toward expenses of the Midland, gave the first dollar toward it, is also the first to receive a car load of freight at DeRuyter. Mr. Tripp receives this week a car load of flour and feed from Oswego via the DeRuyter branch of the Midland.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Nov. 18, 1870

    DeRuyter. - Thomas Wright has sold about 50 acres of wild land to the Midland Railroad Company. John Beach has, also, sold some wild land to the same company.
    At last DeRuyter has a railroad. The track is now laid through Crumb Hill. That supposed impassable barrier is now passed over by the iron rail. On Saturday, Nov. 12th, the track layers reached the town line of DeRuyter, and entered the town annexing us to the world.

Cazenovia Republican
Wed., Nov. 30, 1870

    DeRuyter - The track is laid on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland as far as trestle No. 1 in this town. 

DeRuyter New Era
Wed., Dec. 1, 1870

   The railroad track is laid across trestle No. 4. They are now putting in the fill on Utica street. We are to have a turn-table built here this fall.
    Herbert F. Wood, who has been employed on the trestle, from from trestle No. 7 on Saturday morning last. Mr. Wood slipped from the girder on the trestle and fell at least 20 feet. Though several injured, hopes are entertained that his injuries are not of a serious nature.

Cazenovia Republican
Wed., Dec. 7, 1870

    DeRuyter - The railroad track is laid across trestle No. 4. They are now putting in the fill on Utica street/ We are to have a turntable here this fall.
    Herbert F. Wood, who has been employed on the trestle. fell from trestle No. 7 on Saturday morning last. Mr. Wood slipped from the “girder” of the trestle and fell at least 20 feet. Though severely injured, hopes are entertained that his injuries are not of a serious nature

Chenango Union,
December 7, 1870

It is understood that an arrangement has been made between the Midland and the DL&WRR companies which gives the last named company the privilege of using the Midland depots and round-house. To do this, it will be necessary to lay extra tracks, as the Valley Road, south of this village, has the wide gauge; while north of this village, that road, as well as the Midland, use narrow gauge.Grading for another track, on the east side of the main track from the junction of the two roads to the depot, is going on, and it is said that it is to be run on the east side of the freight house for the accommodation of the freight trains on the Valley Road.
    The old town of Norwich begins to wake to new life and show some thrift.

Cortland Democrat
Friday, Dec. 9, 1870

DeRuyter Correspondence 
DeRuyter, Madison Co., Nov. 28  

Mr. Editor:  
    Week after week has passed by and still no news from DeRuyter. Believe me this is not owing to our having no news to give, but owing to our not having time communicate. 
    The railroad is progressing rapidly. The track is laid within three miles of the village, and already we can see the smoke arising from the engine designating the proximity of the "iron horse" to the village. The men are concentrated in the cuts immediately before the track, in order to make room for it; so that in two weeks we hope to see the fulfillment of the promise made by D.C. Littlejohn, of having the cars here by the 1st of January. 
   The telegraph poles are driven through the village and I am informed the Company have rented a part of  I.N. Smith’s dwelling house for a Telegraph Office. Thus you see we are no longer people out of the world, but a people holding an intercourse with the other world by means of telegraphic operation and railroad communication. 
You will not, I hope, think it inopportune to let our memory wander back to election and its results. You undoubtedly have seen that we had a great democratic gain in DeRuyter, over that of previous elections but you will be astonished when I tell you that it was not owing to the railroad men, as the R.R. authorities threatened any man who voted for John T. Hoffman with the (to them) awful doom of discharge from work. 
    So that I hope when republications (especially DeRuyter ones), charge the Democratic party with fraud in New York City, they will think of their own home fraud and then blush with shame of their own party. 
    Thanksgiving eve was celebrated by having a dance in the Town Hall, refreshments at the Taber House. Business is at  present  lively and active in the village, owing to most of the railroad men being boarded there now. 
    M.R. Merchant has returned from New York with a new supply of goods, James Bolger has renewed his stock of intoxicating fluids, and any person desirous of getting anything in that line will find it pure for medical and other purposes "down to Bolgers". John Frazer, formerly a foreman on the railroad, is now opening a billiard and lager beer saloon between J. McCulloch's grocery, and Jerome Neal's saloon. We have no doubt John will be successful in his new business.
 Feramory 

Cortland Democrat
Tuesday, Dec. 13, 1870

We learn that the track on the railroad between Norwich and DeRuyter will be completed the present week. The telegraph line between these points is in operation. The grading between DeRuyter and Truxton is nearly completed. --  Chenango Union 

Chenango Union
Wed., Dec. 14, 1870

    Off the Track -  The construction trains on the DeRuyter Branch were detained on their return to this village, on Saturday evening last, by a car on the forward train running off the track, a short distance west of Beaver Meadow. Contractor Williams, who was on the rear train - which is also used for carrying passengers and freight - called upon the hands on the trains to assist in placing the car again on the track, when to his surprise, he found that a dozen or more of his men missing. 
    After repeated inquiries, he learned that they had "skedaddled" for Beaver Meadow, where there was a platform car standing on the switch; this they proposed to place upon the main track, and, taking advantage of the down grade, ride into Norwich, without waiting for their friends upon the delayed trains. 
    And this they did, arriving in town about ten o'clock in the evening; but the grade through the village was not so favorable for their pleasure trip, and they were compelled to "hoof it", pushing their car before them, over the long trestle, to a place of safety from a collision with the downward trains. 
    A couple of hours were passed in this pleasing recreation - a good price for their free ride. About five o'clock on Sunday morning, the shrill whistles from the engines announced the arrival of the belated trains, startling out citizens from their Sunday morning naps, with the idea that it was a fire alarm; but it was substantially explained by Contractor Williams, who upon being interviewed upon the subject, jokingly replied that, as the other roads had recently changed their time-tables, the Branch was not to be outdone: this was the morning train from DeRuyter. 

Chenango Union
Dec. 14, 1870

    Two routes for the Midland railroad have now been surveyed from Tully to the village of Skaneateles - one through the towns of Spafford and Skaneateles, and the other through the towns of Otisco, Marcellus and Skaneateles.
    The Spafford route, as surveyed by Randall, makes the distance from Tully to the bridge over the outlet at Skaneateles, 22 miles and 316 rods. The other, or Otisco route, as surveyed by Doan, makes the distance between the given points twenty-four miles and 222 rods.
    On the first named, the grades are less than 19 feet to the mile; there is hardly a curve in the route, and not one to exceed two degrees. The latter besides being longer, must be built upon a grade ranging from 30 to 65 feet to the mile; seven miles in succession having a grade of 65 feet to the mile, with numerous curves of over four degrees. Each route has its champions.

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., Dec. 15, 1870
   
    The Railroad track is now laid across trestle No. 7 in Quaker Basin. In our next issue we shall announce the fact that DeRuyter and Norwich will be united by the iron rail. Work has commenced on the Depot grounds. We understand that regular trains will be put on in a few days.
    The Steam Saw-Mill has closed operations for the season. Said Mill has sawed for the Midland Company over five million feet of lumber the present season.
    About fifty loads of cheese were shipped on the Midland this week from Quaker Basin. This cheese was from Truxton.
    Our telegraph line is in regular operation and is already doing considerable business.
    The trestle on Section 29 near DeRuyter Cheese Factory is finished.

DeRuyter New Era
Dec. 25, 1870

DeRuyter a Railroad Town 
     On Tuesday, Dec. 20, the track layers reached the village, and laid the track as far as the end of section 29, to Tioughnioga street. For the past week, great activity has been shown by all our railroad men. Contractor Williams has been present, attending personally to the work. On Saturday last about one hundred men were employed on the L.H. Howes farm; but did not succeed until reaching the village that night. 
   The Midland Company employed a large number of hands completing the track. On Tuesday night, Engine No. 14, Frank Fisher, engineer, Charles Millington, Fireman, came in as far as Utica street crossing, and for the first time the shrieking of the locomotive was sounded in our village. For six years we have been striving to get a railroad to this place, and we can but rejoice that it is at last accomplished. All honor to those who have labored for it. 

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., January 4, 1871

    Otselic - The gravel trains have been idle for several days past. They have ballasted in places as far as Section 21. Some miscreants recently placed an iron rail across the track upon our long trestle, but it was fortunately seen by the engineer in time to stop the train.  
    Some of our citizens recently witnessed a novel race across our long trestle. A young man from South Otselic was crossing it, and when near the middle a gravel train made its appearance at one end. Upon perceiving our unlucky footman the iron-horse gave one prolonged snort, and, to his afrightened senses seemed to increase instead of slackening its speed as if anxious for a race. For a moment he gazed upon the approaching monster, and, perceiving no signs of mercy upon its iron front, concluded that he must  do or die . And he  did; for by a series of leaps which would have been creditable under more favorable circumstances, he gained the end of the trestle and sprang from the track just in time to escape injury. -   Cor. DeRuyter New Era.  

("...said company shall not allow any Irish shanties to be erected on said released land. ..."   From property deed transfer, James W. James & Wife, town of Cuyler, Cortland County, N.Y. to New York & Oswego Midland Railroad Company, Deed Book 51 P. 325, Dated April 1, 1871).   

Cortland Democrat
Friday, January 6, 1871
                               The Buffalo Midland Main Line
    The Auburn News prints the following from Col. Littlejohn, about the Midland main line t Buffalo, via Auburn:
Office of the New York & Oswego Midland Railway Co.
25 Nassau Street, New York
Dec. 22, 1870

    Editor, News: Dear Sir - Your favor of the 17th inst. is at hand. I have time only to say in reply, that no promises have been made to any persons in relation to what route the Midland Railroad will adopt between Truxton and Auburn. Surveys have been or will be made. When they are completed, the directors will adopt that which presents the most  advantages, taking into consideration distance, grades, business and means for construction. The Company must rely upon liberal local subscriptions on the line adopted for grading, masonry and bridging.
    The means raised upon that portion of our road already finished, both in personal and town, city and village subscriptions have been upon a most liberal scale, and I am assured they will be equally liberal between Truxton and Auburn. I have been gratified to learn of the interest manifested toward the proposed extension of our road from Truxton, and can assure you that if the means are furnished, the work at the proper time will be vigorously prosecuted.
                                                     Very truly yours,
                                                              D.C. Littlejohn
President, N.Y. & O. Midland R.R. Co.
    
Syracuse Journal
Friday, January 13, 1871

   The DeRuyter branch of the Midland has gone into winter quarters. Owing to the haste with which the last few miles into DeRuyter was ironed, and the lateness of the season, it was thought best not attempt running trains till spring, by which time it is expected that the road will be continued ready for the rails as far as Truxton.
   On Thursday afternoon a land-slide took place on Crumb Hill, at DeRuyter, opposite the steam-shovel. Over one thousand yards of earth cave in, damaging the steam shovel to quite an extent, but , but fortunately no one was injured.

Chenango Telegraph
January 25, 1871

        The Midland To Buffalo
                   ____
    In reply to inquiries from Auburn, Hon. D.C. Littlejohn wrote the following letter. It will be seen that Mr. Shepardson has introduced a bill in the Assembly designed to facilitate the object alluded to:
    Dear sir - Your favor of the 17th inst., is at hand. I have time only to say in reply, that no promises have been made to any person in relation to what route the Midland Railroad will adopt between Truxton and Auburn. Surveys of all routes supposed to be feasible have been or will be made. When they are completed, the directors will adopt that which presents the most advantages, taking into consideration distance, grades, business, and means for construction. The company must rely on liberal local subscriptions on the line adopted for grading, masonry, and bridging.
    The means raised upon that portion of our road already finished, both in personal, and town, city, and village subscriptions have been upon a most liberal scale, and I am assured they will be equally liberal between Truxton and Auburn. I have been gratified to learn of the interest manifested toward the proposed extension of our road from Truxton, and can assure you that if the means are furnished, the work at the proper time will be vigorously prosecuted.
                                             Very truly yours,
                                               D.C. Littlejohn
                            Prest. N.Y. & O. Midland R.R. Co.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Feb. 24, 1871

    J.H. Coy, and his gang of men on Section 31 of the Midland Railroad, were discharged last week. Only one gang of men are now employed on the road in the town of Cuyler. Nearly all the grading is done in that town.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, March 15, 1871

    J.A. Croley, operator in the Midland telegraph office, leaves DeRuyter this week. He has made a good many friends while with us. Dell has worked hard to build up a telegraph business here, and has succeeded. R.G. Lewis has now a gang of men at work on the Midland.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, April 7, 1871

    There is a gang of men at work in the village, another up by Mrs. Hollenbeck’s, another on Crumb Hill, and one down on Section 19. H.D. Leonard is again walking boss on the road; he goes down as far as Beaver Meadow. About ten feet of earth is on he track in the deep cut on section 10. This will be speedily removed with the force now at work at that point. 

Oswego Palladium
Wed., April 12, 1871

    Locomotive Signal Head Light - A Valuable Invention - W. G. Gilbert, son of the Engineer-in-Chief of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad, and Thomas J. Wheaton, Engineer of the same road, residents of Oswego, have invented a very valuable improvement and taken out a patent thereon. It is a locomotive signal head-light, simple in its construction and in its practical application. 
    It consists of a series of glasses of different colors - white, red, green, etc. - which can be thrown into position so as to cast any shade to the front, in the "twinkling of an eye", by a simple lever attachment which rests at the hand of the engineer. The combination of colored glasses can be readily attached to any of the present head-lights, and requiring no other change to place the improvement in immediate use. 
    In company with several persons last evening we were permitted to witness the operation of the invention. The light was placed at a remote end of a long room, showing a white light. At the signal of a whistle from the other extreme of the room a red light was instanly shown. At another signal a half red and half white light was presented. Then green, blue, etc. 
    The utility and value of this invention will be readily appreciated by all who are conversant with railroad operations and signals a white light or flag is the signal of safety, and red of danger. But these signals must be placed in the hands of a man who must run forward to show them, and then their power is so feeble that they can be seen only a short distance. This improvement has all the power of the locomotive head-light, can be seen a distance of miles, and can be shown by the engineer instantly without moving from his place. 
    With the catastrophe at New Hamburg Bridge, for instance, might have been averted by showing the oil train danger signal to the approaching train a mile or two off. The owners of this valuable improvement are the inventors, above named, and John H. Oliphant, of this city, and it will immediately be brought to the attention of the railroad men of this country. 

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, April 28, 1871

    It is expected than an engine will get to DeRuyter next week. The track is nearly clear, except on Section 19. We are now expecting a railroad from Cazenovia to DeRuyter. It is to be hoped that no such obstacle as was in the way of the Midland, will onstruct this road. It will be remembered that the engineers on the Midland ran against an apple tree, on Crumb Hill, and then threw down their instruments in disgust, and abandoned the line. The ghost of such apple tree still keeps guard on Crumb Hill, and has so far prevented the passage of trains.
    Zebulon C. Randall has been appointed railroad commissioner of the town of Cuyler, in place of Charles W. Brown, removed. DeWitt Croft has been appointed railroad commissioner of the town of Lincklaen.

Cortland Standard
Tuesday, May 9, 1871

    The first train on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland Railroad entered DeRuyter at about eight o'clock on the evening of the first instant. It brought the Board of Directors, the Superintendent, and Chief Engineer of the road, and the visit was for the purpose of locating the station-house and to decide upon a time-table for trains running between Norwich and DeRuyter.

Chenango Union 
Wed., May 10, 1871

The Auburn Branch -   The DeRuyter New Era of last week, has the following in relation to the early opening of the Auburn Branch to DeRuyter:  
    "According to our expectation the cars came into town on Monday afternoon and were welcomed by a large concourse of our citizens. Mr. Littlejohn, the President of the Midland, and most of the other officers and directors of the road were present, and were heartily welcomed by our people. They stopped overnight with our friend Taber of the Taber House, and in the morning located the site for our depot on the west side of Tioughnioga Street. The buildings are to be much better than were at first promised, and are to cost at least $6,000.00, as the officers of the road thought DeRuyter deserving of some extras for the financial and moral aid she had given to the Midland.  
    "The passenger depot is located on the south side of the track and the freight depot on the north side. The Company will put three work trains on the DeRuyter branch and the ballasting and finishing of the road will be pushed to completion as fast as possible, and we are promised regular trains in forty days. All hail to the Midland and its gentlemanly and efficient officers." 

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, May 12, 1871

    DeRuyter. - The railroad depot will be on the west side of Tioghnioga street. It was formally located last week. There will be two buildings, one on each side of the track. The cost will of them all be $6,000. This is in accordance with the agreement when the village was bonded two years ago. The village pays $3,000, and the railroad company the like sum.
    Ever since it was determined to build the road her, there has ben an agreement on the part of the company, and we cannot learn that they have changed  they minds, at all. The telegraph office has been moved again, to J.J. Delamater’s store, on Albany street. 
    The railroad company are rapidly fencing the road. On Tuesday of last week, on the return train to Norwich, a large number of our citizens took a ride on the platform car, some going as far as Crumb Hill. The trestles are as firm as could be asked for, not the least jar was perceptible in crossing any of them. A gravel train is expected to take its headquarters in DeRuyter.


Cazenovia Republican
Tuesday, May 17, 1871

    DeRuyter -  Hon. D. C. Littlejohn, president of the Midland Railroad, Judge Low, Chief Engineer Gilbert, Engineer Rock, Walter M. Conkey Esq., treasurer and other officials of the company, together with Mr. Williams of the firm Sage, Williams and Jerome, contractors, arrived here Thursday, on the 10:40 train from Norwich, and met Hon. J. W. Merchant and Hon. William Foster, two other directors of the road, and proceeded thence to Truxton, Cortland and Homer. It is understood to be the intention now to locate the road, finally, from Truxton, westward at once; and to prosecute the work with all possible diligence to Auburn, or to whatever object point shall be determined on. Construction trains are moving on divers sections between DeRuyter and Norwich, ballasting and perfecting the track. The prospects of the Midland are looking bright, and give promise of rapid progress to its early completion.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, May 15, 1871

    On Monday evening, about 8 o’clock the engine Otsego, No. 6, came into town, having on board, Hon. D.C. Littlejohn, Hon. J.W. Merchant; William Foster, Esq. and John A. Randall, Esqr., of the Midland Board of Directors; Chief Engineer Gilbert and Superintendent McKinley were also in the party. Our citizens turned out en masse to greet them. We lear from President Littlejohn that regular trains will be put on soon.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, May 19, 1871

    DeRuyter. - We are having quite a railroad fever in town. On Thursday of last week, a train of platform cars came up from Norwich bringing Hon. D.C. Littlejohn, Hon. Henry R. Low, Wm. Foster and W.M. Conkey, Esq., and Chief Engineer Gilbert and Division Engineer William Rock. The same afternoon the party being joined by Hon. J.W. Merchant, proceeded to Homer to examine matters in reference to the extension of the Midland west from Truxton.
    We learn that the party has all visited Cortland, and both Cortland and Homer are eager to avail themselves of the advantages of the Midland. On the same day, Thursday, some of our citizens went to Cazenovia where they had an interview with the Hon. Horace F. Clark and Augustus Schell, of New York, in reference to extending the Canastota road to DeRuyter. This extension we learn will shortly be done from DeRuyter, via the Midland to Truxton, thence to Cortland, thee to connect with the road to Ithaca and Elmira.
    On Saturday the first freight was shipped from DeRuyter on the Midland, two platform cards were loaded with cheese, hops and dried apples. A construction train is now at work between DeRuyter and Crumb Hill. The train stays in the village overnight, doe we are retailed every morning by the train leaving, and every evening by the the cars arriving. A new steam shovel is being put up at Crumb Hill. On Thursday  morning of last week twelve cars heavily loaded with timber were drawn over Crumb Hill to DeRuyter.

Madison Observer, Morrisville
Wed., May 24, 1871

   DeRuyter - We are having quite a railroad fever in town. On Thursday of last week, a train of platform cars came up from Norwich bringing Hon. D. C. Littlejohn, Hon. Henry R. Low, Wm. Foster and V. M. Conkey, Esq., and Chief Engineer  Gilbert and Division Engineer Wm. Rock.
    The same afternoon the party being joined by Hon. J. W. Merchant, proceeded to Homer to examine matters in reference to the extension of the Midland west from Truxton. We learn what the party has also visited Cortland, and that both  Cortland and Homer are eager to avail themselves of the advantages of a connection with the Midland.    
   On the same day some of our citizens went to Cazenovia where they had an interview with the Hon. Horace F. Clark and Augustus Schell, of New York, in reference to extending the Canastota road to DeRuyter. This extension we learn  will shortly be done and from De Ruyter via the Midland to Truxton, thence to Cortland, will there connect with the road to Ithaca and Elmira.      
   On Saturday the first freight was shipped from De Ruyter village on the Midland, two platform cars were loaded with, cheese, hops and dried apples. A construction train is now at work between De Ruyter and Crumb Hill. The train stays in the village over night, so we are regaled every morning by the train leaving, and every  evening by the cars arriving. A new steam shovel is being put up on Crumb Hill. On Thursday of last week, twelve cars heavily loaded with timber were drawn over Crumb Hill to De Ruyter.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, June 9, 1871

    DeRuyter. - Trains are now bringing Crumb Hill down to be used in grading up the depot grounds. The story of the removal of the depot some rods farther west is not true. The depot will be where it was first located or at least so say the men who have the matter in charge. The story of the change of location of the Midland originated outside of anyone connected with the railroad, The company have no thought of changing the site. The track of the Midland will be laid as rapidly as possible to Truxton. Already the road is laid into the town of Cuyler, and Cortland county is joined by the iron bands to the Midland sisterhood of counties. 
    General William L. Burt, of Boston, was in town Saturday last looking the ground over of the proposed road from DeRuyter to Cazenovia. Gen. B. is President of the Ithaca and Cortland road.
He was accompanied by Hon. Milo Goodrich of Dryden.
    The Midland company have erected a water tank on the trestle over the Tioughnioga River. Wednesday, May 31st, the first train of passenger cars left DeRuyter. The train was composed of five passenger coaches and was not as well filled as it ought to have been, the rain keeping a good many away. Thomas Ashland was conductor, and George W. Blodgett, ticket agent, accompanied the train. 
    The stations between DeRuyter and Norwich, are, as named by the Midland company, Crumb Hill, Otselic, Beaver Meadow, Ireland’s Mills, Plymouth and Frinkville, at all of which accessions were made to to  the number of passengers. The train arrived in Norwich in due season. On Thursday the cars were literally jammed full of passengers. Some six hundred being aboard the train.
    On both days a large number visited Lyon Brook bridge; some of whom were ready to swallow big stories of the cost of he same, one man even got the cost up as hight as $750,000. The track between DeRuyter and Norwich is nearly all of the way in good order, and he cars ran very smoothly for a new road. On the whole the excursion passed off very pleasantly, and the Midland company are much to be praised for affording so cheap an excursion to our citizens. 
    On Saturday the track was extended west from the end of section 18 beyond the depot grounds.
On Monday, of last week, work was commenced  putting in a switch at the depot; the switch commences a few rods west of Mrs. Scott’s. On Monday J.H. Delameter received a car load of goods via the Midland. Mr. D. was the first to ship freight from DeRuyter and the first to receive it. George W. Blodgett is now acting a freight and ticket agent. George has the recommendation of all of our businessmen for his permanent appointment as station agent.
    Mr. Pepper, the contractor for building the trestles west of DeRuyter, has his timbers nearly framed and is now at work framing the piles. Track laying will continue west of DeRuyter as fast as possible.
    

Chenango Telegraph
June 10, 1871

DeRuyter - It seems to be a fixed fact that the Cazenovia and Canastota Railroad is to be extended at once to DeRuyter, thence via the Midland to Cortland and connection with the Ithaca and Cortland road. Gen. Wm. L. Burt, of Boston, has been in town examining the proposed route. The preliminary survey is finished ... The Midland is located to Cortland and will be under contract at once from Truxton ... Our citizens are getting up an old fashioned Fourth of July ... On Monday afternoon a lot of wood on Crumb Hill near the railroad track was burned up ... The Midland track is laid quite a distance into the town of Cuyler ... James Bulger has reopened his inn. He applied and was granted a license on the first Monday of June ... A car load of cheese was shipped over the Midland last week.  Carl Von Schmidt. 

DeRuyter New Era
June 15, 1871
   
    The railroad company has commenced putting in the turn table in this town. It is situated about twenty rods west of Mechanic street. They have also begun the ditch for the permanent water tank. The ditch begins at the turn table and extends south to to the spring on by A.N. Annas, and situated south west of the cemetery. The fall from the spring to the tank is about thirty-five feet.
    The railroad track is laid nearly to the road crossing at the DeRuyter cheese factory in the town of Cuyler.

Oneida Dispatch
June 16, 1871

   The Midland is doing considerable freighting business on the DeRuyter  branch.    
  
Chenango Telegraph
June 21, 1871

   DeRuyter - We can now get ready to dismiss Deacon Crandall to abandon the Norwich and DeRuyter stage line. June 1st, the last day of the excursion, was the day for the Deacon to make his last return trip free that week to Norwich, and though the cars were ready to go and carried for one dollar to Norwich and return, yet one solitary passenger preferred to take the steady old wagon, pay his two dollars and go to Norwich with Deacon Crandall. Is this an age of railroads? …The Midland Company are putting in a turntable. About 1,000 cords of wood was burned on Crumb Hill last week. - Carl Von Schmidt.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, July 1, 1871

    DeRuyter - We passed over a portion of the railroad line between DeRuyter and Norwich last week and found the road in the following condition:
    Section 16 is nearly graded, 17 is about one-half done, 18 is graded with the exception of the approaches to the trestle work. The trestle work is rapidly up, one third of it is now done, and it will be finished in three weeks.
    On section 19 is a deep cut, in fact the deepest one on the line. All the men that can be employed are at work here, and it will require at least two months’ hard work to complete the grading at this point. On section 20 the grading is three-fourths done, and the remainder can be completed in three weeks. 
    On section 21 there is a rock cutting which is nearly finished, and there is no reason why this section cannot be finished by Sept. 1st. On section 22 there is but very little done, but the work is surface work and consisting of plowing and scraping, and can easily be completed in three weeks.
    Section 23 is in that awful Crumb Hill. A heavy force is employed here and the steam shovel is also at work and we can readily see that at least three fifths of the work is accomplished, and certainly three months can finish the grading.
    Section 24 is well advanced, except the northern and southern ends; this section will require at least six weeks to complete. Section 25 also has some work to do. The piles are driven for the trestle across the Wibert gulf. Mr. Holmes’ barns are removed, and only the grading is necessary to be done to fill in the in the trestle work remains to be done.
    Section 26, the piles are being driven on Joseph Best’s land and the grading nearly completed. On section 27 considerable remains to be done across the farms of John Hust and Francis Burt, but not very heavy work. Section 18, which brings us to DeRuyter village, is also well advanced. The highway of LeRoy H. Howe’s Rider farm is nearly finished, and work will be commenced the present week on the Howe farm. Six weeks will easily complete the grading on this section.
    The masonry is nearly done on the entire line, and the steam sawmill averages 25,000 get of lumber a day. More hands are being daily put on the road, and more teams are being engaged. Within two weeks ground will be broken in the town of Cuyler, and we have no reason to doubt  the promise of President Littlejohn that the cars will be here before snow flies. 
    The question of locating the depot for DeRuyter has been engaging the attention of our people the past week. A majority of our business men now ask a change of location, and have the road pass just south of the Utica street bridge, through Water street, just north of DeRuyter Institute, cross Division street at the candle factory, and have the depot down near Tioughnioga street.
    This would bring the depot and all its business entirely within the bounds of the old village corporation, and would not trouble those persons who are opposed to the village being extended.  

DeRuyter New Era
July 6, 1871

    The timber is being framed, in this village, for the railroad bridge, over the Tioughnioga river, west of Cuyler. 

Chenango Union
Wed., July 12, 1871

    An excursion party from Georgetown and Otselic - some five hundred in all - came down the DeRuyter Branch on Thursday, and proceeded to Lyon Brook Bridge, there to pass the day in interviewing that immense structure, and enjoying a picnic. But we learn that they were not so fortunate as the part in the grove, as the storm which threatened here, burst upon the party at the Bridge in all its fury. As the cars which conveyed them to that point had gone on to the switch at the Oxford station, they were met without a chance for shelter; and a friend who happened in that vicinity at the time, informs us that he never saw a heavier fall of rain before, nor a more demoralized assortment of millinery and dress goods.   

DeRuyter New Era
July 20, 1871

Our townsman, H.D. Leonard, has taken the contract of grading the Midland R.R. between Truxton village and Cortland, and with his usual promptness is going to work immediately. We understand that the work is to be finished this fall in time for the laying of the iron; so we shall expect to have railroad communication with the latter place this year. 

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, July 21, 1871

    Regular gravel rains commenced run-on over the road on Monday. The trains run as far as the steam shovel on Crumb Hill. Passenger trains will not be put on for some days yet

Chenango Union
Wed., July 26, 1871

Opening Of The DeRuyter Branch Of The Midland  

 We are happy to be able to announce, as the public will be to hear, that the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland Railroad will be opened on Monday next, July 31st. This event has been delayed beyond the time expected, but it was thought best to thoroughly ballast the road and have it in complete order before regular trains commenced running.
   We understand that two trains will run each way daily - one of them probably freight and accommodation - one of which will arrive here in time for the morning train north, and the other in time to connect with the 1:45 p.m. train south. The last train to DeRuyter will probably leave after the arrival of the evening trains from Binghamton and Utica on the D.L.& W. Railroad.
   This opening will be hailed with especial pleasure by the people of Plymouth, Otselic and other towns through and near which the Branch passes. It brings them within an hour of Norwich, and gives quick transit to more distant places when they have occasion to go abroad.
   Preparations have for some time been in progress for the necessary additional rolling stock, and we learn that six or seven new locomotives, and additional freight and passenger cars will be brought out in time to meet this new demand. The official announcement of the running of trains will probably be made this week.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, July 28, 1871

    Regular trains on the DeRuyter branch are expected to commence running on Wednesday of this week. Several carloads of rails arrived on Monday for the Truxton extension. H. B. Leonard, of DeRuyter, has the contract for grading between Truxton and Cortland.

Chenango Telegraph
Tuesday, Aug. 1, 1871

DeRuyter Branch Opened  
     It was determined some days since to open the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland on Monday of this week, but it was found that such progress had been made that the delay was unnecessary, and it was opened on the 27th, the first train arriving at 8:15 a.m. The change was so sudden that only a limited notice could be given, but there were two coaches filled with passengers.  
    Two trains will run each way daily, as follows: Leave DeRuyter at 6:40 and 11:15 a.m., and arrive in Norwich at 8:25 a.m., and 1:15 p.m., leave Norwich at 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., and arrive at DeRuyter at 10:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.  
    The Stations on the Branch are South Plymouth (4 miles), Plymouth (8 miles), Ireland's Corners, Beaver Meadow, Otselic, Crumb Hill and DeRuyter. These stations are accessible to the people of Plymouth, the south-west part of Smyrna, Otselic, Georgetown, Pitcher, & c., and will considerably affect quite an amount of travel and trade.  
    Those who have been over the road say that the track is in excellent order, the work having been thoroughly completed. We congratulate all concerned, the officers of the road and the people who are so greatly accommodated by it, upon its opening for business. 

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Aug. 2, 1871

                DeRuyter Branch Opened.
                       ____
    It was determined some days since to open the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland on Monday of this week, but it was found that such progress had been made that the delay was unnecessary, and it was opened on the 27th, the first train arriving at 8:15 A.M. 
    The change was so sudden that only  limited notice could be given, but there were two coaches filled with passengers. Two trains will run each way daily, as follows:-
Leave DeRuyter at 6:40 and 11:15 A.M., and arrive in Norwich at 8:25 A.M. , and 1:15 P.M. Leave Norwich at 9”00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M., and arrive at DeRuyter at 10:45 A.M., and 6:00 P.M.
    The Stations on the Branch are South Plymouth (4 miles), Plymouth (8 miles), Ireland’s Corners, Beaver Meadow, Otselic, Crumb Hill and DeRuyter. These stations are accessible to the people of Plymouth, the south-west part of Smyrna,  Otselic, Geogetown, Pitcher, &c., and will considerably affect quite an amount of travel and trade.
    Those who have been over the road say that the track is in excellent order, the work having been very thoroughly completed. We congratulate the officers of the rad and the people who are so greatly accommodated by it, upon its opening for business.

Chenango Union
Wed., Aug. 2, 1871

DeRuyter Branch -   Regular trains commenced running on Thursday morning last, on which occasion a large number of ladies and gentlemen from DeRuyter and other stations, availed themselves of the opportunity to take a free ride to Norwich and back.  
Two trains each way run over the road daily - the Express leaving this place at 9 A.M., and the Accommodation at 4 P.M. The Express leaves DeRuyter at 6:40 A.M., and the Accommodation at 11:15 A.M.  
David Shattuck of this place, has the position of Conductor on the Branch, and John F. Hill, also of this place, is Baggage Master - two excellent appointments.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Aug. 8, 1871

    The question of locating the route of the Midland road from Cortland to Auburn has for some days been agitating the minds of the people of “the loveliest village.” It is assumed that the route from Hancock, Delaware county, is already located, and that that part of the road is to be built. 
    There are several proposed routes from Cortland to Auburn, each having its particular friends. The Auburnians favor the the Homer and Glen Haven project. Other influential gentlemen favor the Freeville route, through Tompkins county, and another class the Dresserville survey, through Cayuga county.
    Auburn is asked to give bonds to the amount of a quarter of a million dollars in aid of the road wherever constructed, and to that project there is strong opposition. The subject at best is “highly mixed,” and just how it will terminate is a problem that  large number of people are waiting to have solved. - Syracuse Journal.
    Auburn & Homer Midland R.R. Co. - A company to be know by this name was organized at the Court House in Auburn on Thursday last, with a capital stock of $1 million, the necessary prerequisites to organization having previously been subscribed, and 10 percent paid in on such subscription. It is proposed to run the road from Auburn through the towns of Owasco, Skaneateles, Niles, Sempronious, Scott and Homer to Cortland, there to intersect the Midland.
    The following gentlemen compose the Board of Directors:
    Auburn - W. G. Wise, H.G. Hopkins, J. Lewis Grant, Edward C. Selover, Charles N. Ross, John S. Fowler, Edward H. Avery.
    Owasco - Bowers H. Leonard.
    Niles - Eugene B. Rounds.
    Homer - Jacob H. Schermerhorn, William T. Hicok, Charles O.  Newton, Thomas D. Chollar.
    E.H. Avery was chosen President; J.H. Schermerhorn, Vice President; David P. Wallis, Secretary; CH. Merriman, Treasurer.

DeRuyter New Era
Thursday, Aug. 10, 1871

Accident on the DeRuyter Branch -  On Saturday, the 5th inst., the down train from DeRuyter to Norwich, when rounding a curve, ran over a hand car on the road, smashing it to splinters and staving up the cow-catcher some, without, however, throwing the train from the track. The car was being trundled by some half dozen men who were on it, and had barely time to escape by jumping for their lives. We wonder what business these hand-cars have on the track at the particular time when a train is known to be due? Too much care cannot be observed to prevent terrible accidents. 

Cortland Democrat
Friday, Aug. 18, 1871

    Last Wednesday morning, President Littlejohn and Vice President Low of the Midland, and Hon. Perrin H. McGraw, Hon. Horatio Ballard, James S. Squires, Chauncey Keator, W.S. Copeland and others representing the Utica, Chenango & Cortland R.R., and Hon Henry S. Randall and Horace P. Goodrich, Esq., of the Ithaca & Cortland R.R. met at this place and proceeded to select the location for  Union Depot for the use of all the above roads.
    The grounds selected are on the farm of W.R. Randall, nearly opposite the residence of Dr. F.O. Hyatt, South Main street. Mr. Littlejohn stated as one of the reasons he preferred that location to any other, that they had graded up the river, and had a straight line from New York and Hancock through to this place, and the west, and that he did not want to make any curves if it could possibly be avoided.
    The Truxton and Cortland branch of the Midland comes into the Union Depot on a curve, and this curve is to be used by the Ithaca and Cortland to run up to the track of the D.L.& W.R.R.
   

Oxford Times
Wednesday, Aug. 23, 1871

                           The DeRuyter Branch
                                       ____
     On Wednesday last we made our first trip over the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland Railroad. The road rides very smoothly for a new road, and passes through a rich farming section. The stations between Norwich and DeRuyter are six in number, Plymouth being the largest and nearest to the road. The branch is doing a large freight and passenger business, even beyond the expectations of the company. The road runs along nearly level until it reaches Beaver Meadow, here it ascends an easy grade to famous Crumb Hill, where is a long and deep cut, and also a station. From here the road descends for five miles to DeRuyter, passing through a rather wild region and over numerous high trestle work.
    At Beaver Meadow we passed the excursion train from DeRuyter, consisting of nine cars completely crowded with men, women and children.And here we learned of the shocking accident that happened to one of the excursion party as the train was leaving DeRuyter, and which put a gloomy  aspect on the whole party. It seems that the excursion party got aboard the train at the lower end of the village, and as there was such a heavy load and the grade so steep out of DeRuyter they did not intend to stop at the regular stopping place at the upper end    
of the village.
    As the train, which was going at full speed, reached this regular stopping place, which is on a trestle work; but filled in where the street crosses, a young German named Paul Weed attempted to get on. He grabbed the iron brace and guard at the front end of the car and was swung between the cars, losing his hold he fell directly under the wheels, and five cars and an engine at the rear of the train passed over him, crushing and mangling him in a horrible manner.  The train was stopped after going some distance, and his brother, a baker in the place, got off. The unfortunate young man killed was aged 20 years, of steady industrious habits, and had been a resident of that place but a few weeks. This sad affair cast a gloom over the community. At DeRuyter we saw the remains of the poor fellow, and they little resembled the form of a human being. We hope never to look on the like again.
    We arrived in DeRuyter behind time, being delayed by the excursion train, and had but short time to look around. We found DeRuyter a pleasant though rather ancient looking village, but with plenty of evidence of thrift and enterprise. Now that she has a Railroad, with another prospect, we expect to see her take the front rank in villages of Madison county. Her citizens are noted for their liberality and enterprise, and are entitled to great credit for their part in securing the Railroad. 
    We called on John R. Beden, Esq., editor of the New Era and found him pleasantly situation and doing a thriving business. He publishes a good paper and his efforts should be rewarded. May our next visit to DeRuyter be of longer duration, that we may become better acquainted.
    To Conductor Shattuck and Baggagemaster Hill we are under many obligations for their kindness in making the trip pleasant and agreeable. They are both gentlemen and are winning golden opinions from travelers on the Branch.

Chenango Union
Wed., Aug. 23, 1871

Horrible Accident at DeRuyter  

    The  (DeRuyter) New Era gives the following particulars of the tragic death of Paul Weed, by being run over by the cars, at DeRuyter, on Wednesday last:  
    "As the Sabbath School Excursion train of Wednesday morning was leaving DeRuyter for Norwich, Mr. Paul Weed of this place attempted to jump on the cars at the crossing on Utica Street, while the train was under full headway. He was thrown under the wheels, and six cars passed over him, killing him instantly. Both legs, and one arm were cut into fragments and mangled in the most shocking manner. Deceased had bought his ticket and secured his passage at the place of starting, then sold his seat before the train left, and afterwards endeavored, as before stated, to jump on the train, against the earnest warning of several bystanders, and the fireman, who strove to prevent the inconsiderate act.  
    "Mr. Weed was a young man nineteen years of age, a native of Germany, and had but recently taken up his residence in DeRuyter, where he was beginning to to be favorably known and respected.  
    "A.V. Bentley, esq., Justice of the Peace, acting as Coroner in the absence of the coroner, immediately caused a jury to be summoned and held an inquest thereupon, on the body of the deceased in due form of law, and all the proofs and allegations touching the manner of his death were placed before the jury, by the assistance of H.C. Miner, Esq., who aided in bringing out the testimony of the examination of Witnesses before the Inquisition.  
    "The verdict of the jury was very explicit and unanimous that the deceased, Paul Theodore Weed, came to his death by the cars of the excursion train from DeRuyter to Norwich, passing over him at the crossing at DeRuyter village, on the morning of the 15th of August, 1871, as the deceased attempted to jump on the train while in full motion, after being warned by the fireman on the train and by bystanders, not to attempt to get on. Also that no person connected with the railroad, or any other person or persons whatsoever were in any manner responsible therefore or to blame." 

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., Aug. 24, 1871

    On Friday of last week, as the team of Horace Scott, senior, of this place, driven by a lad before a wagon in which Mrs. Scott, Mrs. Wilcox, and Miss Scott were riding, passed the railroad cut on the Zenas Rider farm, towards the Basin, it was passed by the 10:45 train coming from Norwich. The horse took fright, and, overturned the wagon and threw the women into a fence by the roadside, smashing up the wagon badly and hurting the women considerably. Mrs. Scott was injured in the back, and Mrs. Wilcox had a wrist sprained. 
    We understand that H.D. Leonard commenced the work of grading on his contract between Truxton and Cortland this week Tuesday, and it is his intention to push forward the work as fast as possible. 
    Several car-loads of timber for our depots have arrived, and it begins to look as though we should have a depot in a short time. Push the work forward, gentlemen, as we are sadly in need of comfortable shelter for both travelers and freight. 
    Our railroad agent at this place, George W. Blodgett, shipped 21 tons of cheese from this station on Monday of this week. 

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Aug. 25, 1871

    DeRuyter. - Our Sabbath School excursion was accompanied with a horrible accident. The cars were crowded with passengers to excess, numbering 900. All the tickets had been sold and a large number of passengers were unable to procure tickets for the excursion.
    Paul Theodore Weed, a young German, aged 19, who had purchased his tick and taken his seat in the cars was offered fifty cents for his seat by sone one who had no ticket. He accepted the offer and got off the train. As the train started from the depot grounds, young Weed stationed himself at Utica street crossing, intending to jump on the train. 
    The bystanders all of them warned him against such a hazardous attempt, Michael Batey ordered young Weed to keep off but it was useless. He made the leap, fell under the wheel and six cars and the rear engine passed over him, mangling him in a horrible manner.
    A Coroner’s inquest was held the same day, he verdict of the jury was in accordance with the above face. Of course no blame could in any manner be attached to the Railroad company.
    

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., Aug. 31, 1871

    On Friday last the Steam Shovel at Crumb Hill loaded 105 large flats with gravel. This is the largest number ever loaded before in one day. Our depot buildings are in process of  construction, and the prospects are that we shall soon have a passenger and freight depot for the accommodation of this station. 
    A large amount of ties, lumber, etc., is passing this station almost daily for the road west of us. A large amount of freight is being transported over our branch of the Midland.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Sept. 1, 1871

    DeRuyter. - G. Wright, the contractor for the depot buildings, is actively at work and in a few weeks we shall have elegant and commodious depot buildings. The paymaster of the Midland visited DeRuyter last week, and made the laborers again glad.


Utica Weekly Herald
September 5, 1871

    Over The DeRuyter Branch of the Midland. - We recently made a short visit to the Chenango valley. We left Utica on the Clinton road, (which will soon be a branch of the Midland,) connected with the 12:35 A.M. down train of the latter road at Smith's Valley, and thence to Norwich. At four o'clock, a train left for DeRuyter, which place was reached about 5:30. The distance from Norwich is 20 or 25 miles. The road is in very fine condition for a new road, and is doing a good business, both passenger and freight.
    Two trains a day run over it, the morning one leaving Norwich about 9 o'clock. The trains are in charge of Conductor D. Shattuck, whose genial manners, while acting conscientiously and firmly for the interests of his employers, have already made him a favorite with everybody along the route.  Mr. Littlejohn displayed excellent judgment in putting Mr. Shattuck on this branch. He is evidently the right man in the right place.
    There are several heavy cuts along this road, and considerable trestle-work. But everything is done in a thorough manner, and he road is as safe as any in the country. The section through which it passes is well adapted to either butter or cheese-making, and grows most crops in abundance, with proper tillage. 
    The opening of of this section to a market will stimulate enterprise and lead to improvements in farming which will rapidly change its face and make it once of the most beautiful and productive in the State.  The surface is quite broken and rugged until we reach the valley of Tioughnioga, in which nestles the smart little village of DeRuyter, which already begins to feel the invigorating influence of the road.
    During our stay of half an hour, we met  Mr. Beden, the editor of the DeRuyter New Era, Mr. Merchant, one of the directors of the Midland, and several other leading gentlemen, whose names we do not recollect.  They all seem to realize the advantages just thrown open to them, and are prepared to make the most of their relations with the outside world. 
    They can now get the Utica Morning Herald about 5:30 P.M., on the day of publication, and hope that when the Clinton Road comes under control of the Midland company trains will be run so that they can get the Herald in the forenoon. It is understood that passenger trains will be run by the company, from Norwich by 9 A.M., or a little after, would prove a great accommodation in many ways.
    As an illustration of the business done by the DeRuyter branch, the freight agent at Beaver Meadow, Mr. J.W. Levisee, told us that on the 8th and 9th of August 1,200 boxes of cheese, besides butter and other freight, were shipped from Beaver Meadow and Otselic. The day we passed over the road, the D. Brown factory loaded 140 boxes of June cheese of Beaver Meadow, which had just been sold at 10c. This is a good price, showing that the cheese must have been a fine article. We did not try it, but it appeared firm and well made as we raised the covers of the boxes.
   At this place, by the way, there is a sharp controversy about the location of the depot building. There are two points, known as Upper Beaver Meadow and Lower Beaver Meadow. They are located about about three-quarters of a mile apart, there being a nearly straight between them. The people of the upper place have been a little the most active and subscribed money for a watering tank, already built, and a depot building.
     They have been promised a building, and the people of Lower Beaver Meadow have been promised a flag station, but their rivals say they will not pay their money if the flag station is established, which will draw off a good share of the passenger business, and so for the present the cars do not stop at the lower place. The people there are a good deal excited over it, and the excitement extends back into the country, as the roads nearly all converge at the lower place, making it the most convenient. This place also ships large quantities of wood and lumber.
    Owing to the rivalry awakened, large numbers take the cars below, at Ireland's Mils, and utterly refuse to go to Beaver Meadow, thus saving fifteen cents on their fare to Norwich, which, of course, the company loses. To a disinterested looker-on, the rivalry seems almost ludicrous, but is a serious thing with the Beaver Meadowites.  Mr. Littlejohn may conclude to settle the hash by putting the depot building half-way between the two places, which would be a fair compromise and probably restore harmony.
    The DeRuyter branch leaves the east side of Norwich village, which it crosses to the west on the north side and turns north-westerly up the valley of the Canasewacta creek. It runs through Frinkville, Plymouth, by Ireland's Mils and Beaver Meadow, then passes over the ridge into the Otselic valley, crossing the creek about half way between Otselic and South Otselic. There is a station at the crossing called Otselic station. The next is Crumb Hill, and the last is DeRuyter. In a short time, another station, about half way to Cortland, will be reached.
     The road at DeRuyter takes a short turn west, to go to Cortland village, a distance of 18 miles, and will then turn northward again to reach Auburn. When completed, this branch must prove  valuable auxiliary to the main line.
    During our stay, we managed to visit the celebrated Plymouth Cheese Factory, which has been run ever since it started, about 1865, by Miss Dolly Stanberg. The proprietors wisely decided to keep the same cheese-maker, year afar year, and pay her enough to make it worth her while to stay with them. The result has been uninterrupted success from the beginning. Few factories in the State have sold at as high figures as the Plymouth. All their July cheese this year is gone, and the last sale was made at 11 1/2 c. 
  There is nothing peculiar about the process of manufacture. The milk is set at about 84 degrees and the curd is scalded at  98 or 100 degrees. Rennet enough is used to begin coagulation in 10 to 15 minutes, and the cutting is done at the end of 30 or 40 minutes. The curd is cut quite fine, for the purpose of securing an even scald, which we think is a point worth observing.
    Everything is kept scrupulously clean, and patrons have to deliver their milk in good condition though tainted curds are not entirely avoided. These are soured more than the sweet milk curds. Before dipping, but after the whey was pretty well drawn down,w e saw five or six pails of cold water thrown over a curd in a vat to reduce the temperature and prevent packing in the sink.
    This is contrary to the judgment of most cheese-makers, but there is no denying that good results are secured at the Plymouth factory. We noticed, however, that the temperature, after the use of water, was  only down to 94 degrees. There is no grinding of curds but they are finely broken up and separated by hand before the salt is applied. The rennets used are not Bavarian, nor Irish, but those saved by patrons and the farmers of the surrounding country.
    They are stretched on stocks and well cured, smelling sweet and clean, and being free from the rank, pungent odor which we find in most of the imported rennets. They are not used until they are a year old. There was no cheese on the ranged really fit for market, but what we tried, though not as firm and close as some we have been seen, was clean-flavored and full of meat.



Cazenovia Republican
Wed., Sept. 6, 1871

   DeRuyter - On Friday last, the steam shovel at Crumb Hill loaded 105 large car flats with gravel. This is the largest number ever loaded in one day.
    Our depot buildings are in process of construction, and the prospects are that we shall soon have a passenger and freight depot for the accommodation of this station.
Oneida Dispatch
Friday,  Sept. 15, 1871

    DeRuyter. - Thursday, September 19th, there will be an excursion on the Midland to Oneida Community, at half fare. We hope that DeRuyter, Georgetown and Otselic will be well represented.
   The freight depot is up and enclosed. It is 25x40 feet, with a platform eight feet wide around it. The passenger depot will be 25x50 feet, exclusive of the platform.

Chenango Union
Wed., Sept. 20, 1871

    DeRuyter - On Tuesday of this week there was shipped from this place via the Midland Railroad, about 14,000 pounds of butter and on Wednesday about 89,000 pounds of cheese. This shows the business, and is an indication that money will soon be plenty with our farmers. - New Era.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Sept. 20, 1871

   Progress of the Midland -  We passed over the line of the Midland extension to Cortland the present week, and found the work of grading progressing vigorously. About three miles between Truxton and Cortland is already graded. Work is being done in several places along the line. 
   The grading party nearest Cortland is down in Mount Eatum. Here is the only difficult portion of the line, but we have no doubt that Mr. Leonard will be through this cut in sixty days. The company have put up their road signs in DeRuyter, on Utica street. The freight depot is all enclosed and will soon be completed. High bridge trestle in Cuyler, will be completed the present week, when track laying will be resumed. The pile-driver on its westward course is now below Truxton, still pounding away. 
New Post Office Established  
    A new post office has been established at Beaver Meadow, on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland Railroad, and Dr. Joseph Stanbro appointed postmaster. This will accommodate quite a large district lying in the towns of Plymouth and Otselic. Another office has been established at Crumb Hill, in the town of DeRuyter. The mails will be sent over the Branch for the first time today at a compensation of $1,420 per year, to be carried daily.  
   The DeRuyter New Era says: 
   "We have been officially informed that this branch of the Midland is more than paying expenses, and that the receipts from the business of the road will compare favorably with any part of the Midland for an equal distance."  
   Then the "branch" is a good investment of itself, to say nothing of the additional business it brings to the main line. 

Chenango Union
Wed., Sept. 21, 1871

Fatal Accident 
    A frightful accident occurred on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland, on Saturday morning last, resulting in the death of John Donnelly, a laborer employed in fencing the road. Donnelly, with others, started from this place early Saturday morning, on hand-car, which they attached by a rope to the engine of the construction train, which was being backed up, one end of the rope being held by Donnelly, who was cautioned by his companions that he was in danger of being jerked off, but who it appears disregarded their warnings. 
    When about three miles from the village, a sudden lurch of the engine on a portion of the road not yet leveled, threw Donnelly off his balance, and precipitated him on to the track, in front of the hand-car, which ran over him. His companions picked him up insensible, placed him upon the hand-car and brought him back to the village, where an examination by Dr. Avery showed that his head and face were horribly cut, and his left leg nearly severed at the ankle joint. 
    He lived but a few minutes after being brought to the village. He is said to have been a steady and industrious man, about thirty years of age, and single. He had two brothers employed in the same party, who were with him at the time of the accident. 
    Mr. H.D. Leonard, the contractor for the grading of the Midland between Truxton and Cortland, is at work in good earnest and has already over three miles of the grading nearly finished just below Truxton, and is at work with gangs of men in various places along the line. it now looks as if the grading would be finished in time to lay the iron to Cortland late this fall.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Sept. 22, 1871

   DeRuyter. - The farm of the passenger depot is now up. The work of grading between Truxton and Cortland is going ahead very fast. About three miles is already graded. This past week a large amount of butter has been shipped via the Midland.
Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Sept. 29, 1871

    DeRuyter. - The slate roofing of the freight depot is finished. The building will shortly be ready for occupancy. The passenger depot is enclosed and will soon be finished. Mr. Wright, the contractor, has done his work well. He has also contracts for building depot buildings at Beaver Meadow, Cuyler and Truxton. 
    The construction train met with an accident on last Thursday afternoon when backing down Crumb Hill and somehow the tender got off the track and the engine also ran off. The only person injured was Fred W. Rounds, the conductor of the construction train, who in jumping from the engine sprained his ankle. The engine being in such a position that trains could not pass, the evening train from Norwich stopped at Crumb Hill  and the passengers were conveyed to DeRuyter in wagons. The obstruction was removed and the train arrived in DeRuyter about 4 o’clock in the morning.
    Had this been a passenger train no more damage would have  occurred and we can safely say that thee is no road on which more care and attention than on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland.
    H.D. Leonard, the contractor on the Cortland extension is just pushing things right ahead.
    The Taber House is constantly crowded with guests. Our folks wonder where all the people come from, for many supposed the cars would come to DeRuyter empty, instead of being well filled as they are with passengers. Our mail bags now come by rail but as yet the bags are as empty of mail matter as the heads of the Tammany Ring are of honesty. 
    The Midland is economically managed. The company understand how to have one man do the work of three men, for instance. J.W. Levisee Esq., of Beaver Meadow, is not only station agent at that place, but he is also agent  at Frinkville, Plymouth, Otselic and Crumb Hill. Mr. L. performs his arduous duties to the satisfaction of all. The company emphatically have the right man in the right place. 

Auburn Bulletin
Friday, Oct. 13, 1871

                     Midland Railroad.
                              ___
                                                   Auburn, Oct. 11, 1871.  

Dr. S. Willard, Chairman of Midland Railroad Meeting:
   
At the meeting of the citizens of Auburn, held last evening at the Academy of Music, I was called upon for information in relation to the several lines surveyed between Truxton and Auburn, and Cortland and Auburn. Without recapitulating my repacks, I state that I gave my reasons (founded upon the surveys that had been made of he several lines), for recommending to the directors of the Midland road the route known as the Murdock line.
    The comparison between the several lines under discussion was confined to the Murdock line, and the Homer & Glen Haven line. The Murdock line was characterized by me as a line everywhere favorable, and easy to construct. Upon referring to the profile of the Murdock route from Auburn to Cortland, a distance of 46 miles, with one single exception, the heaviest grade found upon the line will be an embankment of not to exceed 20 feet in height, and no excavation exceeding a depth of 15 feet. Work of this magnitude occurs only at four points.
    At the Beardsley creek the line as located will require a fill of 55 feet in height, extreme length of 400 feet. The foregoing facts will show my reasons for representing the Murdock route a favorable line to build; a line that can be constructed in one year’s less time than the Homer & Glen Haven line.
                                 Homer & Glen Haven Route
    I have stated briefly the prominent points of the heaviest work found on the Murdock line. I will now make a similar statement of the most difficult and expensive points found on the Homer & Glen Have route, as appears by the profile made by the company known as the Auburn & Homer Midland Railroad Company. And I think the profile represents the features of the line, in as favorable a light as the country will possibly admit of.
    The prominent points that I wish to refer to are as follows: By their own survey, at station 227, crossing of the Brinkerhoff brook, an embankment of 65 feet high, extreme length 700 feet, will be required. At the following points or station, the following respective fills or embankments will be required:
    At station                                    Embankment.                                  Feet high
       737                                                      “                                                   43
       760                                                      “                                                   55
       770                                                      “                                                   50
       804                                                      “                                                   78
       813                                                      “                                                   50
       859                                             Three Mile Point                               100
       945                                                                                                           50
       978                                                                                                           42
       985                                                                                                           42
    1,128                                             Scott Gulf                                            80
    1,153                                                                                                           50
    1,162                                                                                                           42
    1,170                                                                                                           60

       And these several embankments vary from 200 feet to 1,000 feet long, while there are cuts 25 to 50 feet deep. Above are only the most prominent points as represented by the Auburn & Homer Midland R.R. Co. points that show formidable and very expensive work, work that will require at least a year long time to build than any work found upon the Murdock line.
    Finally, a very prominent and important fact to look at, is that the main summit on the Homer and Glen Haven route is about 205 feet higher than the main summit on the Murdock route, which is equivalent to an elevation and depression of 410 feet, taxing the working operations of the road for all time.  Owing to this difference in elevation and depression, the easy character of the work encountered. and the character of the country will contribute to the business of the road, I had no hesitation in recommending, as I have, to our company, the adoption of the longer, or Murdock line.
    Only by way of explanation for the information of those who take an interest in the matter of location, am I induced to offer the foregoing statement of facts.   
    W.B. Gilbert, Chief Engineer
          N.Y. &O. Midland Railroad.   
    By special request Mr. Gilbert, Engineer in chief of the Midland Railroad, furnished the foregoing statement for information of the public. The directors of the Midland Railroad propose to extend their trunk line through Auburn, and have expressed their decided preference to approach this city over the Murdock route.  A large number of taxpayers heartily concur in the unanimous judgment of the directors and engineers of that road, while others are for the Owasco route. Doubtless much of this diversity of choice is attributable to a lack of definite understanding of the particulars relating to the two routes, and if these were fully understood, thee would be more harmony of action.
    For the purpose of enabling the public to form deliberate and intelligent judgments, the Chairman of the Meeting requested Mr. Gilbert to furnish for public statement, without comment, of the relating to the two lines, Deliberate consideration of testimony is much more favorable to correct judgment, than that which is hastily formed under the ephemeral excitement of a mass convention, and there is a much greater sense of individual responsibility in the former instance than in the later. Actuated by these considerations, it is hoped and believed that the motive for requesting the statement of the Chief Engineer will be appreciated and approved.
                                                   S. Willard, Chairman.   

Chenango Union
Wed., Oct. 25, 1871

    Presentation   - David Shattuck, the popular Conductor on the Midland Branch between this place and DeRuyter, was recently presented with a beautiful Conductor's lantern, by some of the prominent citizens of DeRuyter. It was a testimonial well deserved, and shows that his efforts to do his duty are appreciated. Those who were instrumental in making the beautiful gift will long be remembered by him for their kindly act, not so much on account of it's intrinsic value, as for the sentiments of good will conveyed by its presentation. 

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Nov. 3, 1871
    
    DeRuyter - The grading of the Midland is now being done within two miles of Cortland village. Tom Murphy, who has the contract for laying ties and rails is making fas work. He hopes to be at Truxton village by Election Day.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Nov. 14, 1871
   
    Willett, Nov. 13th, 1871 - I suppose your readers would like to know what the prospective railroad has done for Willett. In the first place it has caused our landlord to picket a snug little some of money by the way of board bills; and in the second, it has caused considerable discussion as to the probability of its ever passing through here. 
    And, third, it has hurried the Doctor to finish his house lest we should see the smoke of the engine before that of his chimney. And now we would encourage him to hurry up for it is our wish to attend a good old fashioned house-warming in the new dwelling, such a one as he is capable of giving. 

Chenango Union
Wed., Nov. 15, 1871

DeRuyter -   "Mr. Chapin, formerly brakeman on the passenger train has been appointed Conductor on the Construction train. This is a good appointment, for "Doc" is a good fellow, and will make an excellent conductor.  
"A branch track has been laid to the Risley gravel bank, and the steam shovel is to be removed from Crumb Hill there, and the work of ballasting the road-bed between DeRuyter and Truxton commenced immediately.  
"The switch is being laid at Cuyler, and railroad matters progress finely in that direction. The first freight ever taken into Cuyler, on the cars, was received there this afternoon, and was for Mr. Fuller.  
"There are now two work trains on this branch of the Midland. The engine 'DeRuyter' having been placed on this line. H.D. Leonard, has taken the contract for doing the grading between Freeville and Auburn, on the Midland Railroad." -   DeRuyter New Era  

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, Dec. 2, 1871

    Austin McMahon died in DeRuyter, on Wednesday last, from injuries received while unloading iron at the depot, about three weeks ago. The Midland between Truxton and DeRuyter is lined with men, engaged in ballasting. The steam shovel is actively at work down on Schlellinger’s land.
    The gravel train is hard at work, and we see no reason but what the road will be open for business to Cortland by Jan. 1st, 1872. The Cuyler depot is raised, and work has commenced on the Truxton depot. A corps of engineers is now laying out work from Freeville.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Dec. 6, 1871

    Plymouth -  It is quite a treat, in this place heretofore rather lonesome and quiet, to hear the whistle of the steam engine and to be able to take a ride in the cars from one's own door. It makes the journey to Norwich more a pleasure then a toil. Our depot is going up and we shall be glad to have it in use.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Dec. 13, 1871

    Plymouth - Mr. W. D. Powell received the appointment and entered upon his duties as agent for N.Y.&O.M. R.R. Co., in this place on Dec. 2d ... Mr. Charley Beckman, in the employ of the N.Y.&O.M. R.R. Co., is at home recovering from a bruise on his shoulder, received in coupling cars near Lyon Brook Bridge. 
Midland Notes -   Having recently passed over the Auburn branch of the Midland we send you a few hasty notes of the progress on this portion of the road.  
    Frinkville is the old place, nothing new. At Stewart's, where a flag station was recently established, an effort is being made to procure means by subscription to build a depot. The prospect is that a sufficient amount will be subscribed to secure a station house.  
    Plymouth is soon to be accommodated with a depot. The station is now enclosed and will be completed in a short time. Munroe Brothers have shipped and have ready to send 500 barrels of eggs from this place the present season.  
    Lower Beaver Meadow has had some ten or a dozen houses built there the past summer. Dewitt Friedenburgh has also put up a saw ship where he is hard at work fixing saws. Beaver Meadow rejoices in a new and elegant depot building, nearly ready for occupancy. We congratulate J.W. Levisee, Esq., on so soon having comfortable quarters for business.  
    Mr. L. has worked hard for the railroad company since the opening of the road. He has been station and express agent for Crumb Hill, Otselic, Beaver Meadow, Plymouth and Frinkville. He has given the best satisfaction to the patrons of the road.  
    The foundation of the depot at Otselic is laid, and we learn that the depot building will be put up as soon as possible.  
    G. Wright, Esq., who built the Beaver Meadow depot, has the contract for this also. Chauncey Duncan has put up a stall at the trestle, and now keeps a good assortment of groceries, flour and other articles. It is a little singular that the post office department has not yet established a post office at Otselic station, one is very much needed at this point, especially   as South Otselic and other offices which are supplied from this, can get their mails so much quicker if the mail could be changed to here instead of having to go to North Otselic first as they do at present.  
    DeRuyter gains slowly, we notice one new street opened in the east part of the village and one in the west part also. The new freight and passenger depots add much to the appearance of DeRuyter.  
    All who travel on the DeRuyter branch speak in high terms of Mr. David Shattuck, Conductor. Mr. S. by his gentlemanly deportment, has made himself deservedly popular with all travelers on his train.  
    The construction of the Cortland extension is being pushed forward as rapidly as possible. The iron is laid below East Homer, about five miles from Cortland. The Depot at Cuyler is up and enclosed. The road from DeRuyter to Truxton is ballasted sufficient for the running of trains.  
    C.H. Chapin now has charge of the construction trains on this portion of the road.  Franklin  
                                   _____

(Agreement made March 1, 1872 for the DL&W to cross lands of the grantor (NY&OM) "DeRuyter Branch". This easement crossing was 316 feet north along the DL&W from the centerline of Mitchell Street crossing in Norwich- From DL&W Valuation Map section MP 233 - MP 234)
                                 _____
Cortland Standard
Tuesday, January 2, 1872

    Marcellus and Otisco Valley Railroad. - The friends of this enterprise held a meeting Saturday afternoon at Marietta. The meeting was well attended, and friends of the road were in attendance from Marcellus, Onondaga, Otisco, Spafford, Tully, and other towns along and near the proposed line. 
    Several resolutions were adopted to the effect that the road be built from Marcellus station, either to Preble or Homer on the Binghamton road, calling on the towns to bond in aid of the project, and appointing committees on subscriptions, &c. 
    There seems to be no doubt that the inhabitants of the Otisco Valley are bound to have a railroad. They tried hard to get the branch of the Midland, Spafford bonding for $100,000, and Otisco, we believe, for that amount.
    Such a road would not have benefited them as much as this one will, as Syracuse as their center, and the largest part of their business must necessarily be done here. This road will give them direct communication with the city.
    We understand that Marcellus is already moving to obtain the necessary consents to bonding, and that a bill will be presented at the opening of the session of the Legislature, authorizing the several towns to bond. The projectors of the road are in hopes of beginning the work as soon as the first of May at the latest, and of pushing it through as soon as possible. 
    The committee in charge are: D.G. Coon, O.J. Brown, and James Dewitt, of Marcellus; M.L. Gardner, of Onondaga, James Niles, of Otisco; and S. Stanton of Spafford. - Syracuse Standard.

Cortland Standard
January 2, 1872

    The New York Western Midland R.R. Co. - This company has recently been organized for the purpose of constructing a railroad from Hancock, in the county of Delaware, through Deposit, Ninevah, Cincinnatus, Cortland, Homer, Skaneateles and Weedsport to connect with the Lake Ontario Shore R.R. at or near Sodus Bay. Arrangements have already been made with the last named company for this important connection, thus forming with the Lake Shore and the Midland a short trunk road from New York to Lake Erie and the west.
    The surveys are made and the paper containing the names of the incorporators are already filed in the office of the Secretary of State at Albany. Individual subscriptions have already been subscribed to the amount of $165,000, and the work of bonding the towns along the route is to commence forth with. The first meeting for this purpose is to be held at Deposit, on Wednesday, January 3, 1872.  Hon. D.C. Littlejohn,  Hon. Henry R. Low and others will address the meetings. The Board of directors is composed of the following gentlemen:
    George Opdyke, Hezekiah Watkins and Spencer D. Schuyler of New York; D.C. Littlejohn of Oswego, Henry R. Low of Middletown, P.H. McGraw of McGrawville, Oliver Glover of Homer, J.W. Merchant of DeRuyter, Eben Bean, Charles Pardee and Joel Thayer of Skaneateles, William J. Cornwell of Weedsport and William L. Ford of Deposit.
    The proposed line runs through a section of the State that is thickly populated, rich in agricultural resources, and has connections to the great west through Canada by the Great Western Railroad. Its passenger and freight traffic will be large in consequence, for it will save time and distance - and distance and time in this fast age are money.

New Era, DeRuyter
Wed., January 10, 1872

    The arrangements are all being made for the extension of the Cazenovia and Canastota Railroad to DeRuyter the coming spring. On Monday, many gentlemen interested in the enterprise were at this place, on business connected with the building of the road.
    We understand that h iron is down on the Midland to the Tioughnioga River, within the corporation of Cortland village, and we may soon expect to be able to take the cars at this place and ride by rail direct to Cortland via the Midland. It is expected that the Road will be completed to Cortland before the 25th of this month, and we hear that there will be an excursion on that day, and a free dinner given by the citizens of Cortland.
    The ticket office and telegraph office have been removed to the Passenger Depot building and have very nice quarters. The telegraph line is completed to Cortland and messages can be sent direct from this place to that point.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., January 10, 1872

    Collision -   On Thursday afternoon last, the locomotive 'DeRuyter', on the train from DeRuyter, collided with the switch engine 'Clinton', at the junction in this village - the latter being upon the main track attempting to get out of the way of the former, which was coming down the sharp grade of the Branch. Both engines were considerably damaged, the 'DeRuyter' so much so that it had to be laid up for repairs.  
    The 'Clinton' still does duty upon the track, minus a cow-catcher and some ornamental work in front. No one on the train was injured, although there was some lively jumping on the part of the employees. A seat in the coach, occupied one passenger, was reversed, causing the astonished traveler to turn a somersault, and "go for" the woodbox, head foremost. Picking himself up, he came to the conclusion that the train had "stopped at Norwich fifteen minutes for refreshments". 

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., January 11, 1872

    DeRuyter -  The arrangements are all being made this winter for the extension of the Canastota and Cazenovia Railroad to DeRuyter the coming spring. On Monday, many gentlemen interested in the enterprise were at this place, on business connected with the building of the road. 
   We understand that the iron is down on the Midland to the Tioughnioga River, within the corporation of Cortland village, and we may soon expect to be able to take the cars at this place and ride by rail direct to Cortland via the Midland. It is expected that the Road will be completed to Cortland before the 25th of this month, and we hear that there will be an excursion on that day, and a free dinner given by the citizens of Cortland. 
   The ticket and telegraph office have been removed to the Passenger Depot building and have very nice quarters. The telegraph line is completed to Cortland and messages can be sent direct from this place to that point.

Chenango Union
Wed., January 11, 1872

    DeRuyter -  The arrangements are all being made this winter for the extension of the Canastota and Cazenovia Railroad to DeRuyter the coming spring. On Monday many gentlemen interested in the enterprise were at this place, on business connected with the building of the road. We understand that the iron is down on the Midland to the Tioughnioga River, within the corporation of Cortland village, and we may soon expect to be able to take the cars at this place and a ride by rail direct to Cortland via the Midland. It is expected that the Road will be completed to Cortland before the 25th of this month, and we hear that there will be an excursion on that day, and a free dinner given by the citizens of Cortland. The ticket office and telegraph office have been removed to the Passenger Depot building and have very nice quarters. The telegraph line is completed to Cortland and messages can be sent direct from this place to that point.




                           Old time brass baggage check for Otselic Center


New Era, DeRuyter
Wed., January 10, 1872

    The arrangements are all being made for the extension of the Cazenovia and Canastota Railroad to DeRuyter the coming spring. On Monday, many gentlemen interested in the enterprise were at this place, on business connected with the building of the road.
    We understand that h iron is down on the Midland to the Tioughnioga River, within the corporation of Cortland village, and we may soon expect to be able to take the cars at this place and ride by rail direct to Cortland via the Midland. It is expected that the Road will be completed to Cortland before the 25th of this month, and we hear that there will be an excursion on that day, and a free dinner given by the citizens of Cortland.
   The ticket office and telegraph office have been removed to the Passenger Depot building and have very nice quarters. The telegraph line is completed to Cortland and messages can be sent direct from this place to that point.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, January 12, 1872

    DeRuyter. - The telegraph office is moved to the depot, and the passenger trains now start from the same point.
    Some one has been getting up an account of the “boiler-heads” of the engines being smashed, at the collision in Cuyler a short time ago. It was not the boiler-heads only, the spanker boom got twisted. We must say that seldom has so few accidents happened on a new road, as there has on the Cortland extension.

Cortland Standard
Tues., January 16, 1872

    The Auburn Advertiser of the 5th inst., says: A dispatch from one of the Directors of the Midland Railroad, dated at Norwich, yesterday, states that the bills of timber and stone for the Murdock line have just been completed, and contracts made for timber for the most important bridge between Freeville and Murdock’s, located in the town of Lansing. 
    The dispatch further states that the work on the Murdock line is being pushed vigorously. The same energy that has been witnessed all along the line of the Midland in pushing it to a completion, is to be brought to bear in completing it over the Murdock line.
    The Auburn R.R. War. - About one hundred residents of the towns of Genoa, Venice and Scipio, Cayuga county, have published an address to the citizens of Auburn about the location of the Buffalo line of the Midland R.R.  These towns are on the “Murdock Line,” which is preferred by Mr. Littlejohn, and they have gone on and bonded virtually under assurances that Auburn would bond for any line the Midland management have heretofore encouraged them to bond, declare that Auburn will not consent to bond for the Murdock line.
    They say that the Midland managers have adopted their line and have made certain pledges, which they are proceeding in good faith to fulfill, and they intend to build - are today building - a railroad, as part of the Midland, extending from New York City westward, and intended to reach the Niagara River, and that the only question for the taxpayers of Auburn to decide is, if they will aid by the sum of $250,000 to bring the Midland to Auburn, or will they force that line from Scipio Summit to Cayuga Bridge. They also intimate that it will not be well for Auburn to turn them off and force their local trade to some other point. 
_________

Skaneateles - History of its Earliest Settlement and Reminiscences of Later Times by Edmund Norman Leslie, New York, 1901, PP 274-277

The New York Western Midland Railroad. 

   The citizens of the town of Skaneateles are requested to meet at Legg Hall, at 2 o'clock  P.M., and at Gamble's Hall, Mottville, at 7 P.M., on Friday, March 8, 1872 to discuss our interests  in the building of The New York Western Midland Railroad, a line connecting with the New York and Oswego Midland Railroad, at or near Hancock, Delaware County, running thence northwest through the counties of Chenango, Broome, Cortland, Onondaga, Cayuga, and Wayne, connecting with the Lake Ontario Shore Railroad at or near Sodus Bay, forming the third trunk line from New York to the Great West through the State. Hon. D. C. Littlejohn, Hon. Perrin H. McGraw, and other members of the Board of Directors will be present and address the meeting. A full attendance is requested. 
    Meetings to discuss the same project will be held at Spafford Corners, on Thursday, at  2 P.M., and at Borodino, at 7 P.M. 
On the 18th of April, 1872, D. C. Littlejohn made a speech at Legg Hall to induce the people of the town of Skaneateles to bond the town for $250,000 in aid of this railroad. The scheme of the Board of Directors and the interested parties here in Skaneateles was as follows : 
" We propose to build this road from Weedsport, through Brutus, Elbridge,  Skaneateles, Spafford, along the east side of Skaneateles Lake, and through Scott and Homer, to Cortland, expecting at the latter place to receive coal from the Cortland and Ithaca Road, which can be shipped to Weedsport on the canal, and at Fair Haven on Lake Ontario. They also expect to have trackage from Weedsport to Fair Haven over the Southern Central, and thus connect with the Lake Shore Road, which was then being constructed. The distance  from Homer to Weedsport is thirty-three miles. These gentlemen are assured of $50,000 of voluntary subscriptions, $75,000 from Brutus, $125,000 from Elbridge, $200,000 from Skaneateles, besides five miles of road already constructed*, in all $340,000 ; also $100,000 from Spafford, and would like Homer to bond for $100,000. 
  “With such amounts they think there would be no mortgage on the road, and therefore the towns would own it permanently. On account of the difficulty beyond Glen Haven, their Skaneateles friend thinks the Auburn and Homer Road would cost at least one-third more than the one to Skaneateles and Weedsport. Also that. Auburn being so much larger than Homer, a road to Auburn would carry business away from Homer, instead of bringing business to it, whereas Skaneateles would not. The Skaneateles friend says : ' We intend to  build the road, when or how soon depends somewhat upon you and others. We are looking to you, and hope to realize from you. Your neglect, however, will not necessarily prevent the construction of the road.' Since the letter received from Skaneateles was written, a new organization has been perfected, which has Hancock on the south, and some place near Wolcott on the north, with its objective point on the south connecting with the Midland, and on the north with the Lake Ontario Shore Road, a distance of about one hundred miles." 
    Such was the plan of these gentlemen whose interest in and love for Skaneateles was to persuade the people of the town to bond for $250,000. After the bonding was complete, then these interested gentlemen would allow Skaneateles to look out for itself. Their interest would cease immediately. Hon. D. C. Littlejohn addressed the public meeting in such cunning manner, representing, among other matters, that shippers of produce would be immensely benefited by selling such produce directly to the consumers in New York, without the intervention of middlemen ; in fact, his flowery speech bewildered the audience in such manner that they were ready to bond immediately. The managers, anticipating this result, had previously prepared to receive the signatures to the petition. 
    Any town desiring to bond in aid of a railroad was obliged by law to procure the passage of an act of the Legislature permitting such town to bond and appoint commissioners, with other details. A bill, therefore, was drawn for the purpose and presented to the Legislature. While this bill was before the Legislature, there were many prominent citizens in the town opposed to the bill becoming a law, and were more particularly interested in protecting the town from assuming such an enormous indebtedness as $250,000, the annual interest on which would have been $12,000 or $15,000. Prominent among the opposition were William Marvin, H. L. Roosevelt, F. G. Weeks, C. W. Allis, and myself. As the promoters of this 
scheme to persuade the people of this town to bond for this road were more interested in their own profit than in the town, I endeavored to oppose the passage of this law through the Legislature by correspondence only, but, having no political " pull," it passed both the Senate and Assembly, and was before the Governor for his signature. I immediately addressed a protest to the Governor, and received the following communication from him : 
State of New York, Executive Chamber, 
Albany, February 16, 1872. 

Dear Sir: 
   The bill to enable the towns of Skaneateles and Spafford to bond for railroad purposes has passed the Legislature, and is before me for signature. 
   The Senator and the three members from that county strongly urge its approval. As the towns can not be bonded under it without the approval of a majority of the taxable property, I would like to hear from you further in relation to the subject, if you press your objections. You will please answer as soon as possible. 
Very respectfully, 
John T. Hoffman. 
E. Norman Leslie, Esq., Skaneateles. 
    The bill became a law, and the interested parties were very happy. Tip Crosier was thereupon appointed to receive the signatures of the taxpayers of both town and village. The statute not only required a majority of the taxpayers, 
but also a majority of the taxable property. While Tip Crosier was procuring the signatures, another meeting was held at Legg Hall for the purpose of appointing the three commissioners required by law who were to represent the interests of 
the town. That meeting appointed Julius Earll, Benoni Lee, and Sidney Smith. These persons did not please certain politicians, who did not like the idea of having two Democrats and only one Republican, so, when the bonding came to 
be proved before the County Judge, the political objectors influenced the Judge to name C. C. Wyckoff as commissioner in place of Benoni Lee. This political move, of course, was successful. 
    It was not long before great dissatisfaction began to be made known by many prominent citizens throughout the town, some of whom determined to make an examination into the legality of the proceedings. As I, from the commencement 
of the proceedings to bond this town for the large sum of $250,000, knew that the taxpayers had been deceived by the promoters of this grand railroad combination, my efforts were continued to defeat, if possible, this bonding of the town. Therefore I immediately obtained possession of the petition, which had been signed apparently by a majority of the taxpayers, and made a very critical examination of each name. On comparing them with the town assessment roll, a considerable number of the names were not found on the assessment roll, but not enough to defeat the bonding. 
    An examination of the town corporations which had signed the petition showed that two had not complied with the statute. Corporations can not be legally represented on a petition of this character by the mere signature of a president, who is merely the presiding officer. In order to legalize the official act of a corporation, there must have been a previous meeting of its board of trustees or directors, which by resolution, recorded on its minutes, authorized one of its designated officers to sign its corporate name to such a petition. 
   In the instance under consideration, no authority was given the president of the corporations to sign the corporate name. The fatal defect was that these corporations had been illegally represented on the petition, and therefore the taxable property represented by them was not sufficient to represent a majority of the taxable property of the town. Under the provisions of the Railroad Act, Chapter 907 of the Laws of 1869, to determine the legality of a petition to the County Judge, the following proceedings, copied from that law, are to be observed : 
    " It shall be lawful for the County Judge to proceed to take proof concerning the allegations of such petition ; and if it shall be proved to his satisfaction that all the consents, necessary to be obtained before such bonds could be lawfully 
issued, were so obtained, he shall find the facts and so adjudge and determine, and such judgment, and the record thereof, shall have the same force and effect as other judgments and records in other courts of record in this State." 
    Up to this time the County Judge had already taken proof concerning the allegations of the petition, which had been proved to his satisfaction, that all the consents had been obtained, and that the bonds could then be lawfully issued, and 
his judgment in respect thereto had been recorded. Thus far this grand scheme was a success. Up to the time that the County Judge had adjudged and determined that the consents necessary to be obtained were so obtained, the town of 
Skaneateles was actually bonded for $250,000, and the bonds were to be immediately issued, and, had it not been for my discovery of the illegal consent of the two corporations to the petition, this town of Skaneateles would now have a 
bonded debt of $250,000. At the time of this fatal defect, and of the defection of the County Judge, it was fortunate for the town that the limited time for an appeal to the General Term of the Supreme Court had not expired. Two of the prominent and active opponents of bonding the town, Forest G. Weeks and C. W. Allis, under the advice of Attorney Hiscock, of' Syracuse, immediately went to Rochester and filed an appeal against the judgment of the County Judge. This 
appeal was argued before that court in 1872, and resulted in a judgment declaring the illegality of the bonding, and costs were allowed against the town of ninety- five dollars. 
                     Another Attempt to Bond. — Consequences of Bonding. 
    One of the active men in favor of bonding the town endeavored to get another petition signed to bond a second time for 5150,000, during the months of January, February, and March, 1872 ; but it was found that the sober second thought of 
the taxable townspeople could not be persuaded to sign such a petition, as their previous experience seemed to have awakened them to the enormity of a bonded debt of such large proportions. There is now a town in Cayuga County which bonded in aid of this New York, Ontario, and Western Midland Railroad Company, the same for which this town 
was nearly bonded.
     This company laid its tracks from the town that bonded to Auburn, and more than twenty years ago it abandoned and took up its tracks. Proceedings were instituted against the railroad to compel it to reopen its road to Auburn. The decision in these proceedings was not rendered until 1894, when  it was given in favor of the railroad company. The referee before whom it was referred by the court held that the new organization arising out of the failure of the old is not obliged to operate the road, any more- than any individual would be who had got into debt by borrowing money to invest in an enterprise which had proved disastrous. The decision was in favor of the company, and the taxpayers of the town, and especially those along the old branch road, will continue to pay their bonded indebtedness, with no prospect of the reopening of the road, which was a great convenience to them and the public as well. 
    The wonderful escape of the town of Skaneateles from a bonded debt of $250,000 was most extraordinary! 
*Skaneateles Railroad.


Syracuse Journal
March 27, 1872

    LITTLEJOHN. - Some poetaster has been racking his brains to tell the story in verse of DeWitt  C. Littlejohn’s exploits in building the Midland Railroad. The style in which it is done may be inferred from these verses:-

I will go from the lakes," he said.
"From the lakes to the great sea shore.
"Right through the heart of the Empire State.
"You shall hear the engines' roar."

"There are hills between," they said.
"I will bridge the deep ravine,
"You shall hear the tread of the iron horse
"Through your hills and valleys, I ween."

"Oswego on Ontario's Lake
"Shall reach forth her hands and say,
"To Oxford and Norwich, 'Good morrow, friends
"Pray give a call some day.' "

"New Berlin, DeRuyter and Delhi, too
"We will reach by the iron band.
"And to many a fair town on the way
"We will give a good right hand."

"And where will you get your cash," they said.
"And where is your strongbox, pray.
"You can't expect to find the gold
"Scattered along the way?"

"We shall find the cash on the way," he said.
"The farmers good and true--
"Will give their cash and bond their towns
"To pull the railroad through."

"And what will you call your pet?" they said
"And what shall its title be?
"Your wonderful railway that shall bring
"Oswego to the sea?"

"The Midland, sirs, for it shall take
"New York by a willing hand
"And wed her to Oswego fair
"By a mystic iron band."

"Well, when we hear the engines' puff
"And hear the roar of the coming train
"Then we'll believe in your Midland road
"But your words seem idle and vain."

"We have heard the puff of the iron horse
"We have heard the roar of the train.
"And we know the Midland is a fact
"And ours the words so vain."

Old Shawangunk may lift her head
And hurl her rocks in vain.
She shall hear the tread of the iron horse
And the roar of the coming train.

And proud New York, with open arms
In eighteen seventy-three;
Shall greet her sister from the lakes
With a welcome glad and free.
Chenango Union
Wed., March 27, 1872

A Snow Blockade    

    The DeRuyter Road was entirely blocked up for nearly the whole week. The train which left Norwich on Tuesday did not reach DeRuyter until Thursday - some of the passengers being compelled to take up quarters at farm houses along the line. It appears that the engine got out of water and left the train, to procure a supply, but found it impossible to get back to the train for a day or two. The train which left Norwich on Tuesday did not return until Saturday. 
                                  ___
From annual report of the New York & Oswego Midland - Oswego Daily Times, March 27, 1872
   84 locomotives, 51 passenger coaches, 30 baggage, mail and express cars, 359 box and stock cars, 609 flat cars, 17 cabooses, 40 gondolas, 96 gravel and ore cars,196 four wheel coal cars, and six snow plows. The company has a contract for 1,600 freight cars to be delivered at the rate of 40 per month or as much faster as their wants  may require. Contract for 26 locomotives to be delivered during the spring and summer. Intended to contract immediately for 25 additional locomotives which with the power on hand will supply wants for a year to come.
    From DeRuyter to Cortland the road was opened for regular business on June 5, 1872. At Cortland connect with the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira. The western extension of the road, a portion of which was under contract at the last annual meeting, has been completed to Scipio Centre and was opened for traffic December 16, 1872. Surveys have been made for its further extension to the Niagara river at an early day, sowing a line easily constructed, and with a large local business. An earnest desire is felt and expressed by the inhabitants of the several towns and counties through which it is proposed to locate, to have the road speedily built, and they will contribute liberally for that purpose. Western roads burdened with a heavy traffic and limited by the present insufficient outlets for their business look to the completion of our road to Buffalo or the Niagara river for relief.

Cortland Democrat
Friday, March 29, 1872

    New Arrangement
              ____
    The Directors of the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad held a meeting at Ithaca last Tuesday for the purpose of considering a proposition for right of way or trackage by the Midland Company.
The Midland Company offer to give the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Company one third of all moneys received by them for passengers and freight from abroad carried by them over the road from this place to Freeville, and two-thirds of all moneys received by by the Midland Company for the carrying of passengers and freight taking passage or being shipped within ten miles of the road from this place to Freeville.
    Or in other words, the Midland Company agree to pay two-thirds of all moneys received by them for passengers nd freight carried by them over the road from this place to Freeville, and would naturally be transported by the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Company if the Midland had no right of trackage over this road; one third or two-thirds (as the case may be) of the amount received by the Midland Company for transportation over ten miles of road from this place to Freeville.
    The Midland Company also agree to transport for the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Company, or allow them to transport with their own cars, coal over the line of the Midland to Utica. The two companies have also agreed to unite in making a through line to Utica, over the two lines to be operated and by an for the benefit of both companies.
    The two companies have also agreed to build a Union Depot on South Main Street, in this village, to be used by both companies, and to stand for all time. All of the propositions submitted by the officers of the Midland Company were accepted by the directors of the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Company, and were ratified at the meeting last Tuesday.

Chenango Telegraph
April 17, 1872

     Midland Machine Shop
                    ____
    Considerable importance has been manifested by our citizens at the non-performance of the agreement on the part of the Midland officials in regard to the establishment of repair machine shops in this village. It was upon this agreement that our corporation was bonded to the sum of $75,000; $50,000 of which was for the DeRuyter branch, and $25,000 for the erection of buildings for for shops, &c., and the company agreed to erect division repair shops in Norwich, equal in capacity to any other on the line, and sufficient to perform the repairs incident and necessary for the two divisions ending here, and the branches.
    We confess, that while we have shared to a considerable extent in this impatience, we have always had an abiding faith that the contract made with our representatives would be in good faith, sooner or later be carried out, and we have heretofore found in the poverty of the company, a ready excuse for their failure to do so.
   The company were loth to take from their construction fund the means which were necessary to complete the road to New York, and apply it to the building of shops, which were at the time not absolutely necessary at any other point other than at Oswego. Now, however, they find it bad policy to be compelled to haul disabled cars, engines, &c. from the vicinity one hundred miles to Oswego for repairs, and then return them again to the place of departure, and hence they have commenced the operation of their works here.
    We last week made a visit to the round house and machine hope, and were surprised at the progress made in the fitting up of the repair shops. We found there several forges already erected, and a large quantity of shafting in place, all of which was occupied  in operating the several forges, lathes, planers, drills &c., necessary. The shops are supplied with quite a number of these machines as well as with a fine engine from the Ames works in Oswego. All the machinery is from the celebrated Philadelphia Manufactory, and, is the best and most complete that is made, and are withal, perfect models of symmetry and beauty.
    The works are under the superintendence of Mr. Charles Scruton, formerly of the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg shops at Rome, who, by the way, is most thoroughly competent and attentive to his duties. He has under his direction now, something like thirty hands, and everything about the shops moves along with great regularity and precision.
    Within a few days, other lathes will be added to the machinery. All the cars and locomotives from this section are now repaired here, and it is almost surprising to see with what promptness Mr. Scruton turns out his work with the small force at his command.
    The round house is to be enlarged this year and capacity dded for several more engines. Its present capacity is nine locomotives, and it is often full. Under the prudent direction of Mr. Scruton we look at no distant day for the rapid growth of these works until it shall attain dimensions which shall satisfy the most fastidious of our citizens.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., May 8, 1872

The Auburn Branch 
    The westward progress of the Midland is of deep interested to the people of Norwich. As a new link will, in a few days, be added to the Midland chain, we send you a few notes from the Auburn Branch.  
    From DeRuyter to Cortland, the iron is laid, except about one mile, to connect with the Ithaca road. This portion of the road will be ready for business by the first of June. The distance is 20 miles. Cuyler, 4 miles from DeRuyter, is the first station from DeRuyter.  
    This is a small village, but the town is one of the largest cheese producing towns in the State, having no less than twelve cheese factories within its bounds. Here the road strikes the rich and beautiful valley of the Tioughnioga. From Cuyler to Cortland, the grade is very light, passing the entire distance on the alluvial flats of the river.  
    Truxton, five miles from Cuyler, is an enterprising village, and contains two good-sized grist mills, one woolen factory, one large cooper shop, two steam sawmills, six stores, two hotels, and is one of the best points on the Auburn branch, for freight and passengers.  
    East Homer is a small village in the town of Homer, five miles from Truxton, and six from Cortland.  
    The road passes on the eastern and southern border of Cortland village, to the junction of the Ithaca and Cortland road, in the extreme southern portion of the village.  
    From Cortland west, the I. & C. R.R. is open to Freeville, ten miles; thence ten miles more west to Ithaca. From Freeville north, the line passes through the northern portion of the town of Dryden, into the town of Lansing, where it joins the celebrated Murdock like, about four miles from Freeville. The Murdock line passes through the towns of Genoa and Venice, in Cayuga County, on this line, the grading has been mostly done for years.  
    H.D. Leonard has the contract for grading from Freeville to the north line of the town of Venice, to which the iron will be laid by Sept. 1st, 1872. This portion of Cayuga and Tompkins counties, is a wheat producing country, and the farmers expect to find a market for their grain on the line of the Midland. The distance from Freeville to the north line of Venice, is 23 miles. A gravel train is now completing the road between DeRuyter and Cortland.

Cortland Democrat
Friday, May 10, 1872

    The Directors of the Utica, Chenango and Cortland Railroad Company are engaged in negotiating for the right f way from the Tioughnioga River to the point where their line crosses the track of the Syracuse and Binghamton road. As soon as the right of way is secured, contractor Greene intense to commence the work of grading this part of the road. It is the intention of the Company to have the track down from this place to Cincinnatus the coming summer.
   The work of grading on the Truxton branch from Port Watson street to South Main street is progressing, and will probably be completed about a week from this time.*

*This line was only graded and never went into operation.

Chenango Union
Wed., May 15, 1872

                       Railroad Items
                            ____
    The Freeville correspondent of the Ithacan writes as follows in relation to railroad matters in that town and vicinity: “The Midland Railroad work here, and from this point to and along the old Murdock line to the north line of Venice, has now reached its full height of activity. Squads of carpet, gangs of men and teams, are on nearly every mile of their road, and every appearance indicates an so does the statement of President Littlejohn, that the iron will be laid up to that point, long before the end of this year.
    All the distance from Freeville to the north town line of Venice, the grading is in the hands of Mr. H.D. Leonard, a long tried and able contractor of the Midland enterprise, who pays his men, his board bills, and supplies promptly, not following in the footsteps of certain 50 percent of the contractors who have infested this region for a couple of years.
  The crossing of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western track at Cortland is agreed upon and closed; the Midland track is nearly graded to the end of the Ithaca road, and the engines and labor trains of the Midland Company will be clamoring for a chance to its extension to Freeville, under their contract allowing the Midland trackage from Cortland to Ithaca.

Cortland Standard 
Tuesday, June 4, 1872

   The Midland put in a turn-table on Sunday, just west of Pendleton street. Their grading across the Randall meadow to unite with the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira R.R. was completed last week. A few days will see the connection made.
   The Truxton branch of the Midland has been put in good repair and we may expect soon to see regular passenger trains between this place and Norwich. The road bed was considerably damaged by high water in the Spring, but the repairs will obviate this difficulty hereafter.


Chenango Telegraph
Wednesday, June 5, 1872

    Open to Cortland. - The Midland was last week opened to Cortland, a distance of fifty miles westward from this village, and twenty from DeRuyter. This gives our western neighbors another means of communication eastward which they will not be slow to improve. The morning train from Cortland will arrive here at 8:45 and connect with the Midland Express (8:50) for Utica, which will make no stops between Norwich and Smith’s Valley. The Oswego train will precede the Utica train and leave passengers for Utica at Smith’s Valley.
    The opening to Cortland is an event of importance in the progress of the Midland and will add materially to the passenger and freight business over the “DeRuyter Branch.” It will be the quickest way of reaching the Central for the East.

Cortland Standard and Journal
June 11,1872

    The immense structure over Beardsley's Gulf on the Midland railroad, at North Lansing, is finished and ready for the ties and iron. There are fully 100 teams employed between Freeville and North Lansing;  culverts are being built, bridges constructed and the whole work is in an admirable state of forwardness.


Chenango Union
Wed., June 12, 1872

   The Branch. - Trains commenced running between this place and Cortland on Wednesday last. As soon as the work of balloting, now going on, is completed on the the Ithaca and Cortland road, trains will run direct from Ithaca to Utica, via Cortland and Norwich, in five hours’ time. The trains now leave this station at 9 a.m.and 8:30 p.m.,arriving at Cortland at 12:30 and 10:50 p.m. Returning, leave Cortland at 6:25 a.m. and 4 p.m., arriving at Norwich at 8:45 a.m. and 8 p.m.

Chenango Union
Wed., June 12, 1872

    The Freeville correspondent of the Ithacan says: The Midland Railroad Company are pushing things in this vicinity. Grading is going forward as fast as two miles per week.
  Arrangements were perfected here, last week, for sending forward their iron and other supplies from Cortland, to commence track laying as soon as June 10th, Bridging and other timber work is all done, in advance of the grading even.
   The stupendous structure at the Beardsley Gulf, using nearly 300,000 feet of timber, is fast approaching completion. One locomotive will be put on here laying iron, and as soon ass the track is laid to the M.E. Seager Station, and a branch laid there, a second locomotive will follow with ballasting. Track laying with a branch upon each side, will be put out of the Ithaca road immediately, south of the station here.

Chenango Union
Wed., June 12, 1872

  The Branch -   Trains commenced running between this place and Cortland on Wednesday last. As soon as the work of ballasting, now going on, is completed on the Ithaca and Cortland road, trains will run direct from Ithaca to Utica, via Cortland and Norwich, in five hours' time. The trains now leave this station at 9 a.m. and 8:30 p.m., arriving at Cortland at 12:30 and 10:50 p.m. Returning, leave Cortland at 6:25 a.m. and 4 p.m., arriving at Norwich at 8:45 a.m. and 8 p.m. 

Democratic Republican, Hamilton
June 13, 1872

Midland Open to Cortland
    A gentleman who came from Homer, N.Y.,  and arrived here yesterday morning, says it is now almost like a dream to find one’s self here in but a little over three hours after starting from that place. It has formerly taken all day to get from one place to the other. The difference is made by the opening of the Midland line from DeRuyter to Cortland, and the running of trains in connection in such a manner that one leaving Cortland at 6:25 A.M. reaches this place at 9:12 A.M. and passengers from Cortland to Albany or further East save time by taking this new route.

Cortland Standard
Tuesday, June 18, 1872

    The experiment of rising water from the earth in this village, in large quantities, is to be tried by the Midland R.R. Messrs. Brewer and Winter are driving pipes for a gang of wells near the site of the proposed depot on South Main street, and the water is to be raised into a tank by a wind-mill. 
Arrangements for an excursion and picnic at Norwich, on Saturday of this week, are being made by the officers of the Presbyterian Sunday School, with the officers of the Midland Railroad Co. They anticipate a good time. A general invitation is extended. If satisfactory arrangements are made, hand-bills will be issued and circulated, giving full particulars. Everyone will want to go over this new road to Norwich. 

Cortland Standard
Tuesday, July 9, 1872

    Auburn has lost the repair shops of the New York Central Railroad. They are going to try to secure the repair shops of the Midland. 
    The new track of the Ithaca & Cortland Division of the U.I.&E. R.R. Co., in this village, uniting with the Midland, was completed last week, and the union of the two tracks perfected. A raised platform has also been built from the track to the depot, thereby affording an easy and convenient means of getting on or off the trains.

Cortland Standard
Tuesday, July 30, 1872

And now the fare on the Midland between Cortland and Utica has been reduced to $2.17. The 6:25 a.m. on the Midland arrives in Utica at 11 a.m. and no change of cars. Returning, leave Utica at 6 p.m., arriving in Cortland at 10:50 p.m. The trains that leave this place at 2:50 p.m. arrive in Utica at 8:50 p.m. Ties are laid down into Lansing and Cayuga County. 
Since the withdrawal of the third train from the Ithaca & Cortland R.R., the work of ballasting has been pushed forward with much energy. They have the steam shovel of the Midland, which makes quick work in loading a gravel train. It is at present at work in the gravel bank below McLean. It will not take long at the present rate to make the road bed as smooth and solid as any new road can expect to be.

Cortland Standard & Journal
Tuesday, Aug. 13, 1872

   The New York & Oswego Midland Railway and the American Merchants Union Express Company's offices have been removed to the premises of the Midland Railway on South Main street. Passengers can now procure tickets for stations on the line at the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad depot. 

Cortland Standard
Aug. 14, 1872

    Fare Reduced -   The local fare on the Auburn Branch of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad, from Norwich to Cortland and all intermediate stations is now three cents per mile. Morning and evening Express Trains run between Cortland and Utica, via Norwich, without change of cars, connecting at Utica with Special Express Trains on the New York Central Railroad. Passengers leaving Norwich at 8:50 a.m., arriving in New York at 6:30 p.m. Leave Norwich at 6:30 p.m., arriving in New York at 7 a.m. Returning, leave New York at 10 a.m., arriving in Norwich at 8:20 p.m. 

Cortland Standard
Tues., Aug. 27, 1872

    On Thursday forenoon last several railroad men, of Auburn, visited our village to look over the lay of the land, preparatory to deciding whether or not the Midland from Cortland to Freeville and the old Murdock line, is the most feasible route to unite that city with our village. They had been to our village overland on the Homer and Auburn line as now under discussion. Hon. J.W. Merchant, the resident Midland director, invited some of our leading citizens and the press to make a little excursion with them on the Midland. 
    The party were accompanied by Engineer Gilbert of the Midland, and Engineer Knight. The car was run up the valley to East Homer, and here Engineer Gilbert explained the easy grade of the line through this village as adopted by the Midland, and the heavy grade and costly construction of the line necessary to get over into the Homer valley in order to build the line on the proposed route across to Auburn. 
    Then the party was carried west to Freeville, and over the Ithaca & Cortland track, and thence over the Midland road to the Murdock line  * (see below)  as far as the rails are laid. We do not know precisely what action the Auburn gentlemen will be likely to adopt after this investigation, but it looks very much as though the Midland over the Murdock route. The company was a jolly one. The morning as fine and invigorating after the storm of the day previous. There was a noted surgeon of the party in case of an accident. An undertaker, if the patients fell under the surgeon; a Sheriff to arrest the careless directors; eminent lawyers to prosecute the case before the court; and ye reporter of the press to give a full and impartial account of all that occurred - if not more.  

 * This is the nickname of the  Lake Ontario, Auburn & New York , a line graded from near Ithaca to Auburn in the 1850s but never completed. It was nicknamed for Lyman Murdock of Venice Center, its chief promoter. 

Clinton Courier
Thurs., Aug. 29, 1872

    The Utica, Ithaca & Elmira R.R. - The Georgetown corespondent of the Oneida Union writes:
    “The surveyors under the direction of Hon. McGraw, of Cortland, were in town last week and run out the extension of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira R.R. Commencing at the Otselic  trestle-work, they kept the line of the creek nearly all the way, being only a few rods east of it opposite our village. 
    The final location of it will be made next week, upon the return of the surveyors, who we’re not able to be in attendance this week. It is their intention to connect with and pass over the track of the Syracuse & Chenango Valley R.R. to Earlville, thence to Utica.

Chenango Telegraph
Thursday, September 5, 1872

  Local Straws
    The New Era of DeRuyter says that on the train from DeRuyter to Norwich, on Monday morning, a vote was taken which resulted 12 for Grant,5 for Greeley, and two doubtful. The two doubtful said they had hitherto been strong Greeley men, but the more they thought of the matter, the more doubtful they were for Greeley, and that they were now so doubtful that they would not vote.
   A friend gives the result of a ballot taken on the Thursday Evening train from Norwich to DeRuyter.

DeRuyter New Era
Sept. 5, 1872

    J.H. DeLamater of our town has within a few days bought, paid for and shipped in this vicinity nearly $17,000 worth of cheese. This we trust will have a salutary effect on the money market in our midst.

Chenango Union
Fri., Sept. 6, 1872

    D.L.& W. Railroad -  On Sunday last, a gang of workmen removed a portion of the trestle-work from the Auburn Branch, in this village, at the point where the D.L.& W. passes under it. A substantial iron structure was then placed upon the abutments which had been previously built, and on Monday the trains passed over it on time. It is a good job. 
   The passenger depot is enclosed, and the roof is being covered with slate. The frame of the freight depot is up, and will soon be enclosed. Iron is laid from the junction south of the village, as far north as Mitchell Street, and the construction train crossed the swing bridge near the lime kiln on Monday. The first train crossed East Street on Tuesday evening. A large amount of iron is laid north of the village; and as soon as the swing bridge near the blast furnaces is completed, we presume the road will be ready for business.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Sept. 17, 1872

   Five hundred inhabitants of Lansing and Genoa met at the junction near Libertyville to celebrate the connecting of the Midland Railroad with the old Murdock line on Sept. 6. About 4 p.m. Superintendent Murphy summoned his forces and commenced placing ties and rails to finish the connection. 
   The systematic manner in which the work progressed proved him master of his profession. In about one hour he had completed his work of lying 30 rods of track necessary to intersect the old line. Giving the signal, the engineer of No. 16 moved his engine forward, and when firmly upon the Murdock line, blew the whistle. 
   A large boarding house is soon to be erected by the Midland Railroad at W.J. Osmun's in South Lansing, for accommodating men connected with track laying and ballasting. The fence builders are about to the town line, and will be down to Osmun's in a few days.      The work goes bravely on. It looks somewhat strange to see a locomotive steaming along through Lansing, which has held out so long against railroad innovations.   
Railroad Celebration 
Lansing, Sept. 5, 1872  
Editor of Standard and Journal:  
    Dear Sir: -  To-day about five hundred of the inhabitants of Lansing and Genoa met at the junction near Libertyville to celebrate the event of connecting the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad with the Old Murdock Line. 
    About 4 o'clock P.M., Superintendent Murphy summoned his forces and commenced placing ties and rails to finish the connection. The systematic manner in which the work progressed proved him master of his profession. In about one hour he had completed his work of laying the thirty rods of track necessary to intersect the old line. 
    Giving the signal, the engineer of No. 16 moved his engine forward and when firmly upon the Murdock line, pulled the valve and the steam whistle set up such a screeching as never before had been heard in the town of Lansing. The cannon boomed forth its mighty thunder, and the excited crowd sent up their loud huzzas as evidence of their enthusiasm over the long-wished event. 
    From the expression of the people present it may be inferred that Cortlandville can look forward to considerable  acquisition in regard to trade when this branch of railroad is in running order, for quite a feeling exists against the action of Auburn in regard to fixing the route. A broad section of country will then be opened for the inhabitants to avail themselves of the advantages and privileges your prosperous village affords for market and purchase of necessaries. The completion of this great enterprise is looked for by the people along the whole line, believing their prospects will be enhanced materially. 
 A GENOESE. 

Ithaca Leader
Wed., Sept. 18, 1872

The Midland 
  
Laying of the Rails across high Trestle Work at North Lansing -  A Large Crowd of People Present to witness the Work.  
                                                     ___
    Yesterday was a day of rejoicing and of congratulations for the people of Lansing. The Midland railroad which has been under process of construction the past few months, is now nearly completed through that town. It is unnecessary to say that the citizens of this hitherto railroad forsaken town, are highly gratified at this new acquisition to her traveling and shipping facilities. But a few weeks have elapsed since the work of track laying commenced at Freeville. Considering the fact that the workmen have been repeatedly delayed by being obliged to wait for grading to be done, the track from Freeville to the trestle works, (a distance of 12 miles) has been done with commendable rapidity. 
    Yesterday the track layers reached as far as the trestle work crossing the deep and wide gully at North Lansing. The crowd that was present to witness the crossing of the cars was to say the least, immense. the number is variously estimated from 1,200 to 2,000 people. It really seemed as if all Lansing and a large portion of the people of her sister towns were there. 
    But back to our subject. The trestle work is 480 feet in length, and 74 feet high from the bed of the creek. There are 40 span or bents, 12 feet apart in this piece of framework and each are well braced. We were informed that there were over 250,000 feet of hemlock timber in this structure, and that the work, saying nothing about the outlay for the material, cost $1,200. The ties on this work are placed about 16 inches apart and are of white oak timber. We understand that it is the intention of the company to fill in on either side of the crossing, which will tend to strengthen the bridge and make it much more durable. The time of crossing was at 8 minutes past 5 o'clock. 
    The train was made up of 9 platform cars, drawn by the engine "Delhi". The cars were loaded with rails and ties. On these were standing just as many men as could possibly find room. When the train had got fairly out on the structure, the Geneva Brass Band struck up "Yankee Doodle". As the "iron horse" slowly made his way over this deep chasm ( we do not refer to the bloody chasm ), the men swung their hats and cheered lustily while the ladies showed their appreciation of the occasion by swinging their handkerchiefs and clapping their hands. 
    This was indeed an exciting time, and one long to be remembered. After the cars had been unloaded, other people equally anxious as the first privileged, mounted the cars and rode back over the work. How many different trains of people passed over we cannot say, as our reporter was obliged to leave after the second train had made a crossing. One fact we have forgotten to mention, there was not, at any time the train crossed, the least perceptible quiver of the structure. This was a source of great satisfaction to all concerned. 
    The first shipment that was ever made in the town of Lansing by railroad, was made on Monday. Mr. G.D. Crittenden, of the North Lansing flouring mills, shipped on that day by the Midland railroad, one ton of flour to a firm at Freeville. That this thoroughfare will be a source of convenience, and of great benefit to the people Lansing, there can be no doubt. The sum of $75,000, for which she is bonded, is a very small sum in comparison to what she will be benefited. The town is also bonded for $25,000 to extend the road from W.A.J. Osmun's farm through to Ithaca. We cannot believe that the good people of Ithaca will let this opportunity go by, and thus lose the business to a large extent, of a very wealthy portion of our county. Farmers say that if they do not have railroad facilities to Ithaca, they shall do their trading at Auburn and Cortland. 
    The business men of Ithaca will do well to ponder these facts. The cost of this extension would be comparatively small while, the benefit derived would be great. We do not say that Lansing has any settlers who have never seen the "iron horse", but we do say that the lively interest manifested in yesterday's railroad celebration looks strangely suspicious. Never before have we seen people more pleaded with an enterprise than the people of Lansing were, apparently, yesterday. We were pleased also, and congratulate them.   
 The Midland DeRuyter Branch 
    Were it not for the five hours of waiting at Cortland, the trip from Ithaca to Utica over the Midland would be the pleasantest offered. As it is, one leaves the University depot at 7:45 A.M., and reaches Utica at 8:50 P.M. The waste of time comes of lack of connection between the Ithaca and Cortland and the Midland. When the road to Cortland shall have been put in prime condition it is thought direct connections will be made and the route will at once become popular. But this, aside.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Sept. 24, 1872

   There was another celebration in Lansing on Tuesday last (Sept. 17) upon the event of the arrival of the cars on the Midland at the great trestle bridge over Beardsley Gulf. From 1,200 to 1,500 people were present and enjoyed a ride on their own railroad. The Genoa band was there and added their music to the screech of the locomotive. This trestle work is the largest in this part of the country. It is 480 feet long and 74 feet high from the bed of the stream. 

Auburn Daily Bulletin
Friday, Nov. 1, 1872

Indian Relics 

    The workmen on the Midland railroad in Genoa, have found some interesting Indian relics in the gravel-bed which has been opened about a mile and a half north of Genoa village. The gravel-bed is a high, and deep bank, on the east side of the track, and the steam shovel which is used, is eating its way rapidly into the heart of the bank. 
    In this bank, at a considerable distance below the surface, have been found Indian skeletons, arrows, cooking utensils, and various trinkets, such as were wont to please the untutored savage. On Tuesday, a brass kettle of considerable size and in a good state of preservation, was unearthed - or ungraveled. 
    The bank is "pouring out" a great variety of these interesting relics of a departed race. The perplexing question is, how did they become embedded in this gravel-bank, several feet below the surface? Did the "noble red man" place his household goods and household gods "in cache" here when he was forced by the pale-faces to leave the tramping-ground of his ancestors? Or has this gravel-bank been thrown up since the red man roamed through this country? 
    Or are these not Indian relics after all, but indication of some Pre-Adamic race? And is the kettle mentioned above one in which they used to boil the icthyossaurus and the megatherirum, and make trilobite soup? We pause for a reply from the savans. 
    The country about Genoa was a favorite tramping-ground of the Indians. Here they used to whoop it up right lively for Logan and his predecessors. The "Indian Fields", as they are now called, extending for miles long the west bank of the Big Salmon Creek, was their corn-ground, and is now one of the richest portions of the county or State. On the east bank of the creek, two miles below Genoa, in a deep pine forest, is one of their cemeteries, in which can be seen hundreds of graves. They were buried standing, and each grave is traceable by a depression of about 2 feet, caused by the decaying and falling to pieces of the "corpus" of the occupant. 

Cortland Standard
Tues., Nov. 19, 1872

   At a meeting of the directors of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad, in Ithaca, one day last week, they located the Ithaca end of the Ithaca & Cortland division directly down the hill from its present terminus on the University grounds, to meet the Ithaca & Athens line on the flats below. The grade down the hill will be about one foot in nine, and it is expected to use a Mount Washington locomotive to make trips up and down the mountain.
   The trunk line will not go to Ithaca at all, but will diverge just below Varna to the left, and striking the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad south of Mott's Corners in Caroline, thence to Candor, Spencer, Van Ettenville, Horseheads, &c.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, January 12, 1872

   DeRuyter. - The telegraph office is in the depot, and the passenger trains now start from the same place. They do not stop any more at the Utica street crossing. he telegraph line is completed to Cortland, and messages can be sent directly from this place to Cortland.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Dec. 24, 1872

The Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad. - The Corning Journal of two weeks ago gives the following information:
  The board of directors of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad met in Corning last Tuesday, and located the route between Corning and Horseheads.
   The road will run from this village along the track to the mills a mile east, passing between the mill site and the dwellings opposite the river in the direction of where Gibson's planing mill stood, and will thence run parallel with the Erie Railway nearly to West Junction near Horseheads and thence to Utica, by next July. h. Pritchard, A. Olcott and J.N. Hungerford, the bonding commissions of the town of Corning, subscribed for one thousand dollars of the stock, and will issue the bonds therefor in accordance with the provisions of the petition of tax-payers asking for the bonding of this town to that amount.
 The interests of the tax-payers will be duly protected. The railroad will be found to be a good investment financially, and also be of signal advantage to the business interests of Corning. This road is of the gauge of the Northern Central, Midland and New York Central. It will be extended eastward as rapidly as possible and thus be made a highway from Boston to the great west.
The telegraph poles on the Midland are set from Freevlle to Osmun’s Station, South Lansing. The poles are of the best material, ad put up firmly and with care. The iron that holds the insulators is inserted in the end of the pole instead of on the  side, which is claimed to be an improvement.

Oneida Dispatch
January 17, 1873

    DeRuyter commenced the new year with four general country stores, two hardware stores, two drug stores, one dry good store, one book store, five groceries or saloons, three flour and feed shops, two meat markets, one jewelry  shop, one bank, one cabinet shop, one foundry, one tannery, one harness shop, one taylor shop, one boot and shoe store, one hotel, one tavern and one Inn, five lawyers, three good lawyers, six physicians and here resident ministers.
    We have quite a village, and if more manufacturing could be started here we should have more prosperity.  The Midland has given a new impetus to our village. Last year six new dwelling houses were put up. This year there will be double that number built. We are doing as well perhaps as any of our sister villages, with perhaps  the exception of Morrisville Station, where the increase in dwellings has been 100 percent the past year.

Chenango Union
Thurs., January 23, 1873

Fatal Accident on the Auburn Branch  
    On Monday forenoon last, the body of a man was discovered on the ice, near the first railroad bridge crossing the main stream of the Canasawacta Creek, above Frinkville, about five and a half miles from this village. The person who made the discovery drove to Frinkville, and notified several persons of the fact, who at once proceeded to the spot. Coroner Ormsby, of Plymouth, was notified, and the body was removed to the Hotel of E. Dimmick, where an inquest was held on Monday evening and Tuesday morning. Augustus C. Aldrich, Asaph Dimmick, Horace Johnson, John Trass, Frank Crumb, and Orrin Sexton, composed the jury.  
    From the evidence given by the conductor and hands upon the train, it appears that the name of the deceased was Peter McDermott; that he was employed as forward brakeman upon the train which leaves this place for Cortland at 9:55; that on Monday morning he was not missed from the train until it reached Beaver Meadow, when it was supposed he had been left behind at Norwich, as he was to go on an errand to the machine shop, about the time the train left. He undoubtedly slipped from a car, and falling upon the ice, was instantly killed, as he neck was found to be broken, and the base of his skull crushed. The verdict of the jury was in accordance with the facts. 
Brooklyn Daily Eagle
January 29, 1873

   The exemption given to the New York & Midland Railroad Company from the payment of taxes for ten years, having been repealed by the last Legislature, the tax collectors have lately seized freight carried by the road, for non payment of taxes, and yesterday Judge Blatchford, of the U.S. District Court in New York, was appeared to by the Receivers lately appointed. The Court said if Legislative aid be withheld, it will try to devise some plan for relief.

Chenango Union
Thurs., March 6, 1873

               Railroad Notes.
                     ___
    The Scipio correspondent of the Auburn Democrat contributed the following to that paper:
    “I have just returned from Scipio Summit R.R. station, and found that the Midland R.R. is a fixed fact, opening a market which make the farmers feel glorious. To give you a little idea of what the road is doing be will shown herewith: At this point since the 10th of January, 1873, there have been loaded six cars per week with produce; have received 50,000 feet of lumber and sold nearly all of it; fifty tons of coal and selling it for $6.50  and $6.70; 20 of pork, three of apple jelly; two of wool; and one and one half of dried apples; 25 barrels of green apples; and nearly 20 tons of wagon hubs for the Philadelphia market.
    “Business is increasing. Farmers from Scipio, Ledyard and Springport are drawing wheat, pork and barley to this point for it is the best market in the country. The Auburn markets are nowhere compared with the market which this railroad has opened, passing as it does through a country that needs every bushel of grain we have to spare, and landing it at the door of those who have to look to New York for their supplies.
    “If we want to go to New York we can, save 80 miles of travel, and all change of cars. Get on board at 6 A.M., and at 6 P.M. land in the city. When the road is completed from Buffalo to New York, it will be the shortest, quickest and best route from Buffalo to New York, and must do its share of business and compete successfully with any road running from the great west to the sea board.
    “I learn from those who pretend to know that the depot at Venice has done nearly double the amount hat they have at Scipio  and the business is on the increase.”

Chenango Union
Thurs., March 27, 1873

    A Midland Brakeman Killed
               ____
    On Friday morning of last week, a brakeman on the Auburn Branch work train, named Gamaliel W. Matthews, was crushed to death between the engine tender and the wall, in the Midland round-house in this village, while attempting to to place a link in the rear of the tender, for attachment to the train on which he worked.
   The space between the tender and the wall, when it is properly placed in the stall in the round-house, is only 12 or 14 inches. The unfortunate man happened to be in that narrow space, while the fireman, not knowing he was there, ran the engine back a little, to allow the removal of an obstruction which had been placed in front of the driving wheels while while the engine was being repaired the day before. It was unusual to replace a link before the engine was run out of the stall, and therefore not expected that a workman was exposed to danger by reversing the engine, which is not an uncommon thing to do, for several causes.
    The accident occurred about half-past six, but it was not known until nearly an hour later, when his lifeless body was found in a partly kneeling position, leaning against the wall at the end of the track where the engine had stood during the night. Upon examination it was found that his neck was broken, and his chest crushed in. The train went out on duty, the absence of Matthews not accounted for by scenes or unavoidable detention.
    Deceased was formerly station agent at Stockbridge, Madison Co., and came to this place in October last, soon after which he became brakeman on McDonald’s gravel train, between Norwich and DeRuyter. He is highly spoken of as a citizen, and leaves a wife and one child in dependent circumstances. His age was 37 years. Funeral services were held at his late residence in this village on Sunday last, by Rev. S. Scoville; and on Monday morning the remains were conveyed to Deansville, Oneida Co., for internment.
    An inquest was held by Coroner Hand, on Friday, and he verdict of the jury exonerated all from any blame for the accident, as is evidently proper in this case. The finding is as follows: “He came to his death by an accident, in being crushed between the wall and an engine, at the round house of the N.Y. & O. Midland Railroad, while in the act of placing a coupling link in the ender of said engine. And we further  find that no blame is attached to any officer or employee of said Railroad, on account of said death.”



Chenango Union
Thurs., April 3, 1873

The Auburn Branch has been useless for a week, neither train nor mail having arrived from Cortland since Wednesday evening. A work train did get through on Saturday evening; but the storm of Sunday - the worst of the season - blocked the track again. It will probably be opened within a day or two, unless another storm sets in. 

Chenango Union
Thurs., April 10, 1873

Railroad Accident  

    Another accident occurred in this village on Wednesday evening of last week, a few rods north of the Midland depot, which resulted in the death of Charles Bates, son of Arthur Bates, late of New Berlin. While a construction train from DeRuyter, with two snow plows attached, was approaching the switch near where the branch connects with the main line, Bates attempted to jump upon the rear of the forward snow plow, when it is supposed he slipped and fell, the second snow plow striking him as he lay on the outside of the track.  
   He was picked up and carried to the residents of his brother-in-law, Charles D. Smith, where he lingered between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, when he expired. It was found that seven or eight ribs on the left side were broken, and the substance of the lungs injured. He was conscious until five minutes of his death, and repeatedly stated that he alone was responsible for what had occurred. His age was eighteen years.  
   What could have induced the young man to attempt the perilous leap upon the snow plow, is not known; but it is supposed he thought it to be the train upon which Mr. Smith is conductor, although he was never known to make a like attempt before. The deceased, with his mother, resided in this place, Mr. Bates being engaged in traveling through the west, on business. Although efforts were made by telegraph to ascertain his whereabouts, they were unsuccessful. The remains were taken to New Berlin on Friday, for internment. 

Cortland Standard
Tues., April 29, 1873

    A platform has been constructed where the Midland crosses the Syracuse & Binghamton Railroad in this village, and passengers on the Ithaca & Cortland, the Midland and Syracuse & Binghamton railroads are transferred there, saving the trip from the different depots on foot and by omnibus. 

Chenango Union
Thurs., May 15, 1873

    A Model conductor. -   Among the many courteous conductors in the employ of the Midland Company, we take pleasure in making special mention of our townsman, David Shattuck, whose route is between Utica and Scipio. A gentleman of strict integrity, looking as well to the interests of his employers as to the accommodation of the public, he has won the confidence of the Company, and stepped from a lower rank to the responsible position he now so competently fills. Ever attentive to his duties, he has a pleasant word for all, and a happy faculty of making those whose good fortune it is to travel with him, feel at their ease. He is deservedly popular with the traveling public. 


New York Tribune
Tues., May 27, 1873

                  The Midland Railroad
                              ____
Details of the New Organization - Mr. Littlejohn to Push the Building of the Western Division.
                              ____
    The principal directors and stock and bondholders of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad held another meeting, yesterday afternoon, for the purpose of devising measures for relieving the road from the financial embarrassments which now surround it. George Opdyke has been elected President, with the understanding that the new syndicate will furnish subscriptions to the securities of the company to the amount of $4,000,000. It was originally understood that the subscriptions should be $5,000,000, but on the assembling of the syndicate it was proposed to reduce it to $3,000,000. This latter figure, however, was objected to, as being entirely too small for practical purposes, and the syndicate then resolved to make it $4,000,000.
    At their meeting, yesterday, they reported subscriptions to the amount of $3,700,000, the additional $300,000 to be forthcoming within a few days. After satisfying the immediate obligations of the Company, the balance of the subscriptions to the $3,000,000 loan will be devoted to the construction of the Western Division of the road, which extends from Cortland to Buffalo, under the supervision of ex-President DeWitt C. Littlejohn, who will remain as director. It is said that the syndicate embraces Drexel, Morgan & Co., Naylor & Co., Russel Sage, and others. Conrad S. Jordan, E.A. Wickes and Charles H. Perkins have been elected directors to fill the vacancies caused by the resignation of Messrs. Culver, Ames and Foster.
    The other officers have not been fully determined upon, but it is understood that Mr. Schlesinger of the firm of Naylor & Co., will be elected Treasurer, in accordance with the syndicate programme.
    There are several persons named for the vacancy caused by the resignation of Vice President Culver, but no one has yet been selected.
    The bill authorizing the directors of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad to increase the capital stock $5,000,000 passed the Legislature. Gov. Dix was about to veto it, on the ground that the General Railroad law of 1850, under which this road was organized, gave that right exclusively to the stockholders when the friends of the measure asked permission to withdraw and amend so as to conform to existing law.      

  
Chenango Telegraph
April 24, 1873

Midland Branches

    Engineers in the employ of the Midland Road are making surveys through Monroe and Genesee counties for a railroad running from Auburn to the International Bridge. The line as run crosses the Genesee river at Scottsville; thence northwesterly, crossing the Central road near Churchville; thence westerly through the towns of Bergen, Byron, Elba, Oakland and Alabama. It is understood the last three named towns are willing to aid in the construction of the road, provided the route now proposed is adopted. They are rich, populous, agricultural towns, but now without railroad facilities.

Madison Observer, Morrisville
Wednesday, May 14, 1873

   We were near the railroad in DeRuyter the other day about one o’clock and noticed two young girls go on to te Institute trestle from the bridge and attempt to walk it. They were about half way over when the whistle screamed and the train emerged from the deep cut at Rider’s hill. 
    A spectator seeing how it was, shouted “get off that trestle!” The girls ran, then stopped. The train came thundering down and the spectator shouted again, “get off that trestle!” They started like frightened pigeons, then hesitated bewildered by the suddenness of the situation, then one leaped, as for life, followed by the other, both alighting in the soft mud of the old pond.


New York Tribune
Tues., May 27, 1873


                  The Midland Railroad
                              ____
Details of the New Organization - Mr. Littlejohn to Push the Building of the Western Division.
                              ____
    The principal directors and stock and bondholders of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad held another meeting, yesterday afternoon, for the purpose of devising measures for relieving the road from the financial embarrassments which now surround it. George Opdyke has been elected President, with the understanding that the new syndicate will furnish subscriptions to the securities of the company to the amount of $4,000,000. It was originally understood that the subscriptions should be $5,000,000, but on the assembling of the syndicate it was proposed to reduce it to $3,000,000. This latter figure, however, was objected to, as being entirely too small for practical purposes, and the syndicate then resolved to make it $4,000,000.
    At their meeting, yesterday, they reported subscriptions to the amount of $3,700,000, the additional $300,000 to be forthcoming within a few days. After satisfying the immediate obligations of the Company, the balance of the subscriptions to the $3,000,000 loan will be devoted to the construction of the Western Division of the road, which extends from Cortland to Buffalo, under the supervision of ex-President DeWitt C. Littlejohn, who will remain as director. It is said that the syndicate embraces Drexel, Morgan & Co., Naylor & Co., Russel Sage, and others. Conrad S. Jordan, E.A. Wickes and Charles H. Perkins have been elected directors to fill the vacancies caused by the resignation of Messrs. Culver, Ames and Foster.
    The other officers have not been fully determined upon, but it is understood that Mr. Schlesinger of the firm of Naylor & Co., will be elected Treasurer, in accordance with the syndicate programme.
    There are several persons named for the vacancy caused by the resignation of Vice President Culver, but no one has yet been selected.
    The bill authorizing the directors of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad to increase the capital stock $5,000,000 passed the Legislature. Gov. Dix was about to veto it, on the ground that the General Railroad law of 1850, under which this road was organized, gave that right exclusively to the stockholders when the friends of the measure asked permission to withdraw and amend so as to conform to existing law.   
   
Chenango Telegraph 
Thursday, May 29, 1873

                     Littlejohn Resigned.
                           ___
    The financial troubles of the Midland Railroad have at last resulted in the resignation of Mr. Littlejohn from the Presidency. At a meeting of the Directors in New York on Monday the Presidency was tendered to Geoge Opdyke the well known Banker.
    On the same day a meeting of prominent persons interested in the road was held at No.111 Liberty street, New York. Mr. George Opdyke refused the Presidency of the road unless $5,000,000 were released to pay off its debts and build its missing connections. A compromise was finally arrived at, by which he agreed to accept the presidency if $4,000,000 were raised. At last accounts yesterday $3,700,000 had been subscribed, and it seemed likely that the remaining $300,000 would be obtained.
    We hope the arrangement will be carried out and in the meantime suspend comment, except to say we believe the new administration will restore confidence, especially if backed up by the strong subscriptions proposed. We shall probably be able to give full particulars in our next.

Chenango Telegraph
June 5, 1873

The Midland Difficulties. - There is nothing specially new in regard to the recent financial difficulties and official changes in the Midland Railroad. The change in the presidency seems to have been amicably effected, and so of all changes in the directorship.
  The company has just emerged from a severe winter which, with its extended lines and branches, involved a heavy expense with comparatively light receipts. The consequence was a deficiency of fund amounting to some $50,000 to pay accrued indebtedness. 
    Failing to place its first mortgage bonds upon the western extension, its embarrassments were increased by suits brought by some of its creditors. A consultation resulted in the official changes already announced, and the raising of $4,000,000 to pay indebtedness and push forward the western line. Mr. Littlejohn has displayed great energy in pushing this enterprise and the public will expect the same from Mr. Opdyke and his associates. They are heavy capitalists and can command all the pecuniary aid required. 
         
Chenango Union
June 12, 1873

    The Machine Shops. - The frame for the addition to the Midland machine shop has been raid, and workmen are busily engaged in enclosing it. The new structure will be 40 x 120 feet, and is to be occupied by the blacksmiths and carpenters. Five forges are to be put up, one of which will be a “rail fire,” for repairing defective rails. When the new building is completed, it will afford room for the employment of a large number of hands; and the wide-awake overseer, Mr. Scruton, will be enabled to arrange the machinery and fixtures more conveniently for himself and his workmen.

Cortland Standard
Tues., July 5, 1873

Shaw vs. A Locomotive. - Our Truxton correspondent sends us the following:
On Monday, April 28th, as a man named Shaw and his little granddaughter were returning from the village of Truxton, they had to cross the Midland R.R. at Willow Grove Mills. The train was passing at the same time. The horse seemed disinclined to yield the right of way, but attempted to knock the cars off the track.
He gave a tremendous leap right against the locomotive. The shock somewhat checked the speed of the cars. Recovering a little from the stunning effects and gaining new ambition, the horse made another leap and struck the baggage cars. Thus ended the effort, the cars remaining on the track, but the horse and buggy went into a general heap.
The horse was somewhat injured - the buggy thills smashed, and Shaw and the girl slightly bruised. A correspondent from Truxton, Ed. Henry, describes the event facetiously, as follows:
'Old Shaw had an idee he could jist run over them cars (as he does, everything and everybody), but you see the cars were  too much for the old chap. It would just have tickled Shaw to knock them cars off the track, but you see he can’t run over a railway train, there is no use of his trying it again. The horses is stove up some, but I guess he will get over it. Johnnie said that his father was stabbin’ around all day, but the jar of the fall lamed him some.”
Cortland Standard
Tues., Aug. 12, 1873

    The Midland people have under consideration various plans for shortening the line of their road. One is, to build the Hancock line via Colesville, and Lisle to Freeville.  Another, and more feasible plan is, to build from Guilford Summit, southwest, to the village of Greene, thence to Smithville Flats, Willett and Gee Brook, taking the line of the Utica, Chenango & Cortland railroad, to this place.    This can be accomplished in a shorter time and with a smaller outlay than any other route. Of the U.C.& B. railroad 6 miles of the Central Valley railroad can be used in the route by widening its road-bed at a moderate expense, leaving the gap of 10 miles from Gee Brook to Smithville, and the section from Green to Guilford to be provided for.
   This line would shorten the distance from Cortland to Guilford 18 mile, and instead of the heavy grades from Cuyler to Plymouth, and from Norwich to Oxford, there would be nothing in excess of 55 feet going east. The road would pass through the village of Greene and near the villages of Smithville, Willet and Cincinnatus, securing a profitable local business. It is high time the people along the route took some steps to show its advantages and urge its claim. 

DeRuyter New Era, 
Aug. 21, 1873

    Narrow Escape. - Last Sunday two young girls residing near Crumb Hill, aged eight and five years, started for Sabbath School held at the school-house near John Wibert's, and took the railroad, walking on the track down through the woods and emerging at the high bridge known as the Wibert trestle.
    As it was Sunday and no trains in the habit of moving at that time, they passed on to the trestle within sight of their destination, and had got about two thirds of the way across at the highest point, distant seventy-five feet below, when there suddenly appeared, coming around the bend within twenty-five rods ahead of them, the morning express train from Cortland returning to Norwich, under good motion.
    The frightened children had to decide in a moment of peril. Quick as two squirrels they sprang from the rail track over the side to the braces below, where they hung to the timbers with their hands while the train halted on the trestle, and they were rescued from their dangerous situation and carried back to the opposite bank.

Chenango Union, Norwich, Thursday, Nov. 27, 1873

           About the Midland.
                   ____
Reports as to its Present Condition - The Payment in Scrip
                  ____
    There are so many rumors as to what is to become of the Midland, and so much uncertainty in relation to the scrip recently issued by the Receiver, in payment of the indebtedness of the Company to the employees, previous to his appointment, that we have condensed such items as have come under our observation during the past week, which may interest if they do not enlighten our readers.
    In the DeRuyter New Era of Thursday last (Nov. 20), there appears a lengthy article upon the apparent abandonment of the Auburn Branch, from which we clip the following:
                     Virtually Dead.
    “The road is virtually dead. The reduction of trains on all its lines prove it so. On this, the Auburn branch, the trains have been reduced to one per day; that is to say, it leaves Norwich on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 10:05 P.M., reaches Cortland at 1:30 P.M., remains there twenty-five and a half hours, or until 3 P.M., of Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. During this time the engine must be kept fired to prevent the water from freezing in the boiler, consuming nearly as much fuel as would be required to run to Norwich.
    “The hands stay in the cars and keep up fires, and as many of them reside in Norwich they would prefer to run back rather than remain, their pay would amount to no more, and yet we who are on the line are deprived of half our mails and half of our facilities for getting out, and for what object? The depot at this place was yesterday supplied with one tone of coal, just about sufficient to last two weeks. It points to a deliberate plan to close our road entirely and deprive the towns of the advantages which have cost them so dearly.
   “This is done on the plea that the road is not paying its expenses. We aver that it is susceptible of proof from facts and figures kept of the earnings of the road, that this branch has paid more than double its expenses, and was doing so, up to the time of taking off the trains.
     “Take for example one case.  Figures show that the road received for freight from the little village of Genoa alone, during the month of October $1,800, and for the first fifteen days of November, $900 - and that there is a large quantity of stuff there now, that has not moved for the want of cars in which to transport it. And yet the offices beyond Freeville have been closed, the hands all discharged, and the new timetable provides for running a train there and back once a week only. This statement applies to freight alone, having no reference to passenger business or receipts for carrying the mail. If this be true, who will believe that the road cannot be run so as to pay expenses and yet yield an income besides?”
                     Silent Tracks and Deserted Depots.
The Auburn News says: “The Midland Railroad in this section has literally played out.  Last Sunday morning a train went south, from Scipio clearing the depots along the line to Freeville of their furniture. This morning all was still along the line. No screech of the whistle or rattle of cars break the solitude; no plumes of steam floating on the frosty air; no more daily mails; not nothing  but the silent track and the deserted depots.”
           Wouldn’t Take a Red Hot Stove.
    A Lansing correspondent of an Ithaca exchange says:
   “The depot agents on the Midland Railroad in Lansing, it seems, were not quite so sharp as the one at Genoa in regard to the moving of the furniture from the depot last Sunday morning. The order was that all furniture should be in readiness for immediate removal. But when the train from Scipio, south, arrived at Genoa, the stove in the depot was red hot and as it was found rather inconvenient to handle it, it was left. That the agent has so much toward his pay, sure.”
           No Business
   The Moravia Register has the following:
“It  really looks as though the people in the western towns of the County were to be deprived of their newly acquired railroad accommodations.  The recent action of the company looks like an abandonment of the line west of Freeville. They have already discharged their agents,  closed their offices, and are running but one train a week each way - go west on Wednesday to the terminus, in Scipio, and return on Thursday.
    “Agent Parsons, of the Southern central, at this station, has been notified not to accept any more freight to be shipped west on that line.  This action must also cause serious derangement to the mail facilities, and be the source of a great inconvenience to the people living along the line of the road in this and Tompkins County.  We regret, for the sake of our neighbors over west, that the road cannot be made profitable to the Company.”
             More Gossip.
The  Ithaca Journal says there is talk that the branch of the Midland extending from Freeville to Scipio will be operated this winter by the Ithaca & Cortland Company.  

Chenango Union
Thurs., July 3, 1873

Railroad Accident  

   John Fehan, a laborer on the Midland Railroad, met with a serious and singular accident on Saturday last. Being in the caboose of a work train on the Branch, in company with others, who were "fooling", and throwing water upon each other, Fehan escaped from the caboose, and while climbing the ladder to its top, he was struck by the spout of the Beaver Meadow water tank, which the train was then passing, and knocked to the ground, falling upon his back. He was brought to this village, and is now under the care of Dr. Mosher. No bones were broken, and the patient is doing well. 

Hamilton Democratic Republican
Thurs., Aug. 18, 1873

    Last Sunday two young girls residing near Crumb Hill, aged eight and five years, started for Sabbath School held at the school-house near John Wibert's, and took the railroad, walking on the track down through the woods and emerging at the high railroad bridge known as the Wibert trestle. As it was Sunday and no trains in the habit of moving at that time, they had passed on the trestle within sight of their destination, and had got about two thirds of the way across, at the highest point, distance 75 feet below, when there suddenly appeared coming around the bend within 25 rods ahead of them, the morning express train from Cortland returning to Norwich under good motion. 
    The frightened children had to decide in a moment of peril. Quick as two squirrels they sprang from the track over the side to the braces below where they hung to the timbers with their hands while the train halted on the trestle, and they were rescued from their dangerous situation and carried back to the opposite bank.
(From DeRuyterNew Era) 

Cortland Standard
Tues., Sept. 9, 1873

Midland R.R. - Auburn Division -  There has been another change of time on the Auburn Division of the Midland.  

 Going West.   
   Mixed Train  - Leaves Norwich 10:05 a.m.  
- reaches Cortland at 1:30 p.m.  
- reaches Scipio Centre at 4 p.m. 
 Express    - Leaves Norwich 7:40 p.m.   
- reaches Cortland 9:40 p.m.   
- reaches Scipio at 11:40 p.m.    
 Going East.   
   Express     - Leaves Scipio Centre 7 a.m.  
- reaches Cortland 9 a.m.  
- reaches Norwich 11 a.m. 
 Mixed   - Leaves Scipio Centre 12:10 p.m.   
- reaches Cortland 3 p.m.   
- reaches Norwich 6:30 p.m.  

Cortland Standard
Sep. 16, 1873

    The Midland railroad is building yards and adding conveniences for shipping cattle, horses and livestock, near he depot. They have purchased 100 new freight cars for this purpose, to be delivered next week.

Oswego Daily Times
Friday, Sept. 19, 1873

                     The Midland Difficulties
                                   ____
Losses in Oswego - The Men Still at Work - Arrears - Midland Bonds.
                                   ____

    The Midland difficulties are the subject of much conversation in Oswego, and its indebtedness to individuals and firms in this city s estimated at from $100,000 to $125,000. Two or three firms are creditors to considerable amounts, and there are numerous small debts. The men employed by the road, who quit previous to this week, were paid off, but those at work are in arrears about three months. They are continuing at work and will probably be paid after a while. Indeed there is no apparent change about the shops or offices here:
  As to the Midland securities, the Utica Herald says:
    It is very improbable that any investors in Midland securities other than the first mortgage bondholders will receive any returns on their investments. Assuming the worst to be true, and the facts at present known show the road to be bankrupt, the stockholders will not receive a single cent.
    The towns which have bonded in aid of the Midland and its numerous branches will have to stand the loss, paying interest on, and the principal of the bonds at maturity. The county of Chenango loses heavily. Every town in the county except two. Coventry and German, is bonded. The total bonded indebtedness of the county is $2,085,990, of which the most was incurred in aid of the Midland.
    The town of Norwich is bonded for $371,000, and the village of Norwich for $77,000, incurred to secure the location of the Midland shops at that place. In Delaware county a large number of towns are bonded to aid this road, some to the extent of 50 percent of their assessed valuation.
    In Madison county, the town of DeRuyter is bonded for $103,000 and the village for $20,000. The village of Oneida is bonded for $40,000. Other towns are of Madison county are bonded in aid of the Midland. Oswego city has given $1,100,000 in bonds in aid of railroads, a large portion of which stand to the credit of the Midland.
The towns of Oswego county through which the Midland passes are heavily bonded. In Oneida county, the town of Vienna is bonded for $68,500 for the same purpose.
    The principal of these bonds becomes due from 1888 to 1894. From present appearance the principal of the bonds will have to be paid a maturity by the towns and villages issuing them. The bonds represent the indebtedness. The road and benefits derived therefrom in transportation, a more expeditious way of reaching maker, and to most of the towns and villages bonded a way out, are the credit side.
    Notwithstanding the credits, the inability of the Midland to meet pledges made when the bonds were issued, and take care of them at maturity, will fall heavily on many of the towns which bonded to secure the road.
    The New York Tribune has the following concerning the road’s finances:

 For considerable time past, the New York and Oswego Midland Railroad has been constantly out of funds. About three months since contractors, labors, and others became clamorous for their pay, and thee was a change in the Board of Directors. DeWitt C. Littlejohn, who was then President, and a number of other directors resigned, in order that new capitalists might come in and build the remained of the road. The new officers were to form a syndicate, and take at least $4 million of the bonds of the Company, the proceeds from the sale of which were to be applied to construction. This sum was officially reported to have been subscribed, and it was announced the work would continue. 
    Geoge Opdyke was elected President, and B. Schlesinger, Treasurer. For a time the work went along smoothly, but it is now announced that the Company is again short of funds. It is stated that the bonds were to be taken in installments. Some of the subscribers have not yet paid up their subscriptions, and about three weeks since the Company went to protest.
     Application to the members of the firm of George Opdyke & Co. elicited the information that their house was not affected by the troubles of the Midland Railroad. This corporation was suffering from the suspicion cast upon new corporations, and the great stringency of the money market.
    George Opdyke has indorsed some of the construction paper as “President” but it was only a small amount. The trouble of the Company which now agitated “the street” was of several weeks’ standing, and was used for stock-jobbing purposes and was the rumor about their firm. Nearly all the “paper” in question was held by contractors, equipment and construction companies, and railway supply agencies.
    Later, Mr. Opdyke said that, like all new roads. the NewYork & Oswego Midland railroad had become temporarily embarrassed, but would soon resume its proper position. It was true that $4 million of the bonds had been subscribed for, but all the subscriptions had not been paid, nor had the bonds been sold at par. There was still about 40 percent due. The directors, however, hoped to make arrangements today to insure a removal of the troubles under which the company is laboring.
   It is expected that additional subscriptions will be received from some of the directors who are in the syndicate. Among those who are either directors or have large moneyed interests in the corporation are DeWitt C. Littlejohn, Delos F. Culver, J.W. Merchant, Cortland, N.Y; Abram S. Hewitt John R. Clark, Oxford, N.Y.; Henry E. Bartlett, Walton, N.Y.; Josiah Macy, jr., Albert T.Rand, Henry Whelen, Philadelphia, and Henry R. Low, Middletown.


Madison Observer, Morrisville
Wed., Sept. 24, 1873

    The North Otselic trestle caught fire on Tuesday night, 16th inst., and burnt one of the large upright supports.

Chenango Union
Thurs., Sept. 25, 1873

Serious Accident On The Branch  

   An accident of a serious nature occurred on Thursday night last, which came near proving fatal to Thomas Stack, foreman of the track hands on the Auburn Branch of the Midland. In the evening, Mr. Stack, with his men, came with their hand car to the village, on matters of business.  
   Returning at about ten o'clock, while passing a cattle guard near the new planing mill on Pleasant Street, the feet of Mr. Stack, who was sitting upon the front end of the car, were caught by a plank, throwing him between the rails, the car being propelled by the sturdy arms of five men at the rate of fifteen miles an hour. The length of about two rails was made before the vehicle could be stopped, which it was lifted from the unfortunate "boss", who had been rolled and tumbled beneath in a shocking manner.  
   Stack had been brought against the end of a plank at the road crossing, frightful gashes being cut in the scalp from the eyebrow to the back part of the head. He was also badly bruised in different parts of the body. The wounded man was promptly cared for by Drs. Beecher and Smith, and has so far recovered as to be able to be removed to his home in Plymouth.

Cortland Standard and Journal
October 7, 1873

 Twenty-two regular trains pass Freeville daily, and from six to eight extras. The little "ville" feels quite important as a railroad center.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Nov. 4, 1873

   The Midland train from Scipio, one evening last week, lost the passenger coach this side of Freeville and, though the train besides consisted of but the engine and baggage car, the loss was not discovered for some time. The Ithaca train which was just behind that for Scipio was warned by the red light on the detached car and thus a collision was avoided. The car was pushed ahead of the Ithaca train when matters were righted.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Nov. 18, 1873

   The Midland has taken off the daily train between Norwich and Scipio - leaving only the train on the road which leaves Norwich Monday and returning Tuesday. We have not been able to get the new time table but presume this train runs the same as heretofore - every other day. Only one train weekly runs from here to Scipio - going west Wednesday and returning Thursday.

Auburn Daily Bulletin
Wed., Nov. 19, 1873

   Midland - More Trouble. -   Judge Platt, of Brooklyn, has appointed another Receiver for the Midland - E.H. Pomeroy, of New York. This promises a conflict between the State and the U.S. Courts, Mr. Hewitt, the original appointee, having his authority from the latter Court.  
   The Midland trains from Norwich to Scipio have been abandoned, without advance notice, and travelers have thus been put to the annoyance of finding themselves disappointed in making connections at Freeville and elsewhere.

Auburn Daily Bulletin
Friday, Nov. 21, 1873

    The Midland "Dismantled" - Sharp Practice. -   The Lansing correspondent of an Ithaca paper writes: " The depot agents, on the Midland R.R., in Lansing, it seems, were not quite so sharp as the one at Genoa, in regard to the moving of the furniture from the depots last Sunday morning. The order was, that all furniture should be in readiness for immediate removal. But when the train from Scipio, south, arrived at Genoa, the stove in the depot was red hot; and as it was found rather inconvenient to handle it, it was left. That agent has so much toward his pay, sure."  
    The Midland R.R., in this section, has literally "played out". Last Sunday morning, a train went south, from Scipio, clearing the depots along the line to Freeville, of their furniture. This morning all was still along the line. No screech of the whistle or rattle of cars breaks the solitude; no plumes of steam floating on the frosty air; no more mails; no nothing but the silent track and the deserted depots.

Hamilton Democratic Republican
Nov. 23, 1873

Under the receiver trains are run on the Midland according to the pay received. From Cortland to Scipio one train a week each way; from Norwich to Cortland three days a week each way.  

Cortland Standard
Tues., Nov. 25, 1873

    It is quite evident that the management of the Auburn division of the Midland, as now controlled by the Oswego interest, is based upon a determined purpose to discredit it and bring it into such disrepute as to induce the receiver to abandon it. The ostensible purpose is to cut down expenses to a paying basis. But it does not require much railroad experience to demonstrate the fact that running a train from Norwich one day to Cortland - laying over here 25 hours and returning to Norwich the next day, is not an economical management of the road. It drives away the patronage of the road and saves almost nothing in the running expenses. All the hands, including conductor, engineer, etc., belong in Norwich and would gladly take the train back in order to remain at home over night. The fuel would cost little or nothing more, for fire had to be kept up continually to keep the water hot in the locomotive. The only additional expense would be simply the wear of the machinery and rails. 
    The receipts must be more than doubled by running both ways each day. Already a stage has had to be put on to run between DeRuyter and Cazenovia to accommodate the travel and the mails which the railroad refuses to carry. Besides this, when heavy snows fall and are blown into drifts, the road cannot be kept open with a train running over it one way only each day. Then, to crown the absurd folly of the management of this division, a train is run from here to Scipio once a week!  
    We warn the business men and traveling public that if they do not take measures to be heard before the Receiver, but allow the Oswego management to prevail, the trains will all be withdrawn from this division in less than two months. It is a shameless violation of good faith, and a brazen disregard of the rights of the towns of Truxton, Cuyler, DeRuyter, etc., without whose bonds the road could never have been built, and to whom they are bound in all fairness and decency to give at least a daily train each way. And the best interests of the whole road demand this, and the receiver will make a net income therefrom. The bonding commissioners and supervisors of Truxton and Cuyler and all the business men of this division, should unite in some decided action to protect their rights against his insidious attack of Oswego to destroy and abandon this end of the road. 

Auburn Daily Bulletin
Wed., Nov. 26, 1873

   The Midland. -   It really looks as though the people in the western towns of this county were to be deprived of their newly acquired railroad accommodations. The recent action of the company looks like an abandonment of the line, west from   Freeville. They have already discharged their agents, closed their offices and are running but one train a week each way - going west on Wednesday, to the terminus, in Scipio, and returning on Thursday.  
   Agent Parsons, of the Southern Central, at this station, has been notified not to accept any more freight to be shipped west on that line. This action must also cause serious derangement to the mail facilities, and be the   source of a great inconvenience to the people living along the line of the road in this and Tompkins counties. We regret, for the sake of our neighbors over west that the road cannot be made profitable to the company. -   Moravia Register.

DeRuyter New Era
Nov. 26, 1873

    A movement is on foot to put on a stage for mail service between Cortland and Norwich, and is another indication that is the intention of the Midland to abandon this branch of their road. 

DeRuyter New Era
Nov. 26, 1873
   
    A movement is on foot to put on a stage for mail service between Cortland and Norwich, and is another indication that it is the intention of the Midland to abandon this branch of their road. 

Cazenovia Republican
Nov. 27, 1873

    The DeRuyter New Era utters a vigorous protest against the action of the Midland Railroad in reducing the trains on the Auburn branch to one per day, and produces figures to show that this branch had paid more than doubled its expenses up to the time the trains were taken off. The people of DeRuyter are indignant at this violation of pledges made when the town were bonded.


Cortland Standard
Tues., Dec. 2, 1873

   It is probable that the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira R.R. will after a few days run the Midland R.R. from Scipio to DeRuyter. Superintendent Goodrich goes to New York this week to perfect arrangements already agreed upon. If these negotiations are completed by a written contract, the management will run two trains daily each way. This will be a vast improvement over the present arrangement. The U.I.&E. company ran a train with invited guests from Ithaca to Norwich and back on Sunday, on a tour of inspection - stopping on their way back at DeRuyter for dinner. A lively satisfaction was everywhere manifested at the proposed change. 

Auburn Daily Bulletin
Thurs., Dec. 4, 1873

The Midland, as far as Genoa is concerned, has been extended to Auburn without bonding - the Genoa stage representing the locomotives, palace cars, freight cars, etc., and doing all the traffic of the road between Auburn and Genoa. 

Chenango Union
Thurs., Dec. 4, 1873

   Auburn Branch. -   A special train from the Ithaca and Cortland road came over the Branch from Cortland on Sunday. A large number of gentlemen were passengers among whom were Superintendent Goodrich, of that road, together with several of its Directors, Messrs. Jones of the Cortland Democrat, and Hooker, of the Standard. Their stay in town was very short.  
    It is understood that the managers of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Road are desirous of securing the use of the Midland road west of DeRuyter, and that negotiations to that effect are now going on, with a good prospect of success. Should the arrangement be entered into, daily trains will run between Scipio and DeRuyter, commencing on the 15th inst. ); and in that event it is probable that at least one train a day will run between DeRuyter and this village, connecting with the trains from the west.  
    Superintendent Douglas, of the Midland, had an interview with Superintendent Goodrich, of the U.I.&E. road, on Saturday, in reference to the proposed change; and it is to be hoped the new arrangement will be made, and the road kept open to the public. 

Auburn Daily Bulletin
Monday, Dec. 15, 1873

   The Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad Company have made arrangements with the Midland, to run daily trains over the Scipio branch of the latter road, from Freeville to Scipio, and also to extend the running of their trains beyond Cortland to DeRuyter, on the Midland. This gives Scipio people a chance to receive mails again. 

Cortland Standard
Tues., Dec. 23, 1873

   It does not seem probable that the contemplated lease of the Midland R.R. from Scipio to DeRuyter, by the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira R.R., will be perfected. Receiver Hewitt completed the contract with the U.I.&E.R.R. Co., but the contract had to be ratified by the Court to becoming binding, and there is a doubt about the action of the Court. On the contrary, as the Midland is under contract to carry the mails daily each way from Norwich to Cortland, it is probable that the Court and the Government will compel the road to keep that contract in good faith. 
   The road receives $200 per month for carrying the mails and ought to be made to do it, or else allowed to place the road in charge of those who will. Since the above was in type we learn, that arrangements are perfected by which the U.I.&E. R.R. Co. begin to run the Scipio end to Cortland today. 
 - Timetable -    
Leave Scipio 8:30 a.m., arrive Cortland 11:40 a.m.  
Leave Cortland 8:10 p.m., arrive Scipio at 9:40 p.m.

Chenango Telegraph
January 15, 1874

    Railroad Improvements. - The Midland Railroad are making still further additions to their already commodious works in this village. The latest improvement is the construction of a large building just west and north of the round house, which is now being put up. It is to be 238 get long, and 40 feet wide, with 20-feet posts. and is to be for the present storing steam engines and coaches. Other works are to be put up in the spring, though of just what nature, or their dimensions, we are at present unable to state.

Chenango Union
Thurs., January 29, 1874

    Midland Matters. -   David Shattuck, the well known and popular conductor on the Auburn Branch, has been transferred to the passenger train on the main line, between this village and Oswego. He will make hosts of friends wherever duty calls him.  
    Judson Baldwin is the only conductor on the passenger trains on the Branch. Leaving DeRuyter in the morning, he runs to this village, thence to Cortland and back, and finally returns to DeRuyter in the evening. He is an attentive official, and well liked by the traveling public.  
   The "duplex" ticket humbug is one of the greatest nuisances with which the conductors and passengers on the Midland are afflicted.

Cortland Standard
Tues., March 17, 1874

    Last week was the most blustering of the season, and the roads in some directions were badly drifted. From Monday until Saturday there was no mail between Cortland and Virgil. All the cars came and departed nearly or quite on time save the Midland, which arrived on Tuesday night and did not leave again until Monday morning. On Sunday a snow plow and three locomotives came over the road, breaking a passage for the train on Monday. A little bit of energy on the part of the management could have kept it open all the time and given us trains every day. 

Chenango Union
Thurs., March 19, 1874

    Trains Delayed. -   The storms of last week were unfavorable for railroad travel, particularly on the Midland. Communication with Cortland, via the Auburn Branch, was suspended during most of the week. The train which left this station on Tuesday of last week was detained at Cortland until Monday last. Paymaster Thatcher's car attempted in vain to reach Cortland on Wednesday, and returned on Thursday morning, with five engines. The train due from Oswego on Wednesday evening did not put in an appearance until between three and four o'clock on Friday morning. Profanity among snow-bound travelers was unusually frequent, to say nothing of the railroad employees. 

Madison Courier, Morrisville
Wed., March 11, 1874

    Mr. Littlejohn As a Geographer. - The recent conferring of an honor upon Hon. D.C. Littlejohn gives occasion for the following good hit by the Syracuse Standard, which will be properly appreciated in this region:
    "Hon. D.C. Littllejohn has been elected a fellow of the American Geographical Society of New York. This is a deserved honor. No man in the State knows anything like as much about the geography of Central New York as much as the Hon. D.C. He has canvassed it, surveyed it, stumped it, built a very crooked railroad over it, and finally persuaded the simple natives to mortgage it. Why should't he be elected a fellow?"

DeRuyter New Era
Thursday, March 26, 1874

    On Saturday as the five o’clock train, due from the wast, was rounding a curve near one of the trestles near Quaker Basin, a lady by the name of Herlburt, was discovered crossing, and not having time to each the further side before being overtaken by the engine, she displayed great presence of mind by stepping out on the end piece of timber projecting at the side of the track and quietly letting the train pass by.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, March 27, 1874

    The Midland Railroad has again changed time, and now run but twice a day over the road between Cortland and Norwich, leaving Cortland about 8 a.m. arriving, on its return, about 9 p.m. We do not doubt but the efficient conductor on the train is well satisfied, so far as the reduction of the hours of labor is concerned.

DeRuyter New Era
April 23, 1874

    We understand that the telegraph of the Midland road at this station is in disuse by reason of there being no operator, which speaks will for the enterprise of the compan. Some of the stockholders here who subscribed thereto on condition of repayment in messages, propose to reimburse themselves by capture and possession of the wires and poles.

Cortland Standard
Tues., May 19, 1874

   A new time table on the Midland went into effect on Thursday last, between Cortland and Norwich. It is about as inconvenient as could be well devised, and must still further lessen the passenger traffic on the road. Train leaves Cortland for Norwich at 7 a.m. Arrives at Norwich at 10:15 a.m. Returning leaves Norwich at 5:40 p.m. Arrives at Cortland at 8:55 p.m. The train from the east is generally behind time and does not infrequently reach here until long after the time set down. This arrangement of the trains seems to be made entirely in the interest of Norwich, without the least reference to the interests of the road. 

DeRuyter New Era
May 21, 1874

    Under the new time table of the Midland road, this branch was never so miserably accommodated as now. We can neither go to Syracuse nor come from there by it, without being obliged to stay over night in Cortland. It is the same via Norwich.
    The way-travel is entirely ignored. The people at Truxton, 10 miles from Cortland, can go there at night, arriving just in time to see the stores shut, and return home in the morning, leaving just before they open.
    Norwich is 28 miles from us, Cortland, 20, and Syracuse only 28. If anything were wanting to demonstrate the incompetency of the management, this last arrangement supplies the missing link. Our people will immediately start a stage line between here and Webster’s station near Cazenovia, on the Syracuse and Chenango Valley road, by which we can go to the city, transact business and return the same day. As it now us we can go nowhere and arrive at nothing.

Oneida Dispatch
Friday, May 29, 1874

    An escaped train on this road heavily freighted with wood, started from the summit of Crumb Hill, on Tuesday of last week, and came down to DeRuyter a the rate of sixty miles an hour notwithstanding all the brakes were applied. As it approached the crossing on Utica street no alarm was given by whistle or bell, and Mr. James  Hunt, who happened to be passing at that moment with horse and wagon, came within four inches of being annihilated by the tearing thunderbolt. 
    As it sped past the station, the hands at the depot heard nothing but a whizz and saw a blue streak. they had barely time to say, “what’s that?”  It shot into Cortland county, and went as far as the summit on the Boyce farm ere it stopped. No material damage was done. The hands were engaged in unloading wood when it got loose, and those of them who wee aboard stuck to the flying dragon and “let her went.”  

Cortland Standard
Tues., June 2, 1874

    An escaped train on this road heavily freighted with wood, started from the summit of Crumb Hill, Thursday, May 23rd, and came down to DeRuyter at the rate of sixty miles an hour notwithstanding all the brakes were applied. As it approached the crossing on Utica street no alarm was given by whistle or bell, and James Hunt who happened to be passing at that moment with horse and wagon, came within four inches of being annihilated by the tearing thunderbolt. 
    As it sped past the station, the hands at the depot heard nothing but a whiz and saw a blue streak. They had barely time to say, what's that? It shot into Cortland county, and went as far as the summit of the Boyce farm were it stopped. No material damage was done. The hands were engaged unloading wood, when it got loose, and those of them who were aboard, among whom was R.D. Lewis, stuck to the flying dragon and let her went. But we understand that Dick, nor the others, care to repeat the ride.  -  DeRuyter New Era. 
   Under the new time table of the Midland road, this branch was never so miserably accommodated as now. We can neither go to Syracuse nor come from there by it, without being obliged to stay over night in Cortland. It is the same via Norwich. The way-travel is entirely ignored. The people at Truxton, ten miles from Cortland, can go there at night arriving just in time to see the stores shut, and return home in the morning, leaving just before they open. 
   Norwich is twenty-eight miles from us, Cortland twenty and Syracuse only twenty eight. If anything were wanting to demonstrate the incompetency of the management, this last arrangement supplies the missing link. Our people will immediately start a stage line from here to Webster's Station near Cazenovia, on the Syracuse and Chenango Valley road, by which we can to to the city, transact business and return the same day. As it is now we can go no where and arrive at Nothing. -  DeRuyter New Era. 

Chenango Telegraph
Thurs., July 23, 1874

 There were, by actual count, twenty-six teams in Norwich, Monday, from Truxton and DeRuyter, conveying one or more persons each, all of whom would have come by the Midland road, were the trains on that road run to suit the convenience of the public. By the present timetable the trains arrive in Norwich at nine o'clock in the evening and returns at 7 o'clock the next morning. Since the timetable went into effect, the receipts for tickets, at the Truxton office alone, have fallen off $140 per month. 

Chenango Union
Thurs., Sept. 3, 1874

  Off the Track. -   A wood train was backing down the track on the Branch, on Thursday afternoon last, and when about two miles above Beaver Meadow, it ran over a cow, which doubled the train up, throwing twelve cars loaded with wood down the embankment. No one was seriously injured, but the cow was demolished, a number of cars badly broken, and travel suspended upon the road for several hours. 

Cortland Standard
Oct. 6, 1874
   The Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad Co. has made arrangements to run the Midland from Cortland to DeRuyter, giving the public two trains daily each way. Yesterday the first train was run, taking from Ithaca, Cortland and other places, a large number of invited guests.
   This arrangement meets the approbation of the entire public and will afford the utmost satisfaction to residents along the line. The managers of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira R.R. have been very successful, and they will bring the same judgment to bear in running this addition to the line. The new timetable of the U.I.&E. R.R. will be found on this page, and the residents of Truxton and Cuyler can see for themselves how the trains are run.

DeRuyter New Era
Oct. 8, 1874

    The Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad Company has leased this branch of the Midland Railroad from DeRuyter to Cortland, and run two trains each way a day, hereby accommodating the people along this line. This  is a change for the better, and one long desired by our people.  The Midland retains that portion of the road between DeRuyter and Norwich  and runs trains the same as of old, making no connections with the other road. This is after the usual style of their doing business, and we have ceased to expect anything better from them.

Utica, Ithaca & Elmira
       Eastbound
Express - Leave Cortland 8:30 a.m., Truxton 9:05 a.m., Arrive DeRuyter 9:30 a.m.
Mail and Accommodation - Leave Cortland 2:52 p.m., Truxton 3:54 - arrive DeRuyter 4:30 p.m.
      Westbound
Express - Leave DeRuyter 10 a.m., Truxton, 11 a.m, arrive Cortland 11:35 a.m.
Mail and Accommodation - Leave DeRuyter 5 p.m., arrive Truxton 5:35 p.m., D.L.& W. Junction, 6:25 p.m., D.L. & W. Junction 6:25 p.m., and Cortland 6:25 p.m.
        
      Scipio Division
Going south - Leave Scipio Center 6 a.m., Freeville 7:30 a.m, arrive Cortland 8:20 a.m.
Going north - Leave Cortland 7:15 p.m., Freeville 7:50 p.m., arrive Scipio Center 9:20 p.m.

               Midland
             Going East
Leave Cortland at 7 a.m., arrive Norwich 9:55 a.m.
             Going West
Leave Norwich 5:40 a.m. Arrive at Cortland at 8:56 a.m.

Chenango Union
Thurs., Oct. 15, 1874

   Auburn Branch. -   No change is yet made on the Branch, between this village and DeRuyter. While two trains daily run between that place and Ithaca, we have but one on this end of the line, which does not connect with anything. It leaves this station in the evening, and reaches DeRuyter after the last train has left, hours before, for the west.  
   This gives the weary passenger an opportunity to take a night's rest in that village, to pursue his journey on the morning train for Cortland and Ithaca, which leaves about ten o'clock. Coming east, the same state of things exists, our train leaving DeRuyter early in the morning, before the arrival of the train from the west. It is said that a change will soon be made - perhaps within a week - between Norwich and DeRuyter, and that the road will be doubled, to connect on the same day. No one will object. 

Oneida Dispatch
Oct. 16, 1874

   DeRuyter.-  The U.I.& E. has put new life into this place.

Cortland Standard
Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1874

    On Monday last the Midland Railroad commenced running two trains a day from Norwich to DeRuyter and return, making close connections at DeRuyter with the U.I.& E.R.R. At last the Midland is beginning to come to its senses.

Chenango Union
Thurs., Dec. 3, 1874

                 Another Death on the Rail
                         ____
    About half past five o’clock on Friday evening last, Clinton Weed, an employee at the Midland depot in this village, met with an accident that resulted in his death on the following day. He had been sent with a train up the DeRuyter Branch, to Shumway’s planing mill, to deliver a quantity of lumber, which he assisted in unloading.
    On the return of the train, which was backing down towards the main line, he jumped from the car upon which he was standing, for the purpose of running ahead to turn the switch at the junction. Unfortunately he did not get clear of the car, his feet by some means being thrown beneath it, the wheels passing over both legs. His right leg was nearly severed below the knee, while the left one was terribly cut and lacerated between the hip and knee.
    The wounded man was carried to his residence on Adelaide Street, but a short distance from the scene of the accident, and medical assistance called. He was attended by Drs. Beecher, Westcott and Church, who amputated the right leg just below the knee, and dressed the other limb. in hope of saving it. But the shock was too much for the poor fellow, and death put an end to his sufferings at noon on Saturday.
    Deceased was a son of the late Roselle Weed, of East Norwich, where he passed the most of his life, and was well known to many of our younger people. He had been in the employ of the Midland Company for about two years. He was 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and child, who are left in dependent circumstances. His funeral was attended on Tuesday morning.

DeRuyter New Era
Dec. 31, 1874

    Gilbert Taber has received by railroad 3,000 hop-poles, which will be used for polling the hop yard he set out this season.

DeRuyter New Era
January 7, 1875

    The Midland Railroad has paid the taxes assessed against it for school purposes to the various districts in this town, who have assessed the same.

Cortland Standard
Tues., January 15, 1875

(excerpt of a letter by A.W. Ferrin, Editor of the Cattaraugus Republican newspaper) 
  
   The folly of bonding towns to help along railroad speculators is well illustrated by the results of such bonding in this county. Cortland is bonded for $250,000 - $100,000 to aid the Ithaca Railroad, and $150,000 to aid the Cortland and Utica Railroad. The first is completed, and in running condition, but the last is only graded for twelve miles, and will probably never be completed.  
   The bonds have been issued, and after   ( they ) pay-interest for thirty years, the corporation will have to pay the principal, and the only thing it will have to show for this large outlay is a few miles of uncompleted railroad.  
   A branch of the Midland Railroad runs from Cortlandville through the towns of Cuyler and Truxton. For this road Truxton is bonded for $125,000, and Cuyler for $70,000, and although the road is completed, it does not pay running expenses and is of but little value to the towns except as a convenience in getting out and in. Along the whole line of the Midland Railroad much distress prevails on account of the bonding folly, and it will be years before the towns will recover from the painful effects. It is well that the system has been constitutionality abolished.

Chenango Union
Friday, Feb. 5, 1875

   Conductor Baldwin, of the DeRuyter Branch, has frequently since the snow fell, left his passenger coach at the Otselic Station on his way out, rather than draw it through the Crumb Hill drifts -- the few passengers finishing their journey in the postal and express car. One fine morning last week, Jud came down as usual, and was about coupling to the coach when a gentleman informed him that he was the collector of the town, and that he had levied on the coach for unpaid taxes.  
   The coach is still there, but Jud makes his passengers comfortable in the express car, and the trains move as usual. Marshal Tucker took the afternoon train for Otselic and DeRuyter on Tuesday. DeRuyter has levied four boxcars; and Plymouth levied upon a box and platform car, but afterwards released them.

Cortland Standard and Journal
Tuesday, Feb. 9, 1875

    It is said that very many of the piles that support the trestles between DeRuyter and Crumb Hill are so rotten as to be unsafe.
    On Tuesday last Collector Simons sold several flat cars belonging to the Midland railroad for taxes and they were bid off by H.P. Goodrich, Superintendent of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira road.
    The Town Collector of DeRuyter had made a levy on property belonging to the Midland Railroad, consisting of four freight cars and the numerous of the fixtures in and about the depots, which he advertises for sale on Friday, March 5th, at 10 o'clock A.M., to satisfy the tax claim.

Madison Observer, Morrisville
Feb. 10, 1875
                         Midland Tax Troubles.
    The Town Collectors along the line of the Midland Railroad continue to levy on the property of the road, and advertise the same for sale. In some cases these levies are made apparently to annoy the railroad men as much as possible, as in Delhi, where the collector levied on a train of cars just ready to move, turning the passengers out in the snow.
    The DeRuyter collector has levied on a passenger coach and also four box cars. Plymouth levied on a box car and platform car, but afterward released them. New Berlin levied on the engine on their branch road, and business upon that road has ceased.
    So far, no sales of property have taken place. On Wednesday last, Judge Woodruff, of the U.S. Court at New York, upon the application of the receivers, granted an injunction to restrain the tax collectors along the line of the Midland Railroad from enforcing their demands by levy and sale of property of the road, and issued orders to the various respondents to who cause why the injunction prayed for should not be granted, making it returnable on the 27th inst.
    The town taxes in the petition are: - Sidney, $782;  Eaton, $66; Guilford, $3,336; Otselic, $814; DeRuyter, $800.

Chenango Union
Thurs., Feb. 18, 1875

    Snow Blockade. - Conductor Shattuck, of the Midland, who has been snow-bound with his train at Oswego since Wednesday of last week, returned home on Tuesday, via Syracuse. He says it will be some days before railroad communication is opened between Oswego and Oneida, although hundreds of men are shoveling daily. Trains are running between this village and Oneida.
    For some days past trains going east on the Midland  from this place, have run no further than Walton, owing to the drifts beyond the station.
    The DeRuyter branch has been blocked since the 5th inst., and travel suspended. It was rumored on Tuesday that the men employed in shoveling through the Crumb Hill cuts from this direction had at last reached DeRuyter. If this be so, we will soon see the smiling face of Conductor Baldwin among us once more.
    The Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad has been more fortunate, and the trains have usually been nearly on time.

Oneida Dispatch
March 5, 1865

  DeRuyter. -  It is officially announced to the employees that this branch of the Midland, from DeRuyter to Norwich, will be suspended this week. The control of the same, however, having been transferred to the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira road. It is hoped and expected that that company will in a few weeks take possession and, equip and put it in running order from Cortland to Norwich.
    We are gratified to learn that Dr. E.N. Coon, who received such severe hurts by falling through the trestle bridge in this place, while walking on the same, is rapidly recovering. The doctor has concluded not to run the foresail branch of the Midland in the future without appropriate engines and machinery.
    Five passenger cars on the train en roué from Norwich to Cortland on Saturday, were left at this place on expense till Monday reason of the failure of the “Shoo-Fly” to connect at DeRuyter. One old lady residing near Cortland who ventured to take the train without money, through assurances at Norwich that she would certain each her destination without detention the same evening. A kind hearted individual hearing her story and witnessing her distress invited her to his house to remain over Sunday.

Cortland Standard & Journal
March 9, 1875

    There was a change yesterday in the running of trains on the U.I.& E.
 R.R. One train remains over night at DeRuyter - leaves for Cortland at 7:30 a.m., arriving at 9 a.m., continuing west to Scipio, where it arrives at 12:10 - returning immediately, arriving at 8:25 p.m. Train at Ithaca makes early trip to Freeville and return. Leaves Ithaca for Cortland at 8:20 a.m., arriving at Cortland i:30, returning to Ithaca at 11:30 A.M., arriving at Ithaca at 12:40. Afternoon train from Ithaca at 1:30 p.m., arrives at Cortland 2:53. Evening trains are not changed.

Oneida Dispatch
March 12, 1875

    DeRuyter. - An overland tri-weekly mail has been established from Norwich to DeRuyter. The old man, Deacon Elisa B. Crandall, being the contractor and carrier.
    The inhabitants along the line of this branch of the Midland, are pleased to know that he U.I. & E. R.R. Company, have at last acquired the entire batch from Cortland to Norwich, and will commence running the whole length soon. This is on the authority of General Burt, President of the Road, who was here Saturday.

Official Railway Guide
May, 1875, P. 112

                       Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad (May 18, 1875)
                                    Scipio Division
    Mixed train leaves Freeville  7:45 p.m. for West Dryden, 4 miles; Asbury's Road, 7 miles; South Lansing, 10 miles; Nrth Lansing, 14 miles; Genoa, 17 miles,  Venice Centre, 23 miles; Scipio Centre,27 miles, arriving at Scipio Centre 9:45 p.m. Leave Scipio Centre for Freeville 6 a.m., stopping at intermediate stations, arriving at Freeville 7:55 a.m. Distance from Freeville to Scipio Centre, 27 miles
                      Ithaca, Cortland and DeRuyter Division
                        Express train between Ithaca and 
                          Norwich, 68 miles
                              Eastbound
Express    Miles             Leave                             Arrive
  A.M.                                                                      P.M.
7:15            0                  Ithaca                              8:22
7:28            3                  Varna                               8:09
7:42            7                  Etna                                 7:54
7:55            10                Freeville                           7:42
8:04            12                Malloryville                       7:35
8:10            13                McLean                            7:30
8:25            17                South Cortland                 7:19
8:40            20                Cortland                           7:10
8:43            21                DL&W Junction                7:08
9:02            26                East Homer                      6:25
9:20            32                Truxton                             6:07
9:34            36                Cuyler                               5:53
10:00          39                DeRuyter                          5:40
10:44          50                Otselic                              4:54
11:04          54                Beaver Meadow               4:46
11:35          60                Plymouth                          4:19
12:15          68                Norwich                            3:45     

Utica Morning Herald
Saturday, Feb. 13, 1875

              Railway Legislation
                      ______
Utica’s Interest in a Bill Before the Legislature
                      ______
    The following letter from a gentleman who feels a lively interest in the welfare of the Midland, though not written for publication, we feel constrained to print, in connection with the bill referred to. Our readers will see that our correspondent’s construction of the bill is not correct.
                          ____
To the Editor of the Utica Morning Herald:
    Norwich, N.Y., Feb. 11, 1875 - I send to you herewith a copy of a bill now before the Senate, introduce recently by Senator Selkreg, and advanced to the third reading. As it read, the bill, in the name of Utica, attempts to put the knife to the interests of Utica. It has the two-fold object, first, of authorizing the sale of the Midland railroad west of Norwich, and second, of switching the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira railroad from Utica to Canastota.
     The object is obvious. A purchase of the DeRuyter branch of the Midland would enable the purchasers to remove the branch east of DeRuyter and fill with the track two gaps: one near Elmira, the other from DeRuyter to Cazenovia. It would then be no longer a Utica road.
    An authority in the receivers to sell that branch to to one corporation only, as the bill provides, would be entirely unjust. If it be sold by the receivers, it should be sold at public sale, with all persons and corporations as competitors.
    Now a casual look at the map will show that the interest of Utica requires the road to remain a Utica, Ithaca and Elmira road. Already your road is built to Lebanon, two miles south-west of Hamilton village. A very few miles of new road would connect that point with the Auburn branch at North Otselic. Part of this distance is already, occupied by the Syracuse and Chenango Valley road, which, doubtless, might be used. At all events the gap from Lebanon to North Otselic is much shorter than from DeRuyter to Cazenovia. Why not fill that gap and keep the terminus of Utica?
    The bill is evidently being run in the interest of Cazenovia and Canastota.
                           ____
                The Proposed Law.
An act to authorize the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad  Company to extend their road, and for other purposes.
The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows:
    Section 1. The Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company are hereby authorized and empowered to purchase from time to time any portion of the whole part of the New York and Oswego Midland railroad extending northwest from Norwich, known as the “DeRuyter Branch” or “Auburn Branch,” on such terms and for such compensation as may be agreed upon between the receiver or receivers of said New York and Oswego Midland railroad, and the said Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company, and approved by the court appointing said receivers, and said receivers are hereby authorized and empowered to make such sale, and transfer and convey said property to said Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company under the direction and with the approval of said court; and aid sale and transfer under this act shall operate as an amendment and change of the charter of the said New York and Oswego Midland railroad an any portion of said road so transferred shall thereby be released and discharged from all obligations an habitation now existing in any form, or that may hereafter arise against the New York and Oswego Midland railroad corporation, but the franchise rights and the road itself so coveted with all its privileges, road-bed, rights of way, and other rights shall thereby be merged in and become a part of the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira railroad, with all the rights, powers and privileges and subject to all the duties, limitations restrictions and obligations of the said road, and by such purchase and sale said road, and by such purchase and sale said Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company, are made the successors and assigns of the New York and Oswego Midland railroad of the road so purchased.
   2.  The Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company are hereby authorized and empower from time to time, to purchase, lease and operate, in while or in part, any portion or the whole of the Cazenovia, Canastota and DeRuyter railroad, or any other railroad or railroads, or to extend and and construct their own road, for the purpose of securing and operating a continuous line of road from the city of Elmira and from Corning to the Erie canal, and to a junction with the New York Central and Hudson River railroad at such point or points east of, and at the city of Syracuse, as may be convenient for their business connections with said road with aid canal; and said Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company shall have the same rights, powers and privileges, and be subject to the same duties, liabilities and restrictions in constructing, maintaining and operating said road or roads as it has or is use by its charger and amendments thereof, over and upon its own road.
    3. The Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company are hereby authorized and empowered, from time to time, to take, purchase and acquire land and other property as may be convenient and necessary at one or more points on the Erie canal east of Syracuse for the construction, erection and maintenance of trestles, pockets, shuts, transfers, docks and warehouses for the receipt, deliver and storage of coal, limestone, plaster, and other freight to be received from or delivered to said canal, and other parties at said points, with the right to construct tracks upon and along said Erie canal, its basins, branches, feeders or reservoirs, but only on the side opposite the tow-path and not within the prism of said canal, or in any ay to obstruct, interfere with, or hinder the navigation, or use thereof. Provided, however, that all work upon said railroad along said canal, basins or feeders shall be constructed as to the time and manner of doing the work as the canal commissioner in charge shall, in the interest of the State require and direct, and provided further such tracks shall no extended along said canal basins or feeders shall be constructed as to lines and manner of doing the work as the canal commissioner in charge shall, in the interest of the State require and direct, and provide further such tracks shall not extend along said canal banks more than three miles at any one point, and provided further that under the direction and with the approval of the canal commissioner in charge said Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company are hereby authorized to excavate along the said canal, basins outside and parallel to the prism of said canal of such width and depth as may be necessary and convenient to accommodate boats for receiving and delivering freight at said points.
   4. The time for the completion of the construction of the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira railroad, is hereby extended for five years, and all the rights and privileges heretofore granted, are hereby renewed and continued to said road; provided, however, said road shall be fully completed and constructed within said five years from the passage of this act, and provided further that as to all extensions of said road hereby authorized, the same shall be subject to the provisions of chapter one hundred and forty of the laws of eighteen hundred and fifty, and the amendments thereof.
    5. This  act shall take effect immediately. 

Chenango Union
Thurs., Feb. 25, 1875

A train came down the Branch from DeRuyter on Tuesday, and travel on that road, which has been suspended three weeks will now resume - unless blocked by snow.

Cortland Standard
Tues., March 2, 1875

Preposterous Untruth  

   We copy the following ridiculous paragraphs from the Dryden Herald:    "On Friday, as the U.I.& E. train was making its way to DeRuyter, so much snow was encountered that it became necessary to return to Cortland and attach a second engine. The Superintendent had a gang of Irishmen that he desired to take to a certain point on the road, that they might clear the track, and so placed a coal car in front of the forward engine, and loaded his men.   
    "It appears that a few miles east of Cortland there is a long and high trestle about 200 feet in length and 65 feet in height. Just before reaching the trestle a huge snow bank was dashed into, and both engineers put on full steam, and away the train went across the trestle at lightning speed.   
    "The two rear wheels of the car in which the trackmen were loaded, got off the track, and the bumping and jostling and horrified feelings of those men, expecting every moment to be dashed into the abyss below, can be better imagined than described. It seems miraculous that the car passed over so long a stretch of track on two wheels, and no harm resulted. Hereafter this gang of trackmen will walk across trestles."   
    What could have possessed the Herald to publish such a ridiculous untruth as the above, is more than any man can find out. If he had been in the habit of going to sleep just before issuing his paper, we could see how such a preposterous account could have got into his paper. But that a young man of exemplary habits and a common school education, who sees a railroad occasionally, could deliberately write and publish that a coal car placed ahead of an engine to break through snow drifts, is more than ordinary intelligence can understand.  
    The truth is that the snow-plow was placed ahead, as it should have been, then the caboose for the shovelers, then a second engine and a passenger car. The master mechanic and his assistant were alone upon the snow-plow, guiding and managing it. At the place mentioned, two wheels of the snow-plow did go off the track - nothing very wonderful - and the blade of the plow simply dropped flat upon the rails, and in this way the trestle was passed, as it was not safe to stop on it.  
    Everything was done with judgment and discretion and just as it should have been done. That the Superintendent of this road, who has kept his trains running more regularly with less accidents than any road in the State where as much snow and drifts are found as here, should do such a foolish and disgraceful thing as to put a parcel of men into a coal car ahead of a train, and rush them into snow banks, would never have entered the head of any man in his senses - and we ask the Herald to wake up and let us know what it means by such publications? Somebody has grossly imposed upon it.

Madison Observer, Morrisville
Wed., Feb. 10, 1875

                     Midland Tax Troubles
    The Town Collectors along the line of the Midland Railroad continue to levy on the property of the road, and advertise the same for sale. In some cases these levies are made apparently to annoy the railroad men as much as possible, as in Delhi, where the collectors levied on a train of cars just ready to move, turning the passengers out into the snow.
    The DeRuyter collector has levied on a passenger coach and also four box cars. Plymouth levied a box car and a platform car, but afterward released them. New Berlin levied on the engine on their branch road, and business upon that road has ceased. So far, no sales of property have taken place.
    On Wednesday last, Judge Woodruff, of the U.S. Court at New York, upon the application of the receivers, granted an injunction to restrain the the collectors along the line of the Midland Railroad from enforcing their demands by levy and sale of property of the road, and issued orders to the various respondents to show cause why the injunction prayed for should not be granted, making it returnable on the 27th inst.
    The town taxes named in the petition are: - Sidney, $782; Eaton, $660; Guilford, $8,336; Otselic, $814; DeRuyter, $800.
                               ___
    The Bill pending in the Assembly, repealing the act last winter, in relation to taxes upon the Midland Railroad, has been defeated by one majority. - Hamilton Republican.
    And that one majority was by D.G. Wellington, of Hamilton, voting against the bill.

Chenango Union
Thurs., Feb. 11, 1875

   On the DeRuyter Branch, there have been o trains since Friday last, that leaving this station on the afternoon of that day being “snowed in” at DeRuyter. A failure in the supply of coal for the engine was the first cause of the delay, and now the cue are filled with snow. More coal has arrived, and today (Wednesday) the snow—plows are clearing the track, with a prospect of releasing the snow-bound train soon.
    Conductor Shattuck’s train, on the Midland, has for some days been snow-bound at some point beyond Oneida, but will probably come out all right in a day or two.

Cortland Standard
March 2, 1875

    All the regular passenger trains have been withdrawn from the Midland Railroad. “Wild Cats” are operated to run semi-occasionally. The U.I. & E. Co. will continue to run their trains as far as DeRuyter, as heretofore.

Oswego Daily Palladium
Monday, March 8, 1875

        The Midland - The Repealed Law Constitutional.
    In the United States Circuit Court, in the matter of the New York & Oswego Midland railroad, Judge Blatchford decided Saturday, that by the act of 1866, the State made a valid contract not to levy taxes on the New York & Oswego Midland railroad, during the time specified.
    He also says, however, that the act of 1866 must be taken as part of the charter of that road, and that by virtue of the constitution of the State of NewYork, provisions of revised statutes and general railroad law of the State, the power to alter, amend or repeal the charter of the road is vested in the legislature.
    From the premises the Judge draws the conclusion that the act of 1866 being part of the charter of the New York and Oswego Midland railroad, the legislature could alter, amend or repeal in so far as it related to taxes to be levied after its passage, and that, therefore, the act of 1874, repealing the act of 1866, is not unconstitutional and void. Other questions concerning the validity of the taxes and mode of levying them on the road will be argued on Saturday, March 12. In the meantime injunctions restraining tax collectors from selling property of the road already levied upon, and from making any more levies are continued.

Chenango Union
March 15, 1875

    The DeRuyter Branch has been blocked since the 5th inst., and travel suspended. It was rumored on Tuesday that the men employed in shoveling through the Crumb Hill cuts from this direction had at last reached DeRuyter. If this be so, we will soon see the smiling face of Conductor Baldwin among us once more.

Auburn Morning News
March 18, 1875

   The hill climbing engine on the Scipio branch of the Midland, in this county is of sufficient power to draw 101 cars, of 10 tons each, up a grade of one foot in nine, with 130 lbs. of steam. The grade had been mistakenly put at one foot in 100.

Ithaca Journal
March 24, 1875

    DeRuyter, the present terminus of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad, is 40 miles from Ithaca. Here practically commenced the Midland excitement. DeRuyter was the first town to bond for that road and being bonded on the inflated assessment of 1865 makes the town now bonded for $20,000, or about 30 percent of its assessment. In the winter of 1870 some of the DeRuyter people fearing that perhaps that the Midland would not equal their anticipations, called a meeting and urged the friends of the U.I.&E. R.R. to seize this route. Now, were it not for this company in spite of all that DeRuyter has paid out she would be destitute of railroad facilities.  
   The village contains by the last census 605 inhabitants, but the boundaries of the village are much circumscribed to what they ought to be, and DeRuyter really has about 750 inhabitants. It is quite a business center for adjoining towns, and contains a bank, Union school, four churches, six or seven stores, and one of the best hotels in Central New York. The Taber House is not only elegantly furnished throughout, but the table and sleeping apartments of the house are always under the personal superintendence of Mrs. Taber who never leaves anything undone to promote the comfort of her guests.  
    DeRuyter has suffered badly from the Midland failure, but with right management can get to be a place of considerable business. Her citizens still have the railroad fever and show their willingness to turn out and help open the road to Norwich for the U.I.&E. R.R. Co.

Chenango Union
Thurs., March 25, 1875

   Railroads -   A train came down the Branch from DeRuyter on Tuesday, and travel on that road, which has been suspended for the past three weeks, will now be resumed - unless again blocked by snow.  
   Between Oneida and Oswego, on the main line of the Midland, the road is still obstructed by heavy drifts, although large numbers of men have been constantly employed in shoveling and clearing the track, for two weeks past. The present thaw may have a salutary effect in that quarter.

Chenango Union
Thurs., April 8, 1875

    The scream of the locomotive whistle on the Auburn branch of the Midland, on Tuesday afternoon, was music to the ears of those on the line between this village and DeRuyter, to which they have not been accumstomed for a number of weeks past. It was the first train through from the west, under the management of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Company. Trains will now be run as follows.  
    Leave Ithaca at 8:20 a.m.; Cortland 9:30; DeRuyter, 10:37; arrive in Norwich at 12:52 p.m. Returning, leave Norwich at 3:55 p.m.; DeRuyter, 6:00; Cortland, 7:00; arrive in Ithaca at 8:15 p.m.

Cortland Standard
April 14, 1875

    D.C. Littlejohn is said to have bought property in Oswego on which to erect an extensive manufactory of patent paper barrels. We do not wonder at it. The enormous amount of worthless paper on which the Midland Railroad bonds are printed has glutted the market for old paper, and Mr. Littlejohn has a kind of proprietary right in these, and they will keep his manufactory going for years.

Chenango Union
April 15, 1875

    Now that the “Shoo Fly” trains are run through from Ithaca to Norwich on the Auburn Branch, mails are carried upon them as heretofore, and Deacon Crandall’s “occupation’s gone” once more. (Note: he ran a stage line between Norwich and DeRuyter).

Chenango Telegraph
April 22,1875

(Beaver Meadow correspondent)
   Every one is much pleased to have the cars on the Auburn branch running again; for my part, I could scarcely resist the impulse to rush out and cheer the first train.

(The Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.  operated the Sidney (Plains) to Smith's Valley (Randallsville) section of the Midland mainline from March 15, 1875 until only May 15, 1875. This was done during the Midland's shutdown so that the D&HCCo could provide service to it's remote leased UC&B and R&C lines. The D&HCCo had come into possession of the UC&B and the R&C when the Midland defaulted on the lease of the two railroads as the D&HCCo backed the Midland's lease. The D&H controlled both lines until 1942 (UC&B) and 1944 (R&C) when both were sold to the O&W.)

Utica Morning Herald
Friday, May 11, 1875

    It is rumored that the Syracuse and Chenango Valley Railroad Company will soon commence running two trains daily between Syracuse and Norwich via the Midland from Earlville.

Chenango Union
Thurs., May 13, 1875

Important Railroad Meeting
   It is well known that the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company have been negotiating with the Receivers of the Midland with a view of purchasing the DeRuyter and Auburn Branch. A bill to enable the sale has been pending in the Legislature for several weeks. Our citizens have been somewhat exercised in regard to the matter, fearing that if sold, the rails would be taken up and the road abandoned between this place and DeRuyter. With this understanding, the project was universally condemned, and our representatives in the Senate and Assembly instructed to oppose the bill.  
   Understanding this opposition, Mr. Burt, of Boston, the President of the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad, on Saturday evening last visited out place and met quite a large number of our citizens at the Court House, where explained in full the objects of the bill, and argued that the project would be beneficial to all residing on the line of the Branch.  
   He proposed - of they purchased the Road - to take up the rails from DeRuyter to the Otselic trestle, and with them make connection with the Syracuse and Chenango Valley Road at Shed's Corners, and by this with the Central. He was willing to bind the Company to operate the Branch from the trestle to Norwich, but objected to the proposition to insert a clause in the bill compelling the Company to lay the necessary track to connect the Branch with the main line at Shed's Corners. Mr. Burt was very frank in his statements, and while not willing to bind the Company, promised that the people on the line of the Branch should never have cause for regret the transfer of the Branch.  
   He drew a glowing picture of the future of his road, and of the advantage it would be to the public as a competing coal line, now that the D.L.& W. and Delaware and Hudson Companies have consolidated. He received earnest and respectful attention throughout, but failed to convince all our people that it would be to their interest to agree to the project.  
   Some favored the movement, but we think the majority of those present expressed an opinion hostile to it, believing that it would be better to await events, in the hope that the Branch may yet give us a through connection in the west. It is almost certain that the bill will not pass.

Auburn News and Democrat
Thurs., May 20, 1875

                         Midland - Auburn Branch
                                     ___
   The Utica, Ithaca & Elmira R.R. Co., are negotiating with the receivers of the Midland to purchase the DeRuyter and Auburn branch. Norwich has been afraid that if sold, the rails would be taken up and the road abandoned between that place and DeRuyter.
    President Burt, of the U.,I. & E. R.R.Co., met a large  number of Norwich citizens at the Court House, Saturday evening, and stated that the Company proposed to make the project beneficial to all concerned. He proposed - if they purchased the road - to take up the rails from DeRuyter to the Otselic trestle, and with them make connection with the Syracuse & Chenango Valley road, at Shed’s Corners, and by this with the Central. He was willing to bind the Company to operate the Branch from the trestle to Norwich, but objected to the proposition to insert a clause in the bill compelling the Company to connect the main line with the Branch at Shed’s Corners.

Chenango Telegraph
Thurs., June 17, 1875

    Beaver Meadow. - Not long since, as R. Gibson was driving to the station, he stopped near the railroad track for the train to pass, then attempted to cross directly in the rear of the cars, the train suddenly backed, striking the wagon.
    Mrs. Totman (who was with him) with considerable presence of mind, sprang upon the platform of the car; Mr. G. called out brake, which was done; as it happened, they had a fortunate escape, as only the wagon was injured. 

Chenango Union
July 9, 1875

    Odd Fellows' Excursion   -- Canasawacta Lodge, of this village, will make its annual excursion in the latter part of August - the day to be fixed upon hereafter. At their meeting on Monday evening, a Committee was appointed to make the preliminary arrangements, and report upon the place selected, etc., at a future meeting. Several points of interested are suggested - among them Ithaca - and whatever may be the final decision, those who have attended the excursions of the Odd Fellows in former years will rest assured that a pleasant trip is in store for them this season.

Chenango Union
Thurs., Aug. 12, 1875

   A Committee visited Ithaca last week, and made arrangements for the Excursion and Basket Picnic of the members of Canasawacta Lodge of Odd Fellows, of this village, and their friends, which comes off on Thursday of next week, the 19th inst.  
  The special train on the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad will leave Broad Street crossing, in the north part of this village, at seven o'clock A.M. sharp, arriving at Ithaca at eleven o'clock. Upon the arrival of the party at the depot, which is on the Cornell University grounds, the chimes of that institution will be rung, and an opportunity afforded to those desiring it, for a stroll through the various buildings, where there is much to admire. But a few rods from these grounds, through which the company will pass, is the grove at Triphammer Falls, where tables will be in readiness, with a stone, and all the conveniences for preparing the luncheon from the well-laden baskets.  
   Commencing at this point is the pathway through the Gorge, a romantic glen through which the waters of Fall Creek descend, hundreds of feet within a single mile, on their way to the lake level below, while the rocks tower perpendicularly to a great height above, the whole affording a charming scene of romantic beauty and wildness.  
   Those wishing to visit the village or the lake, will find carriages in waiting at the depot, in which they will be conveyed at a moderate additional charge; and a steamer in readiness at the landing will accommodate those desiring a trip upon that beautiful sheet of water, at a small extra charge. An admission fee of ten cents each will be expected from those admitted to the Gorge.  
   From present indications, there will be a large number of excursionists, and the Committee urge upon their friends the propriety of purchasing tickets as early as Monday next, that they may have time to order what extra cars are needed. They desire to make their guests comfortable during the trip, and ask this favor that they may be enabled to do so.  
   Fare for the round trip, from Norwich, $1.50 up to the morning of the 18th after that time, $1.75. The train will stop at all stations between Norwich and Otselic. Fare from Plymouth, $1.50; Lower Beaver Meadow, $1.25; Otselic, $1.25.  
Returning, the train will leave Ithaca at 5:30 P.M., reaching Norwich at 9:30 in the evening. Tickets for sale at Miller's Drug Store, the Ninety-Nine Cent Store, the News Depots, and by the Committee.

Chenango Union
Aug. 14, 1875

   Swindlers Outwitted. -   Our Otselic Centre correspondent, " Hawkeye ,” furnishes us with the following particulars of the operations of a party of traveling swindlers, and how they came out:  
" When Mr. John Quigley, who has been foreman of the section hands on the Auburn Branch near this place, was returning from Norwich, on the evening train last Thursday, one of the party of three suspicious looking fellows, who had been using cards for gambling purposes in the car, showed Quigley how to open a certain tobacco box, which contained a secret catch or spring, evidently designed for swindling.  
   "In a few moments after, another one of the part presented the same box, to all appearance, to Quigley, and offered to bet at the same time, twenty dollars against Quigley's watch, that the (Quigley) could not open the box. Quigley immediately handed his watch to one of them, who was to hold the stakes; but the conductor discovered them, ordered them to cease such work, or he would put them off the car.  
   "At this, the man having the watch jumped off from the car, when it was going at full speed, and Quigley after him, chasing him about two miles into the timber, from where they left the train, which was a little above Plymouth; the other two following right after the first two. But Quigley was too much for the first one, both in the chase and in the squabble to have the watch. The last two, finding that Quigley had regained his watch, pursued him in hot haste for a time, but failed to overhaul him."  
Hawkeye.

Auburn News and Democrat
Thurs., Aug. 26, 1875

     Decision in the Midland Tax Case. - Last night’s dispatches state that in the tax cases against the New York & Oswego Midland railroad, Judge Blatchford yesterday decided that there is no sound principle which the property of a person or corporation in which is placed in the hands of a receiver by a court of justice for the purposes of a suit pending in such court, can be regarded as being thereby rendered exempt from the operation of the tax laws of the government whose jurisdiction such property is situated. That so far as it appears the warrants are regular in their faces, and the tax collectors are acting thereunder in good faith in the discharge of their duty.
    Such being the circumstances the court denies the application for an injunction against the tax collectors.

Cortland Standard
Tues., Aug. 24, 1875

   The Norwich people turned out, on Thursday last, in surprising numbers, to the Odd Fellows' picnic to Ithaca. They went through this village a little before eleven. The whole resources of the U.I.& E. R.R. were required to move them. There were nine cars and there must have been nearly or quite 500 people.   
   The five hundred ladies and gentlemen who went with the Odd Fellows picnic from Norwich to Ithaca, on Thursday last, got a terrible wetting, as they were out in the heaviest shower of the season. Had they been a month in a lake of water, they could not have been more thoroughly soaked.  
   They went home in a sorry plight. At the station here they could not even raise a joke over it. But when they got home and into dry clothes they probably felt better - only there must have been a considerable amount of ladies wear in Norwich which will never get over its limp condition, and will hardly be taken into favor again by the owners.

Chenango Union
Thurs.,  Aug. 26, 1875

Odd Fellows' Excursion to Ithaca
A Large Party and a Wet Time     

   Thursday of last week was the day fixed upon by the Odd Fellows of this village, for their Third Annual Excursion, and Ithaca was the place which they decided to visit. Early on the morning of that day, when the picnickers, with baskets in hand, and umbrellas upraised, approached the Broad Street crossing of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad, it was a question whether " Old Probabilities " had not gone back on them and whether the decidedly moist and unpleasant weather of the previous day was not to be repeated.  
   Promptly at seven o'clock, eight cars left the crossing, with upwards of five hundred excursionists, the train drawn by the mammoth locomotive " Leviathan ", that was constructed for the purpose of climbing the hill at Ithaca, upon the track at some future time to be laid by the Company, from the present terminus of the road on the   (Cornell) University grounds. The heavy clouds in the meantime had slowly disappeared, and sunshine took the place of showers. At the various stations along the line, large additions to the numbers were made, and at Beaver Meadow a platform car, with temporary covering and seats, was attached to the train, and was speedily filled by those who chose that method of conveyance.  
   Notwithstanding the rather crowded condition of the cars, the utmost good feeling prevailed, as the train rushed past village and hamlet, while the waving of hats and handkerchiefs by those on board was cordially answered by the groups who had assembled at various points to witness the passing of the largest excursion train that had ever traveled the road.  
   At half-past eleven the train halted at the Ithaca depot, on the University grounds, where the hundreds of excursionists quickly alighted from the cars, secured their baskets, and proceeded to their respective destinations. A large majority passed through the grounds of the University, which were deservedly admired, to the grove at the head of the Gorge, which had been selected by the Committee, where tables had been prepared for the accommodation of the party; while others obtained conveyances, and visited the village below, and various points of interest; and others still preferred to visit the University buildings, the chimes of which were run as the picnickers passed.  
   The long line of pleasure seekers, laden with baskets containing the many delicacies which had been carefully packed at home, had scarcely taken possession of the grove, when a drenching shower set in, which caused a commotion among those who had assembled among the pines on the border of Fall Creek; and, despite the good humor which prevailed upon its commencement, the party was soon compelled to vacate the woods, while most of the dainties which they had hoped to there enjoy were water soaked and useless. Before they had reached the University buildings, another and more severe shower set in, accompanied with heavy thunder. The nearest houses were eagerly sought for, where every attention was received by those fortunate enough to reach them; while the University buildings were thrown open to the dripping delegation from Norwich. Many procured conveyances to town, where they had opportunities to overhaul their soiled and dilapidated wardrobes.  
   Those who remained upon the hill were courteously shown through the various departments of the University, and enjoyed a rare treat in visiting the library, museum of natural curiosities, and many works of nature and art there exhibited. Among the attractions at the library were the flags won by the Cornell Club, in the recent regatta at Saratoga.  
   About two o'clock the storm ceased, and the sun once more came out with increased brilliancy and warmth. Groups of Norwich people were soon visible in the streets of Ithaca, in carriages and on foot, and all seemed determine to improve what pleasant weather was left to them, in interviewing the town, the Gorge, the Lake, etc. During this time the Comet Base Ball Club, of this village, who had accompanied the party, were engaged in a friendly game with the Athletes of Ithaca, on the old grounds of the latter, near the steamboat landing.  
   The playing was spirited, and the Comets more than held their own until near the close of the game, when, from carelessness or some other cause, the allowed their competitors to win the game. On the ninth inning the game was a tie, and the tenth resulted in favor of the Athletes, on a score of 10 to 11.  
   Half past five was the hour fixed for the departure of the train; and long before that time the cars were well filled, while the sunny side of the coaches displayed a miscellaneous assortment of ladies hats, shawls and table linen, which had been hung from the windows to dry, and the ground was strewn with the damaged and discarded contents of lunch baskets. At the time designated, " All aboard! " was the order, amidst a rush for seats; good byes were said between old and newly formed acquaintances; the Base Ball Clubs cheered each heartily; and the " Leviathan " commenced its labors.  
   It was uphill business for the engine, and progress at the start was slow, the train twice coming to a halt within a few rods of the depot; but it was off at last, in the relief of those who were now thinking of home. When near Freeville Junction, another terrific storm burst upon the party, accompanied by thunder, lightening and hail. Those who occupied the platform car were compelled to vacate their seats, and seek shelter in the other coaches, which were now more than crowded, and through the roofs of some of which the water was dripping upon the heads of their occupants, who, with umbrellas spread, were attempting in vain to keep dry.  
   The storm accompanied the party for many miles. At Cortland the " gondola " was left, there being no further use for it. Before reaching home, the storm had ceased, and the moon shone out clear and pleasant. At 11:30 in the evening the train stopped at Broad Street crossing in this village, and the party dispersed to their homes, well pleased with the excursion -- all but the rain.  
   Financially the trip was a decided success for the Lodge; and while the Committee are grateful to their friends for their attendance, they of course regret with them that the pleasures of the day were marred by the storm. The thanks of all are due to Conductor Judd, who did all in his power for the comfort of the large party under his care, and discharged his duties in a careful and satisfactory manner.

Chenango Union
Thurs., Dec. 16, 1875

   Shocking Accident. -   Thomas Hassett a section hand on the Auburn branch railroad, met with a terrible if not fatal accident at Lower Beaver Meadow, Otselic, on Thursday of last week. While engaged in procuring some saw-dust from the pit under a large circular saw in the steam mill of Milo Miles, and in the act of filling a basket, he by some means stumbled, and the back of his head struck the revolving saw above, which cut a frightful gash completely over the top of his head, and as he fell, followed down the left side of his face, cutting through the bone over his eye next to his nose, tearing his cheek in a fearful manner, breaking his upper jaw, from which several teeth were torn, and cutting into his lower jaw.  
   He was at once conveyed to Mills' hotel, and Dr. Ormsby, of Plymouth, called , who dressed the wounds, and removed a piece of skull from the back of his head, which had been crushed by the teeth of the saw. He was conscious throughout the terrible ordeal, and it is thought his brain is uninjured. At last accounts he was quite comfortable, and hopes are entertained that he will recover. He receives every attention at the hands of the villagers, who vie with each other in their kindly offices.  
   Hassett formerly worked for years in the hammer factory in this village, and is a brother-in-law of William Rath, who is now attending him. His age is about forty five years.



Cortland Democrat
April 14, 1876

   The U.I.&E. R.R. Co. are laying a track from the Midland track to the Syracuse & Binghamton depot, in this place. The track leaves the Midland on the east side of Pendleton street, and bending to the left strikes the D.L.&W. R.R. track, near the shanties south of Port Watson street, and then runs along side the last mention company's track to their depot. 
   This will be a great saving to both roads, and to the public in transferring freight, etc. The track laying is under the supervision of Mr. Patrick Clancy, who thoroughly understands his business, and who has been in the employ of the U.I.&E. R.R. Co. for several years past.

Chenango Union
Thurs., May 4, 1876

Auburn Branch - Midland  
  As previously announced, the Midland managers resumed control of the Auburn Branch on Monday, Supts. Grant and Goodrich, of the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira road, came over the road with two special trains on Sunday, and removed their stock from this and other stations east of Cortland.  
   Conductor Shattuck takes his old place upon the Branch, with DeRuyter as his headquarters. He leaves that station at 7 a.m., arriving in Cortland at 8:15 a.m.; leaves Cortland at 9:35 a.m., arriving in Norwich at 12:45 p.m.; leaves Norwich at 3:15 p.m., reaching Cortland at 6:15 p.m., which station he leaves at 6:50 p.m., arriving in DeRuyter at 8:05 p.m. The only changes made in the time at this station, is the departure of the train fifteen minutes later in the afternoon than before. The U.I.&E. Company run their trains west of Cortland, to connect with the Branch trains.  
   As soon as business will warrant, a special butter, cheese and stock express train will leave Cortland every Wednesday morning, at 5:30 o'clock, arriving at Norwich about nine o'clock, connecting here with the train for New York. This train will take butter, cheese, eggs, and stock for New York for all stations; freight arriving at about six o'clock the following morning.  
   On the main line, Conductor Quick takes Shattuck's place on the mail to Middletown; Jud Baldwin succeeds Quick, on the Walton way; and Foote takes Baldwin's place on the way freight north. No changes as yet in the time table.

Auburn News and Democrat
Thurs., May 4, 1876

    The N.Y. & Oswego Midland R.R. Co. intend to take possession of and run trains on that part of the Auburn branch of their road, running from Norwich to Cortland, on the first of May next. The U.I.& E. Co. will continue to operate that part of the road running from Freeville to Scipio.

Chenango Telegraph
Thurs., May 11, 1876

A 'CIRCUS' ON THE MIDLAND  

A Car  Seized by the Tax Collector at Cuyler - A Midnight Melee -  The Car Rescued and brought in Triumph to Norwich - What will come of it.   
                                                ____
   Last Saturday afternoon and night witnesses a 'scrimmage' upon the Midland's Auburn branch, at Cuyler, which was most amusing and laughable, and withal slightly serious in its consequences. Some little difficulty has been experienced at Cuyler for some time, growing out of the non-payment of the taxes by the Railroad company. Considerable litigation, in a small way, has come out of the matter and so far as we can get at it the real state of the case is as follows: 
   Some time since, the Collector of Cuyler sought to enforce a levy upon the railroad property, but was restrained by injunction from proceeding to extremities, the Company claiming that the amount of the levy for 1874 (still unpaid) had been illegally reassessed against the road. However upon a hearing before Judge Murray at Delhi  ( NY ) , the assessment was declared good. Then the collector sought to enforce his claim, but was met with the new objection that his warrant had expired during the pendency of the assessment question, viz, upon the last day of march, some forty days or more ago. 
   Notwithstanding this, on Saturday last as the afternoon train was on its way to Cortland, preparations were made at Cuyler, to enforce the collection of the Tax by a levy upon some of the cars comprising the train. Conductor Shattuck having a lay off over Sunday, Baggage Master Stebbins was in charge. Approaching Cuyler he saw one or two ladies and gentlemen apparently waiting to take the cars, but no sooner had the train stopped than thirty or forty men rushed from their places of concealment, and by direction of the tax Collector, boarded the train, some of them blocking the wheels of the Mail car, and others uncoupling the only passenger car attached to the train; this accomplished it was blocked up at both ends with ties, plans, rails and whatever material was at hand. 
   Against such odds of course the train hands were powerless, and quietly submitted to any treatment which their captors saw fit to inflict. In a short time, however, all but the passenger car was allowed to proceed to Cortland, and thence back to DeRuyter for its lay up. At Cortland word was at once telegraphed to the superintendent's office in this village, of the state of affairs. A telegraphic parley was at once had with the Collector, who would not even accept the offer of the officers to send a locomotive to draw the car from the track upon the switch. 
   Finding it necessary to see that the track was 'clear', an 'expedition' was fitted out for that purpose, leaving the Midland depot in this village about midnight on Saturday. The force consisted of engine No. 40, and one coach, filled with a number of railroad employees, and some twenty-five or thirty boys, and young men who were on hand for 'fun and a scrimmage' if any such thing was 'up'. 
   Passing up the road a speed of thirty miles an hour soon brought them to DeRuyter about four miles east of Cuyler. Here the engine was turned and placed on the east end of the coach, and the train slowly and cautiously backed towards the scene of action. Coming near the station the train slowed and the steam pressure was reduced a so that the inhabitants of that quiet town might not be unnecessarily disturbed at that unseasonable hour in the morning. 'Pickets' were thrown out, and the switch wad discovered to be all right. 
   It was but a moment's work for the supple engineer to back up to the waiting car, which had in the interview been secured by being drawn upon the switch, and ties fastened upon either end by means of chains and other contrivances best known to the initiated. Approaching within a few feet of the car a bright light flashed upon the scene. Collector Petrie interposed his body and pistol as an obstacle to the further approach of the train. Finding this availed nothing he pointed his pistol to the head of the rear brakeman with the threats to shoot if any further advance was made. He was met with a laugh and a bounce. 
   He did shoot - twice in the air and twice upon the ground. The cars came together with a crash so great that the chains were broken and the coupling secured. Thus commenced the fun. The car was garrisoned by the party in occupation, and the war whoop was sounded in all directions, guns, pistols, etc., were fired, and the people rallied from every point of the compass. Then the 'boys were let out'. 
   Collector Petrie was next seen beating a hasty retreat down an embankment nearby, without being at all particular as to whether he went on his head or heals. A Cuyler man hit a Norwich boy over the head, and all went in to punish each other the most in the shortest time. Finally all was ready, the engineer sounded the whistle, the boys mounted the train, and with two or three good strong pulls, the coveted car was pulled over all obstacles, struck  the track and away it went over the switch, which it had hardly passed, however, before the coupling separated. 
   The engine again backed up, but before the coupling could be made secure another 'circus' was had with the sleepy watchers in the car who had just taken in the situation. It was all to no purpose, however, for in a few minutes the cars were moving along rapidly towards DeRuyter, and the discomfited and vanquished Collector's party only recovered from their astonishment, as they were saluted with fireworks from the smoke stack, and an unearthly scream of victory from the whistle of No. 40, to see the coveted car 'whirling up the valley'. 
   Though the 'army of occupation' used pistols and guns freely, not a shot was fired by the attacking party, indeed it is not known that any of them were armed other than those nature provided them. Arriving at DeRuyter, medical assistance was procured, and the slight wounds the boys received were properly dressed, and then they hied themselves away for Norwich with one more car they they took up, regaling themselves with the liquid and solid refreshments so hastily abandoned by the watchers, and about 4 o'clock A.M., they wheeled into town well pleased with their exploit, and detailed its particulars to those who were interested in knowing how they 'cleared the obstructions from the track'. 
   The serious side of a question always follows the funny side, and so it is in this case. An illegal and unwarranted attachment of a car, has been followed by an irregular re-possession of it, though we believe it was a skirmish on the part of the attacking party without authority from the principal officers of the company. The amount of tax sought to be collected was $1,700, and to avoid further worry the company have spiked the switches at Cuyler, and all trains pass the station at twenty miles per hour speed. Truxton too has had its experience in the same line and it is not even a flag station now, though we believe an arrangement has been perfected by which trains will soon stop there. 
   On Monday, Baggageman Stebbins was arrested at Cortland, five men swearing that he was one of the attacking party, when in fact he knew nothing about it, but was quietly sleeping at DeRuyter all night as many citizens there will be able to testify. Whether he will be released without bail is yet impossible to state, but we presume the officers upon finding out their mistake will say 'go'. The 'circus' has been fairly opened, each side had had a 'victory', and we trust for the benefit of all that the matter will end where is.

Cortland Democrat
May 12, 1876

WAR ON THE MIDLAND  Cuyler Makes a Fight     

   Last Saturday afternoon, as the 6 p.m. passenger train from Norwich, on the Auburn branch of the Midland, arrived at the depot in Cuyler, the passenger coach was boarded by Mr. Wm. Petrie, Collector of taxes for that town, and two or three assistants, and the coupling pin drawn from its place, and the car seized by the Collector for unpaid taxes. Some difficult was experienced in uncoupling the car, as the train was provided with patent brakes and coupling apparatus, but some of the collector's assistants piled ties on the track in front of the coach so that the car could not be moved, and the car was finally abandoned and the officers in charge of the train telegraphed the Superintendent at Norwich for instructions. 
   The train finally came on to Cortland, leaving the coach in charge of Collector Petrie, and returned to DeRuyter the same night. Mr. Petrie ran the coach on the side track, chained it to the rails, and he, together with two or three others, entered the car for the purpose of watching it until morning. 
    At about 2 o'clock in the morning, the occupants of the car were surprised to see an engine with a passenger coach, within a few feet of the one in which they were sitting, and Petrie at once rushed to the brakes, but the train ran against the car, breaking the chains and driving it away from its moorings. Petrie and his assistants called for help, and commenced defending themselves as best they could. 
   The train was loaded with a large party - said to be from Norwich - and a free fight was indulged in. Several persons jumped on the platform of the car where Petrie stood, and assaulted him with clubs and other weapons. In the scuffle Petrie and his assailants fell from the platform to the side of the track, where they continued the fight, Petrie uppermost. The train hands then assaulted Petrie, and he was pretty badly bruised and cut from being knocked and struck over the head with a billet. 
   He finally succeeded in getting possession of the billet, and his assailant managed to slip away from him and get on board, as the train started. Petrie, who was somewhat confused from the terrible beating he had received, ran after him, but did not succeed in catching him. The part that came on the train is variously estimated at from 50 to 100, and were well prepared for a row. Mr. Petrie received two severe cuts on the head, and was otherwise badly bruised and injured. 
   A correspondent of the Binghamton Times, who was with the Midland party, gives the following version of the melee : "...And just here it is well to explain the legal points of the matter as ascertained from E.B. Thomas, Esq., of Norwich, the company's attorney. The warrant on which this seizure was made expired on the 31st day of March last, and was for a reassessment of the taxes of 1874, which were never paid, and also for taxes of 1875. This town assessed the company on only one-third valuation of its property, and fixed the amount of taxes at $25,000. The real amount based on this fractional estimate of value, would be a tax of $75,000 on 5 1/4 miles of road. It is claimed that the assessment of the 1875 taxes was wrong, and that on a writ of certiorari, Judge Murray, of Delhi, declared the assessment invalid. 
   "The advance of the Midland Company upon the force at Cuyler commenced at 12, midnight in the shape of some 60 men, with engine #40, and one coach, from the Norwich station. As the train pulled out, Superintendent of Motive Power Minshull sang out clearly to the engineer, 'Vic, blow no whistle', and as the train moved slowly up on to the Auburn branch, your correspondent viewed Norwich by moonlight from the cab of the locomotive, through the courtesy of M.M. Williams and Engineer Vic Behste. 
   "Passing up by the Canasawacta river, the speed gradually increased to 35 miles an hour, which rolled the train to DeRuyter, four miles east of Cuyler, before 'the boys' were hardly aware of the distance covered. Here the engine was turned and placed on east end of coach, and backed to the field of action. A mile out of Cuyler the speed was reduced; also steam pressure, that escaping steam might not alarm the enemy. Within 20 rods of the switch, which held the coach, the train stopped, and an advanced guard of trackmen were sent out to examine the switch for spiking. Having examined and found all right, Superintendent Brock said, 'back up'. It was done with General Superintendent Mackie and Superintendent of Machinery Minshull on the rear platform, the force in the car being previously instructed not to leave their seats unless called for. 
    "Approaching within a car length of the levied property, a light flashed from its front windows, and Collector Petrie stepped on the platform and, with pistol in hand, said, 'Don't touch this coach; if you do you are dead men.' This did not seem to strike the train men very forcibly, for Brown got up as easy as though in the Norwich yard, and made ready to couple, and 'swing them back', and they came back. At this point the Collector fired four shots, two into the earth and two skyward, and then somebody hit him a stunning blow and seized his pistol, and he being full of grit would not go down. Then somebody hit him again, and at the same time a Cuyler farmer hit the Norwich man on the skull with an iron bolt and cut his scalp open about three quarters of an inch. 
    "He bled profusely. Petrie was thrown into the ditch with a clear fall from the platform, and was mauled and beaten to insensibility. Another railroad man attempted to pull out a tie, was kicked in the side and responded with a blow with a hammer across the side of the head of his assailant, laying him prostrate. One other Cuyler man was struck with effect and one young railroad man lost a coat sleeve, and was struck in the back with a club. Good management was shown by backing from DeRuyter, as both coaches having Miller couplers, the connection could be made instantly. 
    "As the coupling was made, the extreme force with which they came back broke a chain made fast over an axle of the rear truck, and to the track, and the signal to go ahead being obeyed instantly, the force jumped the truck over a tie that had been made fast ahead of it, but not until after three strong pulls at it with the 'taking of slack' and use of sand had been made, and cool, skillful direction by the officers, and, coolest of all, the engineer, who, when they had lost the coach a few rods from the start, backed upon it while the Collector's posse were discharging pistols and attempting to again board the train. The pistols were dried-pea caliber. 
   ”The most laughable point in the whole was a diminutive Cuylerite jumping down from the commencement of the attack and shaking his thumb on his windpipe to give the quaver to his attempted war whoop as a signal, and the response by the two detachments, one in the depot and another behind a wood pile, while the majority of the collector's forces sought the rear door of the car. The bugler joined them, and before the would-be defenders could reach the front the train was passing from view up the hill, and they were saluted by a thousand 'rockets' from the stack of the engine, and 'toot toot,' from the whistle. 
   “The collector received medical treatment at DeRuyter on Sunday, and has engaged the services of Lawyer Miner in that village. Although the Constabulary used pistols freely and immediately on the approach of the train, it is a fact that although probably the advancing force were well armed, not a pistol was drawn. Coolness on the part of the company characterized every movement, and in less time than any one can read this report, they had backed in the switch and were away. Today switches at Truxton and DeRuyter have been disconnected, and the stations ignored by the company. 
Cortland Standard
Tues., May 16, 1876

Cuyler Items
   Cuyler has a railroad which lets passengers on and off any where except at the depot - Leander Stebbins, Express agent on the New York & Oswego Midland R.R., was brought before Justice H. D. Waters, on the 9th of May, charged by William Petrie with assault and battery with intent to kill.  Mr. Petrie alleged that he was assaulted by Stebbins on the morning of May 7th between the hours of two and three while discharging his duty as (tax) collector. An examination was held with and the prisoner committed. On the morning of May 10th he gave bail before Judge Smith for appearance in Court.   
   Benjamin Brown and wife started for Philadelphia May 4th, to be there at the opening of the Centennial Exhibition.   
   H.P. Andrews has moved his cheese factory, and is refitting it throughout. The factory opens May 5th.   
   A piece of the telegraph wire, about 100 feet long, was cut above the Cuyler depot, and carried away on the night of May 9th, stopping all communication east of that place.

Chenango Union
Thurs., May 18, 1876

All Quiet on the Branch 
              ___ 
  As stated in our last, L. Stebbins, a brakeman on the Auburn Branch of the Midland Railroad, who had temporary charge of the train, during the absence of Conductor Shattuck, at the time of the seizure of the coach by the Cuyler authorities, on the afternoon of the 6th inst.  (of this month) , was arrested by Constable Bogardus, of that town, on Tuesday of last week, charged with participating in the re-capture of the coach, and assaulting and wounding Collector Petrie during the melee of Sunday morning. 
  Upon the return of the train from this village, on Tuesday afternoon, it was "slowed up" a short distance east of Cuyler, and Stebbins with the officer stepped off. He was taken before a Cuyler Justice in the evening, when an examination was held, H.C. Miner, Esq., of DeRuyter, appearing for the the town, and L.H. Kern, Esq., of the same place, for Stebbins. 
   Several parties swore positively that Stebbins was the man who struck the Collector, while he claims that he was not present on that occasion. The examination occupied most of the night, and resulted in the prisoner giving bail in the sum of $1,000 for his appearance at the September term of Oyer and Terminer, at Cortland. Conductor Shattuck and Gilbert Taber, of DeRuyter, became his bondsmen. 
   The trains still continue to pass Cuyler station without stopping, but they now halt at Truxton, which they skipped for a few trips, threats having been made that an experience similar to that at Cuyler awaited the trains at that station. 
   On Tuesday of this week, the Supervisor of Cuyler, with another citizen of that town, took the train at Truxton, and came to this village, for the purpose of interviewing Superintendent Lanpher, and inducing him to cause the trains to stop at Cuyler; but the Superintendent being absent, they returned without accomplishing anything.

Cortland Democrat
Friday, May 19, 1876

More About the Midland War       

Cuyler, May 15th, 1876   
   Mr. Editor: -  Will you allow the good people of Cuyler (and their name is legion) space in your paper to answer an article that appeared in the Binghamton Daily Times, of May 9th, in relation to the article on the Midland war in Cuyler, that has gone the rounds of the newspaper press, leaving the impression that the people of Cuyler are either knaves or fools.
   The statement by the Norwich correspondent is given without the least regard to the truth. The history of this disturbance is simply this. The town of Cuyler, through the influence of the Midland sharpers, bonded for $64,000 to aid in the construction of the road through our town, and by contract we were to have as good a Depot and appurtenences as any other town on this branch. An amount ample sufficient to build the road through our town, where nature has almost made the way.   
   The road was run without taxation until the year 1874, when the assessors pursuant to Statute assessed it at $5,000 per mile, which made the Midland officials (whose pockets would be affected) groan, yet they did not pay enough attention to our assessors to come in the usual way (after being notified) and state their grievances and have mistakes corrected, but in reply to our polite note the receiver, Mr. Abram S. Hewitt, stated that if we assessed the road, the rolling stock would be taken out of the State and we could collect the tax if we could. Please allow me to state here, that the amount of assessment is no higher than many of the towns on the road, and but a little more than one-third of the amount paid for the road by our town.   
   The tax was legally levied, as the United States court, Judge Blatchford, decided, and also in the Supreme Court by Judge Murray, and now that the Courts have decided that the tax is legal, and the injunction is removed which the Midland officials have heretofore relied on. They see no other way to prevent the collection of the tax only by resort to mob law which they have so notably commenced by their cowardly, murderous, attack on our Collector, than whom no more gentlemanly, noble, fearless, or energetic officer ever held the process of law, and the Norwich correspondent of the Binghamton Times, when he states that Mr. Petrie's warrant had expired, either showed his ignorance or was guilty of deliberate falsehood, as can be shown by reference to section 23rd, Chapter 12 of the first part of the Revised Statutes. In making the levy Mr. Petrie had only three gentleman to assist him. The train was standing in front of the Depot, and the levy was made on the passenger car at the rear of the train. A slight resistance was made by the train hands, but the car was run on the side track not interfering with the procedure of the train in the least.   
    It is claimed by the railroad officials that the train was a mail train. We claim and know that it was not. The company have a contract with the Government to convey the mails over the road twice a day, once each way; but for the purpose of defrauding this and our sister town (Truxton) of our just dues, they carry a mail bag on each train, showing how small a hole a large amount of rascality will try and crawl through.   
   Now please allow me give a plain, unvarnished statement of the course persuaded by our collector, Mr. Wm. Petrie, also of Gen. Superintendent, Mr. Mackie. On the evening of the day of levy, Mr. Petrie, accompanied by four others, took position in the captured coach for the purpose of protecting it from harm, little dreaming that a force of from 80 to 100 persons were to make a descent on them. About two oπclock in the morning, the train bearing Gen. Sup't Mackie and his minions, filled with - not whisky - O, no, probably valor - stole gently into town, like thieves in the night, unlocked and changed the switch, sending the marauding train against the captured coach with a force sufficient to break two chains and one cable.   
   On the striking of the cars, Mr. Petrie stepped to the platform of the coach and forbade their taking the coach, when he was attacked by four persons, who, after some exertion, succeeded in getting him on the ground amid the cries, - from those on the bank, (Sup't Mackie and Sup't Minshull) being among the number - of  'shoot him! Kill the G-d d---n son of a b----h! G-d d--n him! Kill him!'   ( sic )  and other expressions of like nature.   
    That Mr. Petrie was beaten to insensibility is a gross falsehood as he succeeded in taking a billy loaded with lead from one of his assailants, after receiving three wounds on the head. The Norwich man that received the blow on the head, got it from one of his party through mistake, as the Cuyler party showed no weapons of defense, whereas, Gen. Sup't Mackie's party were armed with bolts, hatchets, pistols, and clubs.   
   In carefully looking over the Norwich correspondent's statements, we see nothing but a claim of falsehoods. One truth I will give him credit for, that is, when he writes that 'the end is not yet'. The chivalry-lad is correct there. Not content with their attack on our defenseless party, and taking the car, the railroad company set a gang of hands to take up the switch in front of the church, after our people had assembled for worship.   
     A complaint was made to our worthy townsman, H.D. Waters, Esq., who put a quietus to the work instanter. Report reaches us today, that Ge'l Sup't Mackie has resigned, and gone into his hole; hope he won't pull the hole in after him, as there are many on the line of the road that would like to view a man that has stepped from a high official and social position, down to the level he sought on the night of the attack on our defenseless collector.   
Yours very respectfully,  
R. Emmett McGowan       

Cortland Standard
Tues., May 30, 1876

More Midland Trouble       

   As the Friday morning 7 o'clock train was running through Cuyler at full speed it came to a sudden stop, and the passengers were thrown from their seats and piled together in heaps on the bottom of the coach. This sudden change in the position of passengers was the result of a night's work by some persons supposed to have been Cuyler boys. Pieces of rail had been spiked on the inside of the track, and the engine trucks striking these, both engine and tender were thrown from the track. 
   No sooner had the accident taken place than the train was surrounded by men, women and children who had gathered from all points of the compass at the sound of the warning whistle. The bystanders seemed very much delighted at the turn of affairs had taken, and then someone giving the train hands a bit of advice, such as, 'Go to Norwich and get a mob and take the thing away', and many others of a like bearing. 
   Some of the spectators stood with hands in their pockets, others lounged upon the ground, but no one offered any assistance to the poor Midland boys, who with hand spikes, crowbars, rails, and anything with which they could lift were trying to get the iron horse back upon the track. Everything being at last got in readiness, the train resumed its journey down the valley, but a a very slow and cautious rate. Since this event trains move through Cuyler with more moderation, giving travelers ample time to view the country and enjoy the grandeur of the scenery.  Cuyler, May 27th - GAP 

Chenango Telegraph
Thurs., June 1, 1876

A Dastardly Outrage       
         ____
   The Cuyler railroad war has taken a new shape. On Friday last, the engineer on the train from Cortland to this village when nearing Cuyler, saw obstructions upon the track at that place. He at once sounded 'down brakes', and as the train was going but about twelve miles an hour, was able to avoid a serious accident. 
   As it was, the cars were thrown from the track but no damage was done.Conductor David Shattuck at once telegraphed to this village the situation, and a locomotive was dispatched to his assistance. The train was on in its place again and arrived in this village only about two hours late. 
   Immediately upon the trains stopping a large number of Cuyler people made their appearance, with the evident intention of making another levy for taxes, but the wily counsel was around and advised them better, so they did not interfere. This sort of revenge is commonly only in savage countries and ought not to be indulged in by Cuyler people. 
   The lives of innocent passengers should not be jeopardized because of a fancied wrong from the Company, and we trust the sober second thought will prevent a recurrence of such an attempt. Supt. Lanpher has offered a reward of $100 for the apprehension and conviction of the offenders and in the meantime a good lookout will be kept by the railroad officials that no more accidents befall the train.


                                        The ‘Centennial’ Train
In 1876 most railroads were clamoring to transport what they perceived as hoards of travelers to the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia and the New York & Oswego Midland, although in almost desperate financial straits, also participated in this once in a lifetime event.
At both Middletown and Oswego the Midland converted several coaches into parlor and sleeping cars. Following is an account from the Oswego Palladium of Monday, May 1, 1876 which describes this operation:
A Visit to the Shops in this City
The Amount and Quality of Work Being Done
New Cars for the Centennial.
A visit to the Midland shops in the Second ward will convince our people that the managers of the road are determined not to be behind in furnishing ample and luxurious accommodations for people on the line of the road who desire to go to the Centennial this summer. There is great activity in the shops and the hum of busy machinery and the employment of sixty mechanics show that the road is being prepared for better days.
The managers of the road desirous of doing everything in their power to make a trip to Philadelphia pleasant and cheap have made arrangements to run the Midland cars on the Pennsylvania Central from Jersey City to the Centennial grounds, and realizing the necessity of furnishing lodgings for the people have commenced the remodeling of coaches.
At present there are five coaches, two at Middletown and three here, being converted into elegant drawing-room and sleeping cars, and others will be changed as the necessities may require. The three here undergoing the change will be named Philadelphia, New York and Oswego, while those at Middletown will be named Oneida and Norwich. All that will be left on the old coaches will be the outside shell, the interior, of necessity, being new, while new trucks and platforms will be supplied.
The coaches will have the new Westinghouse air brake, a new thing in this portion of the State, which is entirely under the control of the engineer. The interior of the coaches will be finished with black walnut, the floors carpeted with heavy Brussels, and will be furnished with the new adjustable folding chair, which can be changed in an instant to four different styles, including a bed. The chairs, which are of the Turkish easy pattern, are models of beauty, upholstered in the latest style and covered with the best quality plush.
In the rear of each car will be a private sleeping room for ladies and children, with wash rooms off, and at the forward end will be a large dressing and smoking room for gentlemen, with all the modern conveniences. Each coach will be furnished with a refrigerator for storing provisions and a heating apparatus for tea and coffee. There will be adjustable tables and a full supply of table and bed linen so that changes can be made each day.
A competent porter will be in each car and nothing will be left undone to conduce to the comfort of passengers. The cars will each accommodate twenty-five persons night and day, and will be chartered to a limited number at fixed rates per day in addition to the fare. On arrival in Philadelphia the cars will be placed in the storage grounds at the entrance of the Centennial grounds and will remain there as long as the chartering party may wish.
A moment's reflection will convince one that no better place can be devised for lodging, and lodging is a thing that there will be a great demand for in Philadelphia. Tired and fatigued after a ramble through the Centennial grounds, all one who is a patron of the Midland has to do is to go to his car and woe Morpheus and seek repose.
At present two locomotives, numbers 42 and 26, are on the stocks in the shops and are being thoroughly rebuilt, while coach number 29 is ready to go to the middle division. Last week coach number 28, refitted, remodeled, repainted and in complete repair, was sent to the middle division and will be run on the fast line from Oneida to New York.
The coaches now being turned out of the shops are painted on the exterior a bright straw color and beautifully ornamented, while the interior is painted in elegant taste and relieved by handsome sketches of points of interest along the line. During the past three weeks three locomotives thoroughly rebuilt have been sent from the shops.
Mr. E. Minshull, who has charge of the work here, is a thorough mechanic, as his work fully attests.

Cortland Standard
Thursday, June 1, 1876

    The Midland Excursion Car.
                 ____
    The first of the elegant cars built by the Midland railroad company exclusively for excursions, arrived at their depot in this village on Monday evening and  remained for inspection through Tuesday. It was visited by a large number of our citizens, and all pronounced it the best planned car for the purpose, they had even seen.
    At one end is a smoking room and saloon for gentlemen, at the other end a spacious dressing room for ladies. The center  is fitted up with true elegance, without being gaudy. The chairs, as first viewed present the appearances of elegant Turkish chairs, but on further examination it will be seen that they are not only chairs, but at will, may be changed into couches, lounged or beds. The number of these are limited so that but twenty-five are made into beds for sleepers.
    It will accommodate forty day passengers comfortably; but whether more than twenty-five shall be admitted at any time will be optional with the party chartering the car. It will be seen that this limit leaves ample room, and the cars being perfectly ventilated, make them as pleasant as a parlor, with an agreeable select company.
    In addition to this they re provided with cooking apparatus, crockery, glassware, etc., and a large refrigerator for provisions, if passengers wish to furnish themselves. Tables and table linen is also furnished. These cars are to be run as specials, making no stops except for wood and water. They will run directly through Jersey City and connect with the Pennsylvania Railroad, reaching the Centennial grounds about 10:30 P.M.  The hour of leaving Norwich will be about 11 A.M.
    Five cars are finished in this style, and named the Norwich, Oswego, Middletown, New York, and Philadelphia. J.G. Merriman, the special agent of the passenger department, has taken great pains to have these cars so arranged and furnished with every convenience that nothing shall be wasted to make excursionists comfortable and jolly, The price from Norwich, for an excursion of six days, spending four days on the Centennial ground, furnishing everything but provisions, will be $23.25 from Norwich and return.


Chenango Union
Thurs., June 1, 1876

   Thrown from the Track -  The Friday morning train going west from DeRuyter, on the Auburn Branch, was thrown from the track at Cuyler -- the scene of the seizure and recapture of a passenger car, three weeks since -- by a piece of iron which had been placed in a frog near the depot. 
   Conductor David Shattuck with his men succeeded in again placing the train upon the track, after a delay of upwards of two hours, when the journey was resumed without further molestation. Several Cuyler people were visible in the neighborhood of the accident, but no attempt was made to levy upon the Company's property. This was the first stop made at Cuyler since the fracas, and the trains continue to pass that station without halting. The people of Cuyler are not improving their case, in the estimation of the public.

Cortland Democrat
Friday,  June 2, 1876

   Bad Business -  Last Friday morning, as the train came through Cuyler village from Norwich at a lively rate of speed, the engine left the track and bumped along on the ties for some distance. Investigation showed that some person or persons had spiked pieces of rail down on the inside of the frogs of the switch, and the flange of the drivers running on the pieces of rail put the engine off the track. It was some hours before the train was again placed on the track. 
   We understand that it is not known who the guilty parties are. Supt. Lampher has offered a reward of $100 for information that will lead to the detection of the culprits. There is no doubt that the people of Cuyler have grievances against the N.Y. & O. Midland, but no person has a right to endanger the lives of innocent persons who are riding on the cars. The penalty which the law attaches to the crime of placing obstructions on the track is severe.

Cortland Standard
Friday, June 2, 1876

More Midland Trouble       
             ___
  As the Friday morning 7 o'clock train was running through Cuyler at full speed it came to a sudden stop, and the passengers were thrown from their seats and piled together in heaps on the bottom of the coach. This sudden change in the position of passengers was the result of a night's work by some persons supposed to have been Cuyler boys. Pieces of rail had been spiked on the inside of the track, and the engine trucks striking these, both engine and tender were thrown from the track. 
   No sooner had the accident taken place than the train was surrounded by men, women and children who had gathered from all points of the compass at the sound of the warning whistle. The bystanders seemed very much delighted at the turn of affairs had taken, and then someone giving the train hands a bit of advice, such as, 'Go to Norwich and get a mob and take the thing away', and many others of a like bearing. 
   Some of the spectators stood with hands in their pockets, others lounged upon the ground, but no one offered any assistance to the poor Midland boys, who with hand spikes, crowbars, rails, and anything with which they could lift were trying to get the iron horse back upon the track. Everything being at last got in readiness, the train resumed its journey down the valley, but a a very slow and cautious rate. Since this event trains move through Cuyler with more moderation, giving travelers ample time to view the country and enjoy the grandeur of the scenery.  Cuyler, May 27th - GAP 

Chenango Union
Thurs., June 15, 1876

   Centennial Coaches -  Through the courtesy of Superintendent Purdy and General Ticket Agent Wee, of the Midland, a large number of our citizens availed themselves of the opportunity to interview the Centennial coaches "New York" and "Philadelphia", at the depot in this village, on Friday and Saturday. These coaches are fitted up on a liberal scale, with a view to the comfort and convenience of passengers. 
   The main apartment is furnished with the Pittsburg folding chair, elegantly upholstered in crimson plus, which are easily changed to coaches. This apartment is also supplied with movable tables and other conveniences. Toilet rooms for both ladies and gentlemen are admirably arranged, wit all the modern improvements. A large refrigerator, for storing provisions, etc., is an important item in the outfit, and the Company will furnish parties with the use of crockery, glass ware and cutlery, and conviences for cooking, so that nothing is to be provided by excursionists but the provisions, to give them all the comforts of a hotel. As the cars will remain near the grounds during the day in Philadelphia, they will afford a safe and pleasant h ome to parties while thee, as the arrangements for lodging are most complete, and each coach is in charge of a careful and attentive porter. A party of twenty-five can be accommodated in each coach, and the fare for the round trip from Norwich - six days, giving four days in Philadelphia - is $23.50.   

Cortland Standard
Tuesday, June 20, 1876

Midland Centennial Coaches  
            ___
   The Midland R.R. Co. has had constructed some very elegant coaches, with a special view to the accommodation of parties going to the great Exposition. One of these coached was drawn up to the junction on Friday last, and has since been examined by a large number of our town's people.It is designed to accommodate a party of twenty-five persons, ladies and gentlemen, and together with a baggage car, to form a special train for Philadelphia and return. If the requisite sized party can be located the train will leave Cortland at 7:30 a.m. on some Monday morning which can be agreed upon, go to Norwich on the Midland road and thence to Jersey City, and from the latter place to Philadelphia over the Pennsylvania Central, reaching that city at 10:30 or 11 p.m. It will be drawn to the Pennsylvania Depot, not more than 100 yards from the main entrance to the Exhibition grounds, and will remain there till the next Saturday morning, when it will return to Cortland. 
   NOTE: Between Middletown, NY ( the southern end of the NY&OM ) and Jersey City, NJ this train would have used the Middletown, Unionville & Water Gap ( today's Middletown and New Jersey ) to Unionville, NY and the New Jersey Midland ( today's New York, Susquehanna & Western ) to Jersey City, NJ where a connection with the Pennsylvania Railroad's Pennsylvania Central was made.  
    During the week it will serve as a hotel for the party, everything which will be needed being furnished by the Company except provisions, which it is expected that the party will either take with them or buy on the spot. A large refrigerator is provided for the reception of edibles, and in connection with the accommodation in the baggage car, brought to enable the travelers to store on board nearly all the food they would require. The coach is provided with twenty-five adjustable folding chairs which can be converted into luxurious beds or couches. Crockery, glassware, knives, forks, tables, &c., are furnished on the train without charge. At either end of the coach is a state-room, or dressing-room, one for ladies and the other for gentlemen, furnished with every convenience. A porter accompanies each coach to attend to the wants of passengers. 
   The fare to Philadelphia and return, with use of coach while there, will be $26.65 for each person if a party goes on the 26th of June or July, and $23.65 after that time.  A party of two hundred, we understand, is to go from Syracuse, one of one of 150 from Norwich, and one of 50 from Oswego. For convenience, economy and pleasure, the plan seems to be one of the best among the many which have been devised for visiting the Centennial.

Cortland Democrat
Thurs., June 22, 1876

   Wash Out on the Midland -  The heavy rains of last Sunday and Sunday night caused a wash out on the Auburn branch of the Midland, about one mile this side of Otselic on Crumb Hill. The road bed was washed away to the depth of 10 feet for a distance of about 30 feet in length. The abutment of a bridge a little this way was also washed away. Trains were abandoned between DeRuyter and Norwich on Monday. Superintendent Lampher and a large force of men from Norwich arrived on the scene at an early hour Monday morning and the damages were repaired, and trains ran as usual on Tuesday morning.

Chenango Telegraph, Norwich, N.Y., Monday, June 15, 1876

    Heavy Storm Damages the Midland.

    There was a  series of very heavy rain and thunder storms over a large portion of this and one or two adjoining  counties on Friday afternoon and night. The train from Cortland, on Saturday morning was delayed over two hours by damage to the track by floods.  Between DeRuyter and Crumb Hill station, a small stream suddenly became a large one and rushed down with such fury as to fill the small sluice, which had usually been sufficient to carry the water under the track, and the force of the current heaped gravel and even large stones on the track to the depth of a foot or more.
    The stream was entirely diverted from the old channel and ran for twenty or thirty rods by the side of the track before finding a place to cross. The train had to wait for this to be shoveled off. Between Crumb Hill and Otselic, another washout was encountered. Here he track was undermined for fifty feet or more. In some places the bed was washed out to the depth of two feet.
    This occurred at a place where there was no stream but was a flood made by the heavy rain. A gang of hands had this blocked up in about an hour, so that the train passed in safety and the prompt action in repairing damages prevented any interruption of travel.

Auburn Morning News
Saturday, June 24, 1876

 Trouble on the Auburn Branch. - The "Auburn branch" of the Midland is not yet so closely connected this way as to give us the news promptly. So we are indebted to the Cortland Democrat for the following item: "The heavy rains of last Sunday and Sunday night caused a wash-out on the Auburn branch of the Midland, about one mile from Otselic, on Crumb Hill.
    "The road bed was washed away to a depth of ten feet for a distance of thirty feet in length. The abutment of a bridge was also washed away. Trains were abandoned between DeRuyter and Norwich on Monday. Superintendent Lampher and a large force of men from Norwich arrived on the scene at an early hour Monday morning and the damages were repaired, and trains ran as usual on Tuesday morning."

Chenango Telegraph
July 27, 1876

   Change of Time on the Branch
            ___
    On Monday morning last a new timetable went into operation upon the Branch. The train now leaves Cortland at 5:30 a.m. and arrives in this village at 8:25. Returning leaves Norwich at 3 p.m. arriving at Cortland at 6:05 p.m., giving passengers from the western potion of our county about seven hours in Norwich for business, and returning them in ample chore time.
   This change will prove a great convenience, and we hope it will be appreciated by a largely increased passenger traffic. The train east will also carry butter, cheese, stock, eggs, etc., which will connect with the New York train (No. 2) arriving in that city at midnight the same day.

Chenango Telegraph
Nov. 22, 1876
    (Otselic items)
    Our branch railroad has done a lively business this fall, necessitating the use of an extra train considerable of the time. We noticed a train of ten carloads of lumber one day, besides large amounts of coal, lumber, bark, etc., at other times. A work train has been on the road for several days, and considerable many repairs have been made.

Cortland Standard
June 27, 1876

The Midland iron horse, passes our station with seeming disdain and contempt not to  stop.

Cortland Democrat
July 14, 1876

    A disabled engine on the Scipio branch of the U., I. & E.R.R., on the night of the 4th, was the cause of a large number of passengers having to remain all night in the coaches.

Cortland Democrat
Friday, July 23, 1876

    The U., I. & E. R.R., after two days’ trial, have abandoned running trains from Cortland to DeRuyter and back.

Chenango Telegraph
Wednesday, July 26, 1876
  
Change of Time on the Branch 
                ___
   On Monday morning last a new timetable went into operation upon the Branch. The train now leaves Cortland at 5:30 a.m. and arrives in this village at 8:25. Returning leaves Norwich at 3 p.m. arriving at Cortland at 6:05 p.m., giving passengers from the western portion of our county about seven hours in Norwich for business, and returning them in ample chore time. This change will prove a great convenience, and we hope it will be appreciated by a largely increasing passenger traffic. The train east will also carry butter, cheese, stock, eggs, etc., which will connect with the New York train (No. 2) arriving in that city at midnight of the same day. 

 Chenango Union
 Thurs., July 27, 1876

   Auburn Branch. -   In reference to the time table at the head of our local columns   (see below), it will be seen that an important and very desirable change has been made in the running time on the Auburn Branch of the Midland, which took effect Monday last. By the new arrangement, a train leaves Cortland at 5:30 a.m., arriving in Norwich at 8:25 a.m. Returning, leaves this station at 3 p.m., arriving in Cortland at 6:05 p.m. A train also leaves DeRuyter for Cortland at 7:10 a.m., returning to that station at 9:45 p.m. This will prove a great convenience to those residing on the line of the road, as it will give them nearly a day in which to transact their business in town, instead of a couple of hours, as heretofore. Superintendent Lanphere has done the correct thing, and is entitled to the thanks of our citizens, as well as those who have occasion to visit us, for the change.  
   The morning train arrives in Norwich in time to connect with the morning train for New York, and will take butter, cheese, eggs and stock for New York from all stations, freight arriving in New York about midnight same day.  
UI&E Express. -   Leave DeRuyter at 7:10 A.M., arriving in Cortland at 8:15 A.M. Leave Cortland at 8:45 P.M., arriving in DeRuyter at 9:45 P.M.
Auburn Branch Time Table  
Going East  
 Leave Cortland 5:30 A.M.
  " Truxton 6:10
  " DeRuyter 6:39
  " Crumb Hill 6:56
  " Otselic 7:17
  " Beaver Meadow 7:33
  " Lower Beaver Meadow 7:39
  " Ireland's Mills 7:46
  " Plymouth 7:57
  " Frinkville 8:08
 Arrive Norwich 8:25 A.M.
Going West  
 Leave Norwich 3:00 P.M.
  " Frinkville 3:16
  " Plymouth 3:28
  " Ireland's Mills 3:39
  " Lower Beaver Meadow 3:46
  " Beaver Meadow 3:54
  " Otselic 4:14
  " Crumb Hill 4:29
  " DeRuyter 4:50
  " Truxton 5:20
 Arrive Cortland 6:05 P.M.

Cortland Standard
Wed.,  August 2, 1876
  
War on the Midland 
              ___
   An occasional correspondent from Cuyler gives a brief history of the Midland troubles in our columns to-day, and doubtless expresses also the general feeling of that community towards the company. With this feeling there is little question but that the people of the county, so far as they are acquainted with the facts of the case, heartily sympathize. 
   But there is one thing with which no fair-minded man can sympathize, and that is the placing of obstructions upon the track, thereby stopping or throwing off the trains. It is almost a marvel that one one has not been killed or seriously injured. 
   The killing or maiming of passengers who are in no way responsible for the misdeeds of the Company, would be a most inhuman method of bringing the Company to terms, and any proceedings which would tend to produce such a calamity should be sternly frowned upon. We are informed that it was the intention of the U.I.&E. Company to stop the train which they had commenced running at Cuyler after a few days, and if this is the fact, the lawless persons who obstructed the track did themselves as well as the town a great unkindness in forcing the Company to withdraw the train.

Cortland Democrat
Friday, August 18, 1876

On Monday of this week the Superintendent and other officials of the Midland Railroad visited Cuyler for the purpose of settling up the difficulties that have existed between the town and the road. We learn, indirectly, that they offered to pay the taxes against the road and again stop at that station provided the assessors would reduce the assessment from $5,000 to $3,000 per mile. This the assessors refused to do, and thus the the matter rests. We hope that they will come to some understanding, and good feeling and harmony restored between Cuyler and the Midland. -   DeRuyter New Era.  

Cortland Democrat
Friday, Sept. 29, 1876

The New York & Oswego Midland R.R. Co. will run a special train from Cortland and stations on the Auburn branch to Philadelphia, on Monday, October 2nd, to return on the 7th. Fare for the found trip, with lodging included, is $9; without lodging, $6.50. Parties living on the line of the Auburn branch will take the regular morning train, which leaves Cortland at 5:30 a.m., connecting with the special from Norwich, for the Centennial. The train leaves Philadelphia at 7 p.m. Friday evening, and arrives in Norwich in time for passengers to take the regular Saturday afternoon train home. 

Chenango Union
Thurs., Oct. 5, 1876

For the Centennial 
    ___
   The rush for Philadelphia increases as the season approaches its close. On Monday morning the excursion train on the Midland passed over the road. The morning train from Cortland brought two coaches filled with excursionists, sixty of whom were from DeRuyter. About 10 o'clock, the train on the main line from Oswego, numbering nine well filled coaches and a baggage car containing four hundred passengers, arrived at this station, in charge of Conductor David Shattuck, who has been specially detailed to run the train from Oswego to Norwich. 
   Upwards of seventy tickets were sold at this station, and their holders were already seated in their car, upon the arrival of the train. Here two trains were made up - one of six coaches and a baggage car, and the other of six coaches - and they steamed gayly away, the happy party on board bidding the crowd of friends remaining at the depot a cheery good-bye. 
   Six hundred and seventy-five were the number of passengers on the train when it left this village, and Superintendent Lanpher, who was with the party, telegraphed from Moreston in the afternoon, that the trains were on time, and consisted of fifteen coaches, baggage car and smoker, with upwards of eight hundred and fifty passengers, all happy and delighted with the time and accommodations. The excursion cannot but prove a financial success for the Midland, and it promises to be a most pleasant affair for those participating. 
   Six coaches, a smoking and baggage car, left the D.L.&W. depot about twelve o'clock on Monday - the train from Utica being half an hour behind time - and all were crowded with Centennial passengers, thirty or more of whom were from this village. In addition to this, a number of our citizens took the Saturday train on the D.L.&W., for Philadelphia.

DeRuyter New Era
Nov. 9, 1876

    For some time pas the powers that be have been removing the old rails from the main line of the Midland and taking up the iron on this branch and replacing it with those old rails. We call this perfect robbery.

Chenango Telegraph
Wed., Nov. 22, 1876

Otselic -  Our branch railroad has done a lively business this fall, necessitating the use of an extra train considerable of the time. We noticed a train of ten car loads of lumber one day, besides large amounts of coal, lumber, bark, etc., at other times. A work train has been on the road for several days, and considerable many repairs have been made. 

Cortland Democrat
Wed., Dec. 13, 1876

Cuyler -  We have at last a railroad. For the past week cars on the Midland have made four stops every day at Cuyler. The Company have put in a telegraph office and also keep a fire in the depot. They have replaced the switch and done everything up in a business like manner. It makes it very convenient for any one traveling or having any business with the railroad. 

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., January 11, 1877

    The cars had more than their match in the drifts of snow on the railroad track on Monday and Tuesday of this week, and they failed to make time although they done well for the occasion.

  DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., April 5, 1877

   The U.I. & E. R.R. Co., have leased this branch of the Midland railroad between this place and Cortland, and commenced running on Monday morning last, leaving this station at 7:05 a.m., and arriving at 8 a.m. The Midland railroad Co. still occupy the road; leaving Cortland at 6:40 a.m., DeRuyter 8:30. arriving at Norwich 11:30 a.m. Returning leaves Norwich 1:30 p.m., DeRuyter 4:21, arriving at Cortland 6 p.m.

DeRuyter New Era
May 3, 1877

    The Midland Railroad has employed about fifty Indians to work as track hands. The N.Y. & O.Midland Railroad are hauling heavy trains of freight over this branch of the road.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph 
Wed., May 23, 1877

    Conductor Dave Shattuck of the Auburn Branch viewed his native heath with complacency on Tuesday forenoon, because the powers that be, brought the train to Norwich several hours in advance of time to forward cheese on the morning mail. "One man's meat is another's poison." The poison portion refers to the trainmen who handled that three carloads of cheese and butter. 
    Every tub weighs sixty pounds and with three or four stalwart farmers passing it up to the storing of it became - well monotonous to say the least. This opinion is expressed after due experiment. 

DeRuyter New Era
May 24, 1877

             Midland Railroad Time Table
                          ___
                   AUBURN BRANCH.
    Leave Norwich 1:30 P.M., Frinkviille 1:48, Plymouth, 2:03, Ireland's Mills 2:18, Lower Beaver Meadow 2:27, Beaver Meadow 2:35, Otselic 3:07, Crumb Hill 3:36, Wibert's 3:51, DeRuyter 4:21, Cuyler 4:41, Crain's Mills, 4:52, Truxton 5:08, East Homer 5:30, East River 5:37, Loring's 5:45, D.L.& W. Junction 5:51, arrive at Cortland, 6:00.
    Down Trains. - Leave Cortland 6:45 a.m., D.L.& W. Junction, 6:48,, Loring's 7:02, East River 7:12 ,East Homer, 7:20, Truxton 7:53, Crain's Mills 8:04, Cuyler 8:19 A.M., DeRuyter 8:30, Wibert's 9:09, Crumb Hill 9:23, Otselic 10:01, Beaver Meadow 10:29, Lower Beaver Meadow 10:30, Ireland's Mills 10:41, Plymouth 10:57, Frinkville  11:10, arrive Norwich 11:30 A.M.     

 DeRuyter New Era
May 24, 1877

    The train on the Midland which is advertised to leave DeRuyter at 8:50 o'clock A.M. is turned into a butter and cheese express on Tuesday mornings of each week, and leaves here at 6 o'clock A.M., connecting with the New York express at Norwich, which drives in New York city on Tuesday morning. This will be a great accommodation to the shippers of butter and cheese from this vicinity.

Chenango Union
Thursday, May 31, 1877

New Time Tables  
          _____
   A new time table took effect on the Midland Railroad, on Monday last. On the Auburn Branch, train leaves Norwich at 1:30 P.M., arriving in Cortland at 6 P.M. Returning, leaves Cortland at 7 A.M., arriving in Norwich at 11:20 A.M., except on Tuesday and Thursday, when a Butter, Cheese and Stock Express will leave Cortland at 7 A.M., arriving at Norwich at 4:35 A.M., in time to connect with the train for New York, which reaches its destination the same evening. This arrangement will give those visiting Norwich on those days, five hours and a half in which to transact their business in this village. 
    Auburn Branch -   New time table on May 8th. Butter, Cheese and Stock Express from Cortland, on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. A thorough inspection of trestles and bridges has been made, timber is being distributed along the line, and the structures are to be placed in completed repair. Some forty men are employed in laying the ties which are to become worthless, and fifteen thousand have already been put down this season, while the whole number will increase to thirty five or forty thousand before fall.  
   Conductor Dave Shattuck still runs the trains, and his popularity with the traveling public increases as the years pass by. Genial, courteous and obliging, he makes friends of all who take his train, and his name is a household word on the line. Mr. Shattuck has been for nine years connected with the Midland railroad, and for the past six years has been conductor trains having run over every portion of the road with the exception of the New Berlin Branch. While other conductors have received the "grand bounce", from various causes, he remains at his post, having been on the road longer than any of the conductors now employed upon it.

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., Aug. 23, 1877

    John Bewsher, one of the section men on the Midland railroad at this place, met with a very severe accident on Monday last. he had the misfortune o be struck on the hand by a pick, in the hands of one of the workmen. The pick went clear through the palm of the hand with so much force that it penetrated three quarters of an inch into the handle of the shovel upon the hand of Mr. Bewsher was resting. It did not break any bones but went between them and made only a flesh wound. The wound is very painful but the hand is not considered seriously injured. Mr. B. is under the care of Dr. Truman.

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., Sept. 13, 1877

    The ground was broken on the Cazenovia, Canastota and DeRuyter railroad at this place last week, and the work is being pushed right along under the management of the U.I. & E.R.R. The wages paid are $3 per day for men and teams and $1.00 per day for men. Matters look as if we could be in railroad communication with Cazenovia within a few months.

DeRuyter Weekly Gleamer
Wed., Nov. 30, 1878

    M.E. Tallett of Otselic, shipped another carload from this station last week, purchased at 62 to 65  cents a bushel. He has shipped 2,800 bushels this fall from Cuyler DeRuyter and Otselic.

DeRuyter Weekly Gleaner
Dec. 4, 1878

    It is stated that the U.I. & E. Co.has purchased the depot buildings at this place.

DeRuyter Weekly Gleaner
Wed., Jan. 8, 1879
Common rumor closed the railroad travel over the summit with the close of the year; but the engine creeps the grade as usual, having not probably heard of the report. Long live the railroad is the current desire.

DeRuyter Weekly Gleaner
Wed., January 15, 1879
   
    Trains ceased running on this branch of the Midland on Friday last, "until further orders." An obituary should have marked the demise of this important thoroughfare, but more pressing duties have deferred its preparation.

DeRuyter Weekly Gleaner
Wed., January 22, 1879 
    
    The screech of the locomotive is hushed at the summit - a "setback" near the primitive stagecoach and horseback past. Repudiation or stagnation has blocked the wheels; what next?

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., Oct. 6, 1881

    On Wednesday morning as engine 14 was being turned on the turntable at this station, the table broke down when the engine was part way around, letting the forward trucks run off. The task of getting the engine on the track again was no easy one.

DeRuyter New Era
Nov. 17, 1881 

    The U.I. & E. Company are about to build a new turntable at DeRuyter station. The old one is very unsafe.

DeRuyter New Era
January 5, 1882

    Men were at work last week taking up the iron in the Auburn branch from Crumb Hill east, and still we hear rumors that the line will be put in condition for business in the near future. The prospects for being run again soon are decidedly unfavorable.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph 
 Saturday, June 9, 1877

Railroad Officials "Inspecting" 

   A new small platform car lately constructed in the Midland Machine Shops in Middletown for the use of the bridge department and road master, arrived in Norwich Wednesday evening, after a successful first trip. It is a magnified copy of the common hand car with an upright boiler and engine of small proportions affixed to propel it instead of hand power. The wheels are some larger than those ordinarily used, and of cast rims and hubs, held by a steel tire. 
   A seat capable of accommodating four persons runs across the front end affording a view for inspection of track, bridges, and roadway. It is reported to be a mechanical success and was built of entirely new material, with castings from patterns and drawings all prepared at the expense of the company. 
   They started from Middletown ahead of the mail train and continued so to Walton, after following the train in, making a good run, Master Mechanic Minshull, engineered the machine until entering Norwich station, Purchasing Agent Purdy, in kids and Goodyear raincoat, sensationally assuming the throttle performing the feat of shutting off steam; the ingenious steam brake attached to the car stopped it, General Manager John G. Stevens under that familiar linen hat, and inside a rubber coat, dismounted, the lesser lights following. 
   Then Manager, Mechanic, General Road Master, and Purchasing Agent, in their rubber coats and hand bags, marched to the American Hotel. The trip was an interesting one, one hundred and forty eight and seven-tenths miles on an open car, and the roadway was found to be in excellent condition, the bridges and trestles also. 
   At an early hour Thursday morning the party, minus the Superintendent of the Middle Division, and plus Superintendent Lanpher of the Northern Division, and bridges and buildings started to inspect the road to Oswego.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Wed., June 13, 1877

The Railroad Court 
            ____
   John G. Stevens, General Manager of the Midland Railroad, as a wind up to his tour of inspection, held a court in Oswego in the waiting room of the depot, for the trial of John Minshull, Master Mechanic of the road, the charge being the misappropriation of material and labor; the labor as alleged having been expended in the construction of a house in Oswego for the father of the Master Mechanic, and at his instigation. Some thirty witnesses were examined and able counsel appeared on both sides. The judge, "a most noble one", reserved his decision. The end is not yet. 
              ___
Railroad Depot Burglarized 
   The depot of the U.I.&E. Railroad at Cortland was entered by burglars on Friday night and the ticket cases of both that road and the Auburn Branch of the Midland taken away complete, together with about one dollar and eight cents in money. The thieves first entered the ladies room by forcing open a door then finding that the ticket office door contained a patent lock opening from the outside by key, and inside by only turning the knot, cut a hole through the panel and reached inside easily turning the knob and giving entrance. 
  The cases secured contained only passenger tickets to all points, and these will be perfectly worthless to the burglars. Every one is numbered and registered so that in case any person presents one on a train, detection and of course they cannot be sold by the burglars. There is no clue as yet to the thieves but it is believed that the tickets will eventually lead to their detection and arrest.
    That "Steam Hand Car" 
            ____
   On Friday Supt. Lanpher telegraphed to us from up the road, an invitation to make an excursion on the new steam car constructed for his, and Supervisor Babcock's use. We were a little behind the time appointed and awaited the return of the Chenango Union special which had gone to North Norwich. On its return, Supt. Lanpher escorted our Editor in chief to the post of honor - the revolving backed seat on the front - and Mr. Babcock assisted the local to the engineer's seat and pointed out to him the throttle. 
   His right hand had not forgot its cunning, and with assistance of Richard Reddin, who has charge of the mechanical portion of the car at present, we ran out north, slowly until the straight good track beyond the bridge was reached, then we skimmed along toward North Norwich, at the rate of about twenty-five miles an hour, or more, until the Supt. raised his hand in a manner suggestive of a reduction of speed and a stop. 
   The steam break works like a charm and brought us to a stand quickly. Then turning over the seat and facing Southward we again tried the speeding qualities of the machine to the bridge, the exhaust, the breeze and clatter over the rail joints, almost making us believe that we were running the Ulster County Express, and expected Duffield to pull the bell. The stop was made at the depot as easily and nicely as though a Westinghouse air brake was attached. 
   Then Master Mechanic Williams ran the car to the shops, gave us a tour through them, exhibited the finest model in New York of his new valve motion, and sent us back again by rail to East street. The car is all that it should be, mechanically, and will be of great service in the examination of the road or bridges. It can be run for a dollar a day, much less than would be required to pay men to "pump" a hand car over the road in case of a tour of inspection by officials.

Chenango Union
Thurs., June 14, 1877

   Midland Matters -  On Wednesday evening last, a flat car, something larger than the ordinary hand car, with upright boiler and diminutive engine, arrived at the Norwich station of the Midland Railroad, from Middletown, on its trial trip. Manager John G. Stevens, Master Mechanic Minshull, Superintendent Purdy, and Road Master Burdick, occupied seats upon the platform - a settee, seating four persons, being placed across the front, while those seated in the rear of the engine occupied boxes and tool chests. These officials, with the exception of Superintendent Purdy, who gave place to Superintendent Lanpher, left on Thursday morning for Oswego, returning to this place on Friday afternoon, when members of the press and others availed themselves of the invitation, and enjoyed a lively ride towards North Norwich and back. 
   This car was built at the company's shops in Middletown, and is designed for the use of officials while inspecting the track and bridges. It is said to be a success; can be run forty miles an hour, if necessary; and is a decided improvement upon the old hand car, which requires too much muscle for a lengthy trip like that of last week. 

Cortland Democrat
 June 17, 1877

The U.I.&E. Depot in this place was burglarized last Friday night. The rascals effected an entrance by cutting out a pane of glass from one of the windows. A hole was then cut through one of the panels of the door to the ticket office, and the bolt withdrawn. The ticket case - containing about 2,000 tickets - was carried to a pile of stoned east of the depot, and dumped. They secured one dollar and sixty cents from the money drawer. No clue to the perpetrators. 

 Cortland Standard 
 June 17, 1877
  
Burglary 

    As Mr. W.H. Babcock, the station agent, entered the depot of the U.I.&E. Railroad in this village Saturday morning last, he was surprised to find the door leading from the ladies' waiting-room into his office wide open and his money-drawer rifled of its contents, lying by an open window on the north side of the waiting room, while another window on the opposite side was also up. 
   His visitors had evidently effected their entrance by the north window, for the marks of a chisel which they had attempted to force between the two sashes in order to move the window-catch are plainly distinguishable. Failing in this, they succeeded in reaching the catch by cutting out a pane of glass. 
   Having entered the window and secured their escape by raising the one on the south side, they proceeded to the door of the ticket office and with the chisel tried to force their way to the bolt through the casing. This they could not do, and they then cut through one of the panels of the door a hole large enough for the insertion of a hand and arm. 
   From the inside the boat is easily turned by the fingers. The money drawer was pried open without difficulty. The ticket case was torn from the wall and carried to the shelter of a heap of stones east of the station, where its lid was forced off and a board taken off the back by means of the all-efficient chisel. Nothing of value to the thieves was found in the case, and out of pure spite they "pied" its contents, consisting of about 2,000 tickets - much to the disgust of the railroad men, as they had all to be sorted and replaced, ticket by ticket, in their original order. 
    The larger case of Western tickets, however, was not disturbed, and nothing else seems to have been touched excepting Mr. Babcock's overcoat, which they left upon the floor. The money-drawer contained one dollar and sixty cents in nickels, which was the sole reward the marauders obtained for their trouble. No clue to the identity of the guilty parties has been obtained. The injured door has been sent to Breesport for repairs.

Cortland Standard 
Thursday, June 28, 1877

    The management of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad announced that they have leased for the present season the fine excursion grounds at North Bay, and have fitted them up with every desirable convenience for the accommodation of all who may desire to visit that beautiful and attractive summer resort. 
    North Bay is situated at the extreme north end of Oneida Lake, and the cooling breeze which always prevails, the extensive grounds, the pleasant shades, the fine boating and fishing and easy accessibility by the Midland railroad, together with many other natural advantages, render it one of the most desirable picnic grounds in Central New York.

DeRuyter New Era
Thursday, July 19, 1877

   The steam hand car passed over this branch of the Midland on Monday last. It is a novel car, and must be very handy for the Track Inspectors to visit different sections of the road. They made the time in running from Norwich to DeRuyter in one hour and forty minutes.

Chenango Union 
Friday, Sept. 14, 1877

    Large Excursion -  Early on Thursday morning of last week, there was a rush for the Midland depot. From the west hill, long lines of vehicles of all descriptions, well filled with joyous people, old and young, from McDonough, Preston and other western towns, moved towards the station, reminding one of the mass-meeting processions of years gone by. They had come to join the excursion to North Bay. 
   Five cars from the Auburn Branch came in, with crowds of people from Plymouth, Beaver Meadow, Pitcher, etc. Twelve coaches containing upwards of one thousand excursions, left this station, and another coach was added to the train at North Norwich. At North Bay all enjoyed themselves - as those visiting that pleasant resort are sure to do - and the party arrived home safely in the evening. 
   Financially, also, the excursion was a success, the Committee having upwards of three hundred dollars, after paying expenses, which sum will be divided between the Sabbath Schools of Plymouth. 
  We have been requested by the Committee to publish the following card:   
  At a meeting of the Committee of the Plymouth Excursion, held at the M.E. Church, Plymouth, Saturday evening, September 15th, the following was unanimously adopted: 
   Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are due, and are hereby tendered to C.W. Lanpher,  Superintendent of the Northern Division of the Midland Railroad, for his presence with, and gentlemanly bearing towards us; for the inconvenience to which he cheerfully submitted in furnishing, on short notice, extra coaches for the accommodation of a mass of people we did not expect; and for his untiring efforts to make our trip to North Bay and return as safe and pleasant as the crowded condition of the train would permit. 
   Resolved, That Mr. Lanpher be furnished with a copy of these resolutions, and that they be published in the Chenango Union and Chenango Telegraph. 
J.H. Barnard, Chairman,  
Parker I. Newton, Secretary.  

  Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph 
Saturday, Sept. 15, 1877

Narrow Escape 
         ___
    The excursion to North Bay on Thursday had a narrow escape. It was running at a high rate of speed and when near Eaton it came upon a "flag", which was thrown out by section men at work with a hand car loaded with ties upon the track. The flag was rather near the hand car for comfort and though the engine was reversed promptly and brakes whistled down yet it was impossible to stop the train until the forward engine, which was detached from the train, had collided with and knocked the hand car off the track; the other engine and the train were not stopped until it came up to where the hand car was. No injury was done other than a break up of the headlight of the forward locomotive. Fourteen heavily loaded cars with human freight were in jeopardy but luckily handsomely escaped. It was an "episode" that gave zest to the excursion, which proceeded on its way with a slight delay, returning at seven P.M., having a jolly day of it. 

DeRuyter New Era
Thursday, Sept. 20, 1877

Grand Excursion  
        ___
   There will be an excursion from Truxton, Crain's Mills, Cuyler, DeRuyter, Otselic, Beaver Meadow, Lower Beaver Meadow, Ireland's Mills, Plymouth, and Frinkville, on Tuesday, September 25, 1877, to North Bay and Oneida Community. Music will be furnished by the Otselic Valley Cornet Band. Tickets for round trip, 75 cents from all stations. Children under 12 years of age and under, 35 cents.  
    All are earnestly requested to purchase tickets before the day of the excursion, so there may be cars furnished for all, and also to avoid confusion on that morning. Train will leave Truxton 5:56 a.m., Crain's Mills 6:03, Cuyler 6:13, DeRuyter 6:33, Otselic 7:14, Beaver Meadow 7:34, Lower Beaver meadow 7:39, Ireland's Mills 7:46, Plymouth 8:01, Frinkville, 8:14. Returning, will leave North Bay at 2:30 p.m., spending two hours in Oneida Community.  
   North Bay is situated on the Oneida Lake, a beautiful body of water, and the grounds are nicely fitted up for excursionists. A steamboat will be in readiness to give all an opportunity to take a ride on the lake. Tickets for sale at the above named stations and principal stores at Truxton and DeRuyter two days previous to excursion.  
  These cheap excursions are just what the people need, and here is one to the Oneida Lake, and also to Oneida Community, both in one - which give the people a chance for a long ride - a chance to see fine scenery and to obtain a large amount of recreation for comparatively a very small outlay. Every one who can possibly go, should avail themselves of this chance.

Chenango Union
Thursday, Sept. 27, 1877
   Twelve coaches, well filled, came down the Auburn Branch on Tuesday morning, with a party of excursionists for North Bay. Three coaches were added at this station. Under the judicious management of Superintendent Lampher, the Northern Division of the Midland has become popular with pleasure-seekers.

 DeRuyter New Era
Sept. 27, 1877

             Midland Railroad Time Table
                          ___
                   AUBURN BRANCH.
    Leave Norwich 1:45 P.M., Frinkviille 2:06, Plymouth, 2:21, Ireland's Mills 2:37, Lower Beaver Meadow 2:45, Beaver Meadow 2:52, Otselic 3:17, Crumb Hill 3:43, Wibert's 3:56, DeRuyter 4:20, Cuyler 4:40, Crain's Mills, 4:50, Truxton , 5:04, East Homer 5:27, East River 5:35, Loring's 5:44, D.L.& W. Junction 5:55, arrive at Cortland, 6:00.
    Down Trains. - Leave Cortland 7:00 a.m., D.L.& W. Junction, 7:04, Loring's 7:14, East River 7:21,East Homer, 7:28, Truxton 7:55, Crain's Mills 8:04, Cuyler 8:15, DeRuyter 8:35, Wibert's 8:55, Crumb Hill 9:12, Otselic 9:43, Beaver Meadow 10:09, Lower Beaver Meadow 10:14, Ireland's Mills 10:22, Plymouth 10:38, Frinkville  10:52, arrive Norwich 11:15 A.M.     

Chenango Union
Thurs., Sept. 20, 1877

    Large Excursion - Early on Thursday morning of last week, there was a rush for the Midland depot. From the west hill, long lines of vehicles of all descriptions, well filled with joyous people, old and young, from McDonough, Preston and other western towns, moved towards the station, reminding one of the mass meeting processions of years gone by. They had come to join the excursion from Plymouth to North Bay.
   Five cars from the Auburn branch came in, with crowds of people from Plymouth, Beaver Meadow, Pitcher, etc. Twelve coaches, containing upwards of 1,000 excursionists, left this station, and another crowd was added to the train at North Norwich. At North Bay all enjoyed themselves - and those visiting that pleasant resort are sure to do - and the party arrived home safely in the evening. Financially, also, the excursion was a success, the Committee having upwards of three hundred dollars, after paying expenses, which sum will be divided between the Sabbath Schools of Plymouth.
  At a meeting of the Committee of Plymouth Excursion, held in the M.E. Church, Plymouth, Saturday evening, September 15th, the following was unanimously adopted:
    Resolved, That thanks of this Committee are due, and are hereby tendered to C.W. Lanpher, superintendent of the Northern Division of the Midland Railroad, for his presence with, and gentlemanly bearing toward us; for the inconvenience to which he so cheerfully submitted to furnishing, on short notice, extra coaches for the accommodation of a mass of people we did not expect; and for his untiring efforts to make our trip to North Bay and return as safe and pleasant as the crowded condition of the train would permit. 
    Resolved, That M. Lampher be furnished with a copy of these resolutions, and that they be published in the Chenango Union and Chenango Telegraph.
                                                                                                    J.B. BARNARD, Chairman.
Parker L. Newman, Secretary

(Note: Before the Sylvan Beach resort was developed by James Spencer the Midland had set up its own picnic grounds at North Bay, immediately south of where their depot was situated. This was at the closest point of the railroad to Oneida Lake. The Midland's picnic grounds were immediately abandoned when Spencer's Beach debuted.)
     
DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., Oct. 4, 1877

    In the case of the People vs. Stebbins, which grew out of the riot of the Midland Railroad and Cuyler some time ago, in which it was claimed that Mr. Stebbins assaulted Collector Petrie with intent to kill, and for which an indictment was found before a Cortland County Grand Jury against Mr. Stebbins, in the trial of the same which came off this week at Cortland, the jury returned a verdict of "Not Guilty". L. B. Kern, Esq. of this place, was the principal attorney on the defense.

Cortland Democrat 
Thursday, March 14, 1878

    The Norwich Telegraph gives the following report of the settlement of the difficulty between the town of Cuyler and the Midland railroad, out of which grew the numerous indictments which were nol prosed at the last county court: "The suit of the town of Cuyler against the Midland Railroad employees, and others, for alleged riot, in forcibly taking from the Collector of the town of Cuyler a car of that road, detained by him for non-payment of taxes, has, we learn, just as we go to press, been settled by that town paying the Midland fifty dollars and withdrawing the suit. Now the boys can again breathe free, and smile with their accustomed freedom. As we understand it, the boot is on the other foot. The Midland employees came down to the tune of $200, in order to have the matter dropped."

Syracuse Standard
March 19,1878

    The suit of the town of Cuyler against the Midland railroad employees and others, for alleged riot, in forcibly taking from the Collector of the town of Cuyler a car of that road detained by him for  non-payment of taxes, has been settled by that town paying the Midland road fifty dollars and withdrawing the suit.
    Ed. Baldwin, of DeRuyter, formerly conductor on this branch of the Midland railroad, has accepted a call to be conductor on the Troy & Rensselaer railroad. Jud. is a genial gentleman and was an obliging and popular conductor while on the Midland.

DeRuyter New Era 
Friday, Oct.18, 1878

   On Sunday last, the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad Company, who are building the road between this place and Cazenovia, put in the rails connecting the Canastota, Cazenovia and DeRuyter Railroad with the Midland at this place. This gives the U.I.&E. road the chance to run its cars on to the new road so as to be able to transport material for the road by rail as fast as it is built. The road is graded and the ties laid as far as the crossing of the Tioughnioga River, and the abutments for the bridge are being rapidly pushed forward, it will not be long before the bridge will be up and the cars across. The road bed is graded for nearly four miles north of this place and it will be ready for the iron as soon as the bridge is up. The work on other portions of the road is progressing with all speed toward a successful and early termination.

 Cortland Standard
 Thursday, December 12, 1878

   Theodore Tilton must have been in a condition of anything but 'heart's ease' when he reached Cortland on Tuesday evening last, to deliver his lecture on that subject. The sweeping away of a bridge on the Midland had prevented the running of the regular afternoon train from DeRuyter to Cortland, and had compelled him to make a journey of twelve miles or more on a hand-car in a driving rain. It was after 8:30 when he appeared on the platform at Taylor Hall and began his lecture before a meagre audience. 
    The evening was so stormy, and the uncertainty as to whether the lecturer would arrive was so great, that many persons who had secured reserved seats did not attend, and very few general admission tickets were sold. The lecture was not, as the title might suggest, of the sentimental or romantic order, but practical and suited to the times. It began with a reference to the hard times, which were declared to be making the country 'a rich man's purgatory and a poor man's hell.' 
   How the hard times were to be improved, Mr. Tilton did not undertake today. Almost every one has a different theory. What the nation needs is 'heart's ease' till the times grow better. The functions of the heart in the human frame were described, the labor which it performs and the manner in which it is overtaxed in broken down. Some rather startling facts and figures were given to show how intemperance, violent athletic exercise, and over-work in ordinary business tell upon this important organ. 
    "Hurry, flurry and worry," Mr. Tilton declared are the three sculptors who are chiseling out a typical American face - long, sharp-chinned, flat-cheeked, cadaverous and anxious. America is the country where everything must be done in twenty minutes. To counteract this driving, worrying tendency, he would have the people cultivate a courage or pluck which rises as fortune declines. He would have them strive to attain cheerfulness and content, to cherish those affections which find their fullest development in the home, to acquire that intellectual culture which makes books a source of never-failing consolation, and to cultivate those religious feelings which find their richest nourishment in the Bible and in the Christianity which it teaches, and which can bring peace and happiness in poverty as well as in riches. 
    The relations between labor and capital were also touched upon, and the two events which had done most to destroy confidence and continue hard times were declared to be the Pittsburgh riots and the failure of the Glasgow bank; and the rioters and the bank directors were placed on the same plane of guilt. The lecture was one of deep interest, and was very effectively delivered.    
    NOTE:  According to the Dictionary of American Biography (1936 edition) Vol. 18, Pages 551-553, Theodore Tilton (Oct. 2, 1835 - May 25, 1907) was a well known journalist and reporter for the New York Tribune. One of his regular assignments was to take down in short hand the sermons of Henry Ward Beecher, a noted Brooklyn, NY preacher and brother of author Harriet Beecher Stowe. Tilton's lecture was quite prophetic. Nothing has changed other the names and faces.  
Chenango Union of Norwich, NY - Thursday, December 19, 1878

   Theodore Tilton left this village on Tuesday afternoon of last week, via the Auburn Branch, for Cortland, where he had an engagement to lecture on "Heart's Ease" that evening. When near Truxton the train was stopped by the accumulation of gravel and rubbish washed upon the track by the freshet, and Theodore prevailed upon two laborers to take him to his destination, some twelve miles distant, on a hand car. It was a tedious ride, through rain and flood, and he was compelled at times to relieve his tired companions at the crank. Reaching Cortland at 8 p.m., he appeared on the platform wet, chilled and exhausted, and gave a fine lecture before a meager audience. Without rest he then hastened to Syracuse, to lecture under an order from the Lecture Bureau. Here he failed to find who had engaged him, as the person did not wish to be known, but it is hinted that the engagement was made by a woman.
    NOTE:  According to the Dictionary of American Biography (1936 edition) Vol. 18, Pages 551-553, Theodore Tilton (Oct. 2, 1835 - May 25, 1907) was a well known journalist and reporter for the New York Tribune. One of his regular assignments was to take down in short hand the sermons of Henry Ward Beecher, a noted Brooklyn, NY preacher and brother of author Harriet Beecher Stowe.  

Cortland Democrat
Friday, Dec. 20, 1878

   On and after January 1st, 1879, trains on the Midland R.R., from Cortland to Norwich will be discontinued. The road will be abandoned before that time in the event of a snow blockade.
    It is rumored that the Midland Railroad Company propose to abandon the DeRuyter branch of their road.

From: Rand-McNally Railroad Guide, January, 1879

       Auburn Branch, New York & Oswego Midland

A.M.  (#44)          A.M. (#40 ex. Sunday)        Stations                              P.M.  #41)

4:10                       7:00                                  Cortland                              5:45 
4:13                       7:03                                  D.L.& W. Jct.                       5:42
4:22                       7:12                                  Lorings                                5:32
4:32                       7:24                                  East Homer                         5:25
4:52                       7:50                                  Truxton                                5:00
4:58                       7:56                                  Crain’s Mills                       4:47
5:10                       8:07                                 Cuyler                                   4:39
5:25                       8:30                                 DeRuyter                              4:20
5:48                       9:00                                 Crumb Hill                           3:43
6:15                       9:28                                 Otselic                                   3:20
6:40                       9:51                                 Beaver Meadow                  2:56
7:16                       9:57                      Lower Beaver Meadow                2:50
7:26                     10:08                                 Ireland’s Mills                     2:43
7:36                     10:50                                 Frinkville                             2:10
8:06                     11:15                                 Norwich                              1:45



No. 44, Butter and Cheese Express, leaves Cortland Tuesday and Thursday,
taking the place of the regular train.

                          Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Scipio Division (January 1, 1879)

Leave 9:20 A.M.                     0  Freeville                                 12:57 A.M.
                                              10 South Lansing
                                              14 North Lansing
                                              17 Genoa
                                              23 Venice Center
11 A.M.                                  27 Scipio Center                         11:15 A.M.



Chenango Union
Thursday, January 9, 1879

    Rough Weather -  The storm which prevailed so generally, reaching into the extreme southern stated, was very severe in this section, although we have less snow than has fallen at points north and west of us. Commencing early on Thursday morning, the snow fell at intervals, during the day, accompanied by high winds, which increased to a hurricane in the afternoon. Thursday night was one of the roughest ever experienced by the "oldest inhabitant", the wind howling fearfully, throwing the snow in immense drifts in all directions. 
    Friday morning was bitter cold, the mercury having dropped several degrees below zero, and the storm of wind and snow still raging, which it continued to do throughout the day. Roads were badly blocked with drifts, in some localities more so than at any time within the past twenty years. Railroad travel was checked, particularly north and west of us. 
    The train which left on Thursday afternoon, on the Auburn Branch, reached DeRuyter, where it remained at last accounts; that from Oneida, due on Thursday, reached this station on Monday; between Oneida and Oswego the Midland is blocked; south of here the trains on that road have run quite regularly, as they have also on the D.L.&W. road. We inquired of a neighboring farmer, who has been one of a party engaged in breaking roads on Saturday afternoon, the average depth of snow in his section. "From four to seven feet", was the reply; and that is the "average" generally.

Cazenovia Standard
Wed., January 15, 1879

Notice was given last week that all trains on the Auburn branch of the Midland Railroad would be discontinued on the 13th inst.

Chenango Union
 January 16, 1879

    In consequence of the snow blockade on the Auburn Branch last week, Postmaster Spaulding sent the mails by private conveyance on Wednesday. Will. Graham undertook the job, and was accompanied by H. Hendricks, in charge of a large amount of American Express matter. After much hard work they reached DeRuyter on Wednesday evening, and returned to this place on Thursday.
    The road to DeRuyter was opened on Friday, and on Saturday a long train of cars of all descriptions, collected from the line of the road, reached this station. It was the last train, bringing the moveable property of the road, which is abandoned.
    For the accommodation of the traveling and business public, Simeon Crumb, of Beaver Meadow, has commenced running a Passenger, Freight and Express conveyance between Norwich and South Otselic, arrangements having been made with the American Express Company and with Freight Companies. Passengers and Express matter will be carried each way, daily, arriving from South Otselic at 11 A.M., ill and leaving from the Spaulding House at 2 P.M. Fare each way, $l, and from intermediate stations in proportion. Freight will be run from Norwich on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and from South Otselic on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. James Crandall has charge of the passenger and express conveyance.
    Until a permanent arrangement is made by the Department, for carrying the mails on this route, Will. Graham will deliver them, leaving Norwich on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and returning on the alternate days.

Syracuse Courier
January 22, 1879

    The Auburn branch of the Midland railroad from Norwich has been abandoned on account of the immense snow drifts in Chenango County, for the winter. Stagecoach express and mail lines have been re-established between Norwich and Otselic Valley. The DeRuyter New Era defends the town in attempting to repudiate her Midland bonds, on the ground that the branch between DeRuyter and the village of Norwich has been abandoned, which it claims to be a breach of good faith on the part of the company.

 Chenango Union
 Thurs., February 13, 1879

  Commencing Monday last, J. Crandall's stage runs between this village and Beaver Meadow, instead of South Otselic, as heretofore. This change is made in consequence of the condition of the roads, and the lack of passengers. The stage leaves Beaver Meadow on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 a.m., arriving at Norwich at 10:45; returning, leaves the Spaulding House at 3 p.m. Freight and express matter will be carried through to South Otselic, as previously advertised, by S. Crumb.

Chenango Union
Wed., Oct. 30, 1879

                          Midland Reminiscence
                                       ______
    Now that the Midland is probably to change hands on Friday next, it may not be out of place to remind our readers that ten years have elapsed since the road was opened.
    About the middle of June, 1868, contracts for building the Midland were let, Messrs. Sage & Williams securing that on the Norwich Division, between this village and Sidney Plains. On Tuesday, June 23d, “dirt was flying” all along the line from Oswego to Sidney. On that day ground was broken on the J.R. Wheeler farm,  a few rods south of the railroad crossing on the Burlingame road, east of this village.
    A large number of our citizens, led by a martial band, proceeded to the spot, where the assemblage was called to order by George  Rider, Esq., who was followed by Rev. S. Scoville, who invoked in prayer a blessing on the enterprise. A plow was then started, amid the shouts of the crowd, when the resident Directors, John A. Randall and E. T. Hayes. W.M. Conkey, Treasurer, and B. Gage Berry, Secretary of the Company, each moved a shovel full of dirt, after which others present took a hand with the shovel. Speeches were made by Dr. H.H. Beecher, B. Gage Berry,  Col. Sage, and B. Doran Killian. In the evening a banquet was given at the Eagle, by Messrs. Sage & Williams, the contractors.
    On the afternoon of August 28th, 1869, hundreds of people assembled in the vicinity of the railroad bridge north of the village, and upon the slope near the blast furnace, and patiently awaited the coming of the work train from the north, it being understood that the first locomotive would enter the corporation limits that afternoon.
    Workmen were busily engaged in putting down ties and rails, until the boundary line, a few rods south of the river bridge, was crossed. While the engine played backward and forward north of the line,  assisting in the work, it did not cross, and there was much disappointment manifested on all sides.
    Finally the iron horse was run close up to the corporation line, stopped, a shrill whistle was given, and Pat. Quinn engineered it back to North Norwich, admidst the jeers of all those who had been sold, the screeching from the blast furnace whistle, and the curses of those who had wagered money, cigars, etc., upon the probable crossing of the line that day. Many thought Pat. had been “seen” by those who bet against its crossing.
     But the fun was not over yet, nor the laugh all on one side. Mr. Merchant and other railroad officials chanced to be at the Eagle, and when they learned what had transpired they took teams for North Norwich without delay. There they boarded the engine, and before many minutes had elapsed those who went up in the evening had the pleasure of seeing the locomotive on this side of the line, and of hearing the whistle loudly proclaim the fact. But some those who knew the line would not be crossed, and loudly backed their opinions with bets, failed to responded when called upon.
   On Wednesday evening, October 6th, 1869, the first regular train of cars entered Norwich, arriving from Utica, via the Midland and the Utica, Chenango and Susquehanna Railroads. It was received with music by the band, and cheers and other demonstrations on the part of the assembled crow.
    The first passenger train from Oswego arrived in this village on the afternoon of November 25th, 1869, having on board Hon. D.C. Littlejohn, President of the road, with other railroad officials, newspaper reporters, and a number of ladies and gentlemen as passengers.
    December 23d, 1869, the first train of cars crossed Lyon Brook bridge, and the occasion drew to the spot a large concourse of people, estimated at from one to two thousand. Some of the passengers on that train crossed the frightful chasm for the first time, very much against their will, but no accident occurred.
    July 9th, 1873, the last rail was laid and the last spike driven on the Midland, connecting New York with Oswego. So important an event was observed with appropriate ceremonies, by a large number of gentlemen who had accepted the invitation to be present, and assembled in the woods at Hell Hole, near Westfield Flats. The spike was driven, followed by the firing of cannon, the screaming of five locomotive whistles, music by the band, and speeches by distinguished persons present.
    The first train through from NewYork, a special, with railroad officials, employees, etc., reached this village on Sunday, August 17th, 1873, preparatory to running trains, which commenced on Monday, August 18th.
    Regular trains commenced running on the DeRuyter Branch, between this village and DeRuyter, July 26th, 1871; and the road was opened to Cortland, June 5th, 1872.
    With the subsequent history of the Midland - its successes and reverses - our readers are familiar. It has been shown that with proper management he road will pay; and it is to be hoped that it will fall into the hands of parties who will put in thorough repair and develop its usefulness.
DeRuyter Gleaner
Wed., May 7, 1879

    An engine with several flats and caboose attached, came in on the Midland Monday noon. We understand that they were picking up the new rails that had been replaced by the old ones along the route, and other valuables tax collectors might attach. A steam hand car passed down the track yesterday.

DeRuyter Gleaner
Wed., May 7, 1879

    An engine with several flats and caboose attached, came in on the Midland Monday noon. We understand that they were picking up the new rails that had been replaced by the old ones along the route, and other valuables tax collectors might attach. A steam hand car passed down the track yesterday.

Cazenovia Standard
May 14, 1879

    There is a prospect of trains running over the Midland branch to Norwich this summer.

Chenango Union of Norwich, NY - Thursday, June 16, 1879

Auburn Branch  

   In consequence of the snow blockade on the Auburn Branch last week, Postmaster Spaulding sent the mails by private conveyance on Wednesday. Will. Graham undertook the job, and was accompanied by H. Hendricks, in charge of a large amount of American Express matter. After much hard work they reached DeRuyter on Wednesday evening, and returned to this place Thursday.  
  The road to DeRuyter was opened on Friday, and on Saturday a long train of cars of all descriptions, collected from the line of the road, reached this station. It was the last train, bringing the movable property of the road, which is abandoned.  
   For the accommodation of the traveling and business public, S. Crumb, of Beaver Meadow, has commenced running a Passenger, Freight and Express conveyance between Norwich and South Otselic, arrangements having been made with the American Express Company and with Freight Companies. Passengers and Express matter will be carried each way, daily, arriving from South Otselic at 11 a.m., and leaving from the Spaulding House at 2 p.m. Fare each way, $1, and from intermediate stations in proportion. Freight will run from Norwich on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and from South Otselic on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. James Crandall has charge of the passenger and express conveyance.  
    Until a permanent arrangement is made by the Department, for carrying the mails on this route, Will. Graham will deliver them, leaving Norwich on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and returning on the alternate days. 

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Wed., July 30, 1879

Trains on the Auburn branch are hereafter to run only as far as Otselic.

Refrigerator Cars. 
   ______

    Several refrigerator cars recently added to the rolling stock of the N.Y. & O. Midland R.R., are now standing in the yard in this village. They are intended for the transportation of butter, cheese, berries etc. The cars were constructed in the Midland shops at Oswego, are very ingenious contrivances and must be a great improvement over the old cars for the purpose of shipping butter and keeping it cool and sweet. 
    The exterior of of the car is the same as an ordinary box car, but the interior is lined with a sheathing, leaving a space between the outer and inner walls for the air to circulate. Inside doors as nearly air tight as possible are also attached, and in each end of the car near the roof is an ice tank of vulcanized iron, from which runs a two inch pipe to the bottom of the car to let off the water that accumulates from the melting ice, the pipe being bent in the form of a hook at the bottom, so that at all times it is full of water and prevents the air from reaching the ice tanks, which once filled with ice will last four days. 
    These cars are to run on the Midland, from Norwich every day, commencing next week, and we have no doubt that our dairymen will avail themselves of this opportunity of transporting their goods to market, as by so doing they can place their dairy products in market fresh every morning, in condition to compete in price with the most favored nearby localities. Indeed with such conveniences as are now afforded them for a trifling additional cost of carrying, practically speaking, Chenango county is as nearby as Orange county. This new attention to the wants of Chenango farmers, commends the Midland to their generous patronage.

Chenango Union
July 31, 1879

    The railroad timetable might well be made to read “an engine and four boxcars will pass this station semi-occasionally. The railroad is called “the way cast up for berry pickers to walk in.” - Plymouth correspondent.

Cazenovia Standard
Thurs., July 31, 1879

    The DeRuyter New Era says that the Midland Railroad authorities are taking up the side tracks in that village. Also, it is reported that the weekly train over the Auburn branch of the island between Norwich and DeRuyter is soon to be abandoned.

Chenango Union
Thursday, July 31, 1879

    Plymouth -  The railroad is called the "way cast up for berry-pickers to walk in". The railroad's time table might well be made to read: "An engine and four box-cars will pass this station, semi-occasionally.”

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Saturday, Aug. 16, 1879

One bent of the Wibert Trestle on the Auburn branch above Otselic, was burned on Thursday. It delayed the up train a short time. It is supposed to have been the work of incendiary. The damage has been repaired.

Chenango Union 
Thursday, June 10, 1880

  A train went over the abandoned Auburn Branch of the Midland on Thursday, and there was considerable curiosity among those on the line of the road, as to what was the cause of this unusual visitation. There are rumors that the road is to be opened again, under the new organization, and put in repair, which we hope may prove true; but from what we can learn upon inquiry, there is as yet no foundation for the report.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Wed.,  April 13, 1881

   Beaver Meadow -  General Superintendent J.E. Childs, Superintendent C.W. Lanpher and Road Master R. Brock made a tour of inspection over the Auburn branch on the 7th, and lead us to infer that we are to have a railroad in operation in the near future which, if true, will be hailed with delight by the citizens along the branch.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Tuesday, April 19, 1881

A party of railroad officials including Supt. Childs of the Ontario and Western, went over the Auburn Branch on Thursday. What they propose doing with the abandoned line we are not informed, but judging from indications, we should not be surprised to see trains running on the branch here for many months.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
May 4, 1881
  
Good News for the Branch 
                 ___
    A Cortland correspondent of the Syracuse Herald sends that paper the following announcement: 
   "It is stated by good authority that the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira Railroad is now virtually under the control of the New York, Ontario & Western Railroad Company, by right of purchase, and that the officials of that road will at once look over the ground, with a view of putting a line through, probably to Norwich, and possibly westward from that village. 
  "It is said that they had previously opened the Ithaca, Auburn & Western Railroads from Freeville and are completing that line to Auburn from which point they will reach Buffalo, which will complete a through road between that city and New York." 
  This will prove good news if true to the towns in the western portion of this County, as it insures them something more than "two streaks of rust" for their bonded indebtedness, and gives them precisely what they bonded for, a through connection with New York and Buffalo. The report also comes to us from other sources, and we believe the Ontario & Western, will consult their own interest in making permanent their control of this connection and business over their road from Norwich east. We shall look confidently for the early fulfillment of a scheme which can but prove of vital importance to the O. & W., as well as to the people of this County generally.

Chenango Union 
Thurs., April 28, 1881

   It is reported that the Auburn Branch of the Midland Road, which has for some time past been closed, is soon to opened by private parties, for the transportation of freight between this village and the trestle, a car making one round trip daily. 

DeRuyter Gleaner
April 28, 1881
                                 The Branch.
                                     _____
    This long neglected institution is to be made useful to the people in a small way this summer. Milo Miles, of Beaver Meadow, has secured the requisite consent of the Superintendent, and is now constructing a car and engine with which to transport freight between Norwich and the trestle, making one round trip daily.
    This will be a great convenience to the people, and we hope the venture may encourage the company or individuals to do something more at a not very remote day. For the present we must be content with Miles' express, and thankful also. - Chenango Telegraph. Hurrah for Milo Miles.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Sat., June 11, 1881

Miles & Bissell ran their new steam car from Beaver Meadow to Norwich over the Auburn branch for the first time on Tuesday last. The car is capable of hauling about six tons of freight.

From the Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Monday, June 13, 1881

    Miles & Bissell are operating the Auburn branch, between this place and Norwich, with a fair degree of success. They will add steam to their car soon, which will save the necessity of a horse, and will do away with a large amount of pushing which had been the propelling power of late.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Aug. 27, 1881

   Beaver Meadow -  Milo Miles and William B. Ireland have purchased an engine which they intend putting on the Auburn Branch for the purpose of hauling passengers and freight between Otselic and Norwich. We hope to see the branch once more under successful operation.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Sept. 17, 1881

Beaver Meadow -  Miles & Ireland have their steam car in good working order and are making daily trips to and from Norwich. It will be appreciated by people living along the Branch.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph 
Friday, Dec. 30, 1881

Milo Miles is engaging in taking up the rails on the DeRuyter branch of the Midland from Crumb Hll to Otselic. Take up the bonds, too, Milo.

DeRuyter New Era
Thursday, January 5, 1882

    Men were at work last week taking up the iron on the Auburn branch from Crumb Hill east, and still we hear rumors that the line will be put in condition for business in the near future. The prospects for its being run again soon are decidedly unfavorable.
    Mr. George Crandall, proprietor of the stage route from DeRuyter to Norwich, proposes to run a stage and express line from South Otselic to DeRuyter and return on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. South Otselic to Norwich and return Tuesdays, thursdays and Saturdays. We can see no reason why this enterprise will not meet with success, as there is a large express and passenger business between these points naturally. Mr. Crandall has our best wishes. 
Semi-Weekly Telegraph
January 7, 1882

    Men are at work, at least last week, taking up the iron on the Auburn branch from Crumb Hill east, and we still hear rumors that the line will be put in condition for business in the near future. The  prospects for its being run again are decidedly unfavorable.


Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph  of Norwich, NY - Wednesday, February 8, 1882

The Auburn Branch 
              ___
   Editor Telegraph:  The subject of greatest present interest with people along the Canasawacta and Otselic valleys is the railroad. The question is, Will the branch be re-opened? If so, when? 
   All arrangement which, would be most satisfactory to the people in the northwestern part of our county, and which, all things considered, would seem to possess many advantages over the present line, would be to turn down the valley at Otselic and consolidate with the Cortland road. This road was originally designed to constitute part of the Utica, Ithaca and Elmira Railroad, and is already graded from Cortland to Cincinnatus, on the Otselic river. 
   Much of the stone work is already built and some bridges erected, leaving a distance of about twelve miles along the Otselic valley to a junction with the branch at or near the trestle, to be filled in, and the entire line is ready for the ties and rails. Such an arrangement would cut out the Crumb Hill section, with its heavy grades, numerous trestles, and snow blockades, for nearly half the year. 
   Will it pay?   
   It would control the transportation of freight from a large and productive section of country - a business now divided among five different roads - and must be a valuable feeder for the mainline. 
   It is but just to say that the branch never had a fair test of what it's business would be under favorable circumstances. It should be borne in mind that it was operated during a period of the most distressing business depression that has existed within the remembrance of the present generation - a time when every industry, and all the productive energies of the country were paralyzed and panic stricken, and stood helpless and despondent, gazing into the darkness and uncertainty of the future. 
   In the midst of this financial ruin the year 1879 dawned upon us, and with it came resumption, and resumption brought deliverance and prosperity to the people. The relighted fires in a thousand furnaces quickly dispelled the darkness, and the giant enterprise of our Yankee civilization is again marching onward, constantly opening new avenues for labor and capital, and bringing additional blessings to the people. 
   The line suggested would be a little more than fifty miles in length, being the old road from Norwich to Otselic and Pitcher to Cincinnatus, where a large business is done in the manufacture of cutters, thence to Solon and McGrawville, where a corset factory furnishes employment for several hundred hands, and from this point to Cortland. It would be a road with light grades, free from trestles, and a route where snow blockades would be seldom or never known. It would have for a part of its business the transportation of the dairy product, and farm produce generally, from a belt of country varying from ten to twenty miles in width, all of which finds a market at the seaboard, and is thee mostly exchanged for general merchandise, to be returned over the same route, and distributed along the line - a business not spasmodic and uncertain, but constant and enduring, - a business which will never be less, but will constantly increase. 
   The rapidly increasing business of the country, the improving condition of the people, the increasing demand for fresh butter, and the immense export trade in cheese during the summer months, call loudly for better facilities for transportation and travel. 
   Farmers, merchants, manufactures and businessmen along the line, we must have a railroad. We cannot afford to do without it. Then, let us agitate this question, and continue to agitate till we get it. The company or capital that takes hold of this enterprise, and carries it into effect cannot fail to be satisfied with the results. 
   C.H. Stanton  Ireland's Mills, Feb. 6th, 1882.  
   
(Note:  In 1882, the Auburn branch was torn up and never replaced. A railroad called the  Utica, Chenango & Cortland  was eventually built from Cortland to Cincinnatus, but this was only partially graded. Later a company called the  Erie & Central New York  completed the line and opened on April 21, 1898. For years an extension to Otselic wad discussed but was never built. The line, nicknamed the  'Gee Whiz' , was taken over by the  Delaware, Lackawanna & Western  on Dec. 1, 1903 and operated until Dec. 29, 1961 when it was abandoned).  

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph  of Norwich, NY - Saturday, March 11, 1882

Beaver Meadow -  Milo Miles has sold his engine, "Pathfinder", No. 3, to parties in Smyrna, N.Y. This is the engine that hauled the local freight, on the Auburn Branch, last season. 

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
April 12, 1882

   The rails on the Auburn branch have been taken up from the Otselic trestle to the main line.

DeRuyter New Era
April 13, 1882

   The removal of the iron from the track of the abandoned DeRuyter Branch of the old Midland railroad is nearly completed, the wreckers, who commenced at the western terminus, having reached the corporation limits, and the work of demolition will probably be finished within the present week. - Chenango Union.
   The DeRuyter and South Otselic stage is meeting with good patronage, and must grow in favor as it becomes better known. Mr. Crandall is always on time, rain or shine, is obliging, and transacts all business faithfully.

DeRuyter New Era
March 9, 1882

    We understand that the Crumb Hill post office will be discontinued this week.

Auburn News & Bulletin
April 24, 1882

    A new IA&W depot is just being completed at Venice Center.  This is the fourth new station now built along the line.  North Lansing, Genoa, and Merrifield have been previously favored. Coal trestles are being built at Genoa, Venice Center and Auburn.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
May 6, 1882

    All the trestles on the Auburn branch between the junction of the NYO&W and North Broad Street is being removed.

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., May 11, 1882

    We would inform the N.Y.O.& W. Railroad Company that they have forgotten something. The rails from DeRuyter to Crumb Hill are still on the grade; also the old trestles await orders of “the powers that be.”

DeRuyter New Era
Thurs., June 1, 1882

    A gang of Ontario & Western railroad men arrived here Tuesday and have commenced taking up the iron on the branch between here and Crumb Hill. An official of the above road was in town last week, and said that the Ontario & Western people were considering the idea of laying a narrow gauge track between DeRuyter and Norwich. We shall see.

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
June 7, 1882

    Men were at work, last week, taking up the iron on the Auburn branch from Crumb Hill east, and we still hear rumors that the line will be put in condition for business in the near future. The prospects for its being run again are decidedly unfavorable. --  DeRuyter New Era. 

Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph
July 22, 1882

    The old Midland track from DeRuyter to Norwich is now all taken up between these two places, a distance of 28 miles. All that is seen is a trail of cuts, fills, embankments and trestles tottering with decay - all that is left of this once prosperous and promising line of railroad. It is a thing of the past, but will undoubtedly for many years be remembered by the people along the route. Many tons of old rails, spikes, fish plates, bolts, etc., are piled up in the railroad yard at DeRuyter awaiting shipment to the now prosperous N.Y.O. & W. Railroad. 

Oswego Palladium
Dec. 12, 1882

         The Abandoned Auburn Branch.
    
    Norwich, Dec. 9. - Pursuant to call, a meeting of railroad commissioners and representative men, from the different towns on the line of the abandoned Auburn branch railroad, and others, bonded for the construction of the road, was held at the courthouse this afternoon, to consider their rights, under the law, and the legal liabilities of the New York, Ontario and Western railroad company, in connection with the abandonment and destruction of the Auburn branch.
    After considerable discussion and comparing of views a committee of two from each town was appointed to solicit funds and further ascertain the sentiment and wishes of the people with reference to bringing suit compelling the New York, Ontario and Western railroad company, the successor of the old Midland, to open up the branch road.

Semi-Weekly Telegraph
Dec. 13, 1882

                                                         That Auburn Branch
                                                                   ________
    Pursuant to call a meeting of and representative men from the different towns on the line of the abandoned Auburn Branch railroad, was held in the grand jury room, at the court  house on Saturday last, at 12 o’clock, P.M., to consider the rights, under the law, and the legal liabilities of the New York, Ontario & Western railroad company in connection with the abandonment and total disuse of the branch. 
    At the opening George P. Cushman, of Plymouth, was chosen chairman and A.F. Gladding, of Norwich, secretary. Remarks were made by R.A. Stanton, in which he clearly and in an explicit manner stated the premises in the case, arguing that people along the route who were taxpayers in a greater or less degree did not propose to allow this section of land occupied by the road bed to lay hole much longer, and that there was not the least doubt in his mind that the company could be made to do one of two or three things, either to return the money they had been furnished to build the road, or put the line into suitable condition again and operate it.
    He pointed out several methods by which, in his opinion, ,the result could be accomplished. One idea being to lay the matter before the Attorney General, or Court of Appeals, obliging them to forfeit their charter; another was by order of mandamus, tis latter he considered the better way. Here the gentleman cited a similar instance of the code of the Albany and Vermont railroad showing a decision of the courts, negative to allowing that company to appropriate part, and not the whole of their road, and were compelled to do so.
    J.W. Church followed with able remarks, and closed by offering to start the ball of funds by subscribing $20 towards defraying expense of litigation.  A.F. Gladding spoke at some length  in universal favor, but setting forth some of the probable obstacles which might come before the prosecution. He was followed by John inker and D.B. Cushman, of Plymouth. Supt. Lanpher gave a few brief statistics in regard to the losings of the road while he was in charge, which showed clearly that the branch was not a paying investment.
    After further comparing views, a committee of two from each town was appointed to solicit funds and confer with the people in reference to bringing suit against the N.Y.O.& W. Railroad; as will be seen by the appended letter handed in by the secretary, the further result of the meeting, together with committees appointed:
                                                                                                              Norwich, N.Y., December 11th, 1882
    Dear Sir - On Saturday last a number of citizens of this county, interested in the re-opening of the Auburn Branch of the N.Y. O. & W. Railway met at the Court House in this village, pursuant to a call therefor signed and published.
    At the meeting George P. Cushman of Plymouth, was made chairman and the undersigned secretary, and after the transaction of some other business, upon motion of J.W. Church, Esq., the following resolution was adopted:
    “That a committee be appointed by the chair, consisting of wii from each town interested in the re-opening of the Auburn Branch, to take into consideration the feasibility of compelling the N.Y.O.& W. Railway to re-open and run said branch, and to solicit subscriptions for the purpose of decrying the expenses of any legal proceedings it may be thought best to institute to enforce the re-opening and running of the same, and that such a committee be requested to report and adjourned meeting, to be held at the Court House at Norwich, N.Y., December 16th, 1882, at one o’clock P.M.”
    In pursuance of the forgoing resolution the chairman appointed the following gentlemen to compose such committee: - H.C. Miner, Esq. and Charles H. Maxon, Esq., of DeRuyter; Sprague Barber, Esq. and LeRoy Newton, Esq., of Otselic;  L.C. Sweet, Esq. and C. H. Stanton, Esq.., of Smyrna; John B. Tinker, Esq. and W.B. Munroe, Esq., of Plymouth; W.S. Willcox, Esq. and E.P. Brown, Esq., of Lincklaen; Charles Rogers, Esq. and C.H. Browning, Esq., of Pharsalia; J.W. Church, Esq., and F.B. Mitchell, Esq., of Norwich.
    The secretary was also directed to notify the members of such committee of their appointment, and in pursuance of such direction I address you this letter; and because some of the committee were not present at the meeting, I make the foregoing statement an copy the resolution in full, that you may better understand the situation.
    I also enclose form for subscription to be used under the resolution.
    Hoping hat you will act upon the committee and be present at the adjourned meeting Saturday next, I remain,
    Very respectfully, yours, &c.
                                                           Albert F. Gladding                                                                          
    
Oswego Morning Post
Friday, Dec. 15, 1882

          The Abandoned Auburn Branch
     The abandonment of the Auburn branch of the old Midland railroad is now creating quite a stir among the people living in the towns along the line of the road who have bonded heavily, and are trying to wipe out their bonded indebtedness after being deprived of the road.
   The branch for which the towns of DeRuyter, Plymouth and Otselic have been bonded extends from DeRuyter to Norwich. The most of the rails have been removed, and the people demand their money or the railroad pledge them.
    A meeting of the railroad commissioners and representative men from the towns along the line was held at Norwich Sunday afternoon last, when, after considerable discussion, a committee of two from each town was appointed to ascertain the sentiment of the people and solicit funds.

Cortland Democrat 
Dec. 27, 1882

The Abandoned Auburn Branch       
                ____
    The abandonment of the Auburn branch of the old Midland railroad is now creating quite a stir among the people living in the towns along the line of the road who have bonded heavily, and are tying to wipe out their bonded indebtedness after being deprived of the road. The branch for which the towns of DeRuyter, Plymouth and Otselic have been bonded extends from DeRuyter to Norwich. 
    The most of the rails have been removed, and the people justly demand that their money or the railroad pledged them. A meeting of the railroad commissioners and representative men from the towns along the line was held at Norwich Saturday afternoon, when after considerable discussion a committee of two from each town was appointed to ascertain the settlement of the people and solicit funds. 
    The committee named for DeRuyter is Supervisor Charles H. Maxson and H.C. Miner Esq. It is not unlikely that legal proceedings will soon be instituted against the New York, Ontario & Western Railway Company by the people who now demand their rights.  --    Oneida Union 

DeRuyter New Era
Dec. 21,1882

    It would seem like old times to take a trip by rail to Norwich, and near Dave Shattuck call out “Crumb Hill,” “Otselic,” etc. Such a thing now seems among the possibilities. It is quite probable that within a year the rails will again be laid on this abandoned line.

DeRuyter New Era
January 11, 1883

    We notice among the postal changes that the Crumb Hill post office has been discontinued. 

DeRuyter New Era
April 5, 1883

    Three new houses are to be built this summer in Lazyville by Perkins, Wilcox, and Coleman, and two good framed houses have recently taken the places of two primitive ones made of logs. Lazyville will soon have to change its name as the people are beginning to work.

DeRuyter  Gleaner
Aug. 30, 1883

   Enough money has been subscribed by the people along the abandoned Auburn branch to commence legal proceedings against the Ontario & Western Company. The dance will soon open.

DeRuyter New Era
Thursday, Sept. 6, 1883

    The Postmaster General has established a new post office in Chenango County and given it the name of Stanbro. It occupies the territory formerly known as Upper Beaver Meadow, and will prove a great convenience to the people in that section. Dr. Stanbro was, many years ago, postmaster at Upper Beaver Meadow, and was a leading and influential citizen of that portion of the town, and the designation of the new office is a deserved compliment to his memory.
    Our friend, Dennis Thompson, has received the commission as first postmaster under the new designation. He is centrally located, and his business qualifications and sterling integrity make him just the man for the place.

DeRuyter New Era
Nov. 8, 1883

    Nathan Cuyle, who ran a steam shovel at the Crumb Hill cut when the Midland was being constructed, was in town last week. He is now engaged in the same business at Oswego.

Cortland Democrat
April 1, 1884

                       The Auburn Branch
                             ____
A Suit to Compel the Reopening of the Road.
                             ___
    Norwich, April 7. - A suit has been commenced in this county against the New York, Ontario and Western Railway Company, in the name of people on the relation of Willard B. Monroe of Plymouth, to compel the Company to reopen and operate the Cortland branch from DeRuyter to Norwich.
    It is claimed on the part of the relator, Mr. Munroe, that the road had no right to abandon a part of its line while it holds a part of it and continues to operate it. He was at the time a large dealer in eggs and expended considerable money in preparing for the business on an extensive scale to Plymouth. After continuing the business for a time, that part of the road was abandoned and he was compelled to abandon the business by reason of it. He also claims that as a resident of the town of Plymouth, which bonded for the construction of this branch road and as a large taxpayer of the town, he is greatly injured in that respect and has the right to compel the road to perform its duty.

Cortland Democrat
May 9, 1884
                  
                          The Auburn Branch Question
                                       ___
    The people living along the line of the abandoned Auburn Branch are pleased with the decision in the case of the town of Sandy Creek against the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg Railroad. The case is in all respects similar to that of Willard B. Monroe and others against the New York, Ontario and Western Railroad  to show cause why the Auburn Branch shall not be operated.
    The Railroad Commissioners, after an extended  examination of facts in the first mentioned case, have decided that the company must rebuild  and operate the road. The case is one where the town of Sandy Creek bonded for $80,000 to assist in building the Syracuse Northern Road. The road was sold on a mortgage foreclosure and the new company ceased to operate the road and took up the rails from that portion of the road between Sandy Creek and Pulaski.
    The Commissioners now decided that the company must relay their track and operate the abandoned portion of the road. Of course the decision of the Commissioners has not the force of a judicial precedent, but coming, as it does, from a body of men which was created by the State Legislature to consider the rights of the people as against railroad corporations the decision of the Commissioners will have a great moral force in determining the question whether or not the Auburn Branch shall be rebuilt and operated - Norwich Telegraph *

*(Note: The R.W. & O. abandoned the former Syracuse Northern between Pulaski and Lacona, a distance of eight miles, in 1879. It was considered redundant as the R.W.& O. paralleled it between Pulaski and Lacona via Richland. Abandonment also eliminated a long bridge across the Salmon River in Pulaski. This line was never rebuilt. Attempts to have the Auburn branch rebuilt also failed).
Cortland Democrat
Friday, May 8, 1885

    While tearing down a portion of the old Midland trestle, the other day, Reuben Babbit, of DeRuyter, fell some twelve feet, injuring his heel so that assistance of a cane has since been necessary.

Brookfield Courier
July 20, 1885
    Wibert trestle, the largest structure of its kind between DeRuyter and Norwich, on the line of the abandoned Midland branch fell recently.
    (Madison Courier, Nov. 7, 1870 - Work on the DeRuyter Branch of the Midland is now being pushed with energy. The Wibert trestle is now finished. The trestle is 75 feet in height and 400 feet in length. Over 15 tons of iron bolts and over 250,000 feet of lumber were used in its construction. The track is laid across the Otselic creek nearly to section 20, and an excursion train has been run to Norwich from that point.

Syracuse Standard
January 6, 1886

    DeRuyter - The prospect now is that under the last decision of the court the New York, Ontario & Western Railroad company will rebuild that portion of the Auburn branch of the old Midland between DeRuyter and Norwich, which the company had abandoned.
    Two decisions to that effect have been made by the Supreme court on the petition of stockholders and inhabitants on the line of the road. It is thought, however, that the route may be somewhat varied,, so that the road will avoid the mountainous districts of Crumb Hill and traverse a portion of the Otselic Valley.

Brookfield Courier
Thurs., Jan. 14, 1886

    Rebuild the Auburn Branch
    The prospect now is that under the last decision of the court, the New York, Ontario & Western Railroad Company will rebuild that portion of the Auburn branch of the old Midland between DeRuyter and Norwich, which the company has abandoned.
    Two decisions to that effect have been made by the Supreme Court on the petition of the stockholders and inhabitants on the line of the road. It is thought, however, that the route may be somewhat varied, so that the road will avoid the mountainous districts of Crumb Hill and traverse a portion of the Otselic Valley.

Adirondack News, St. Regis Falls, N.Y.,
Sat., January 12, 1889

             Stole the Entire Train
   A railway train, consisting one one engine and several coaches, were stolen on the morning of January 3 at Freeville, N.Y., in an exciting and unusual way. It was on the Ithaca, Auburn and Western railroad, which runs between Freeville and Auburn.
  About  breakfast time, F.T. Peet, ex-superintendent of the road, appeared at the Freeville station, while the engineer and conductor were at breakfast. Mr. Peet suddenly climbed into the cab and opened the throttle. The fireman was in the cab but did not protest, and away steamed the engine.
   The outwitted engineer and conductor and the frequenters of the railway station were stricken dumb with astonishment. The ex-superintendent ran the train about a mile out of town and the sent a section hand with a handcar back to the station for the United States Mail, which was delivered to him without parley.
   On his return to the stolen train the throttle was again opened and the train proceeded to Auburn full speed.  There is some litigation between the gentlemen represented by Mr. Peet and the Southern Central road, which low leases the Ithaca, Auburn & Western. The train taken by Mr. Peet comprises nearly the entire rolling stock of the road. The ex-superintendent evidently believes that possession is nine points of the law.

Brookfield Courier, Wed., May 29, 1889

              Railroad Matters
                        ____
    Wednesday noon, a stranger about 75 years of age alighted from the 12:30 train on the New York Central Railroad and inquired when the stage left for Hamilton. He was somewhat surprised to learn that Hamilton had railroad communication and that he could reach it by way of Utica. The stranger was a native of Hamilton and left there 53 years ago for north-western Missouri, where he has since lived. At that time Hamilton’s  connection with the outside world was by the stage route to Canastota, and, Rip Van Winkle-like, he supposed that the citizens still depended on the same slow means of travel.
  The railroad cauldron still keeps quietly boiling, but just when the matter will get simmered down to the real essence we are unable to state.  The survey of the Oneida & Oneonta road is in progress, the party now being in the vicinity of Morris, probably between that village and New Berlin.  They will probably size up the hills and dales of Brookfield ere long in our opinion if the Brookfield railroad route is not adopted the George Lewis route, through the northern part of the town, will be the one selected. But we await developments hoping in time that all this fuss will ultimately bring us a railroad.
   The suit to compel the Ontario & Western to re-open and operate the old Auburn Branch, from Norwich to DeRuyter and Ithaca, was on trial at Norwich last Wednesday, before S.D. Halladay, referee. Although this is an important suit, we fail to find any reference to it in the Telegraph, or dailies. The decision will probably be reserved for some time.
    Mr. Randall and his corps of surveyor at work on the Oneida & Oneonta line, are boarding at the Gardner House in Morris. They are now near Andrew Washington's farm, and will have got around on the west side of the hill before this paper is read by many of our subscribers. They have not found the grade over 65 feet to the mile yet. - Morris Chronicle.

Railway World
June 29, 1889, P. 611

    New York, Ontario and Western.—A. Middletown, N. Y., dispatch says: By order of the Supreme Court of the Sixth Judicial District, S. D. Halliday, referee, is taking testimony in the action brought by Willard B. Monroe in the name of the people against the New York, Ontario and Western Railroad Company. It is in effect a suit brought by certain towns which aided financially in the construction of a railroad. The railroad failed to pay operating expenses, and was, therefore, dismantled and abandoned. The towns are now trying to compel the railroad company to restore the equipment and reopen the line for traffic.
    When the New York and Oswego Midland Railroad (now the Ontario and Western) was projected in 1886, the scheme included the building of a branch from the main line at Norwich, via DeRuyter and Cortland, to Auburn. The funds to build the branch were to be supplied by the towns through which the branch was to pass, under the provisions of the town bonding act of April 5th, 1866. The following towns at the eastern end of the proposed branch issued to the railroad company twenty-year 7 per cent, bonds, as follows: Norwich Village, $75,000; Plymouth, $100,000; Pharsalia, $25,000; Otselic, $85,700; Lincklaen, $20,000; DeRuyter town, $102,300; DeRuyter Village, $20,000. With this fund of $428,000 the Midland company built the first section of the projected branch, from Norwich to DeRuyter, 28 miles, and opened it for traffic in July, 1871. But the DeRuyter branch never secured a paying business. This was the condition of affaire when, in 1873, the New York and Oswego Midland, having completed and opened its main line and become bankrupt, passed into the management of Abram S. Hewitt and John S. Stevens as receivers.
   The receivers soon found themselves in hot water over the tax-rate question with the towns on the DeRuyter branch. The common stock of the railroad company, which these towns had taken in exchange for their bonds, had been wiped out by the failure of the company, and the burden of taxation to meet the interest and principal of the bonds was heavy. The towns undertook to recoup some portion of their losses on the stock of the company by imposing, as the receivers complained, an inordinate and unjust weight of taxation on the company's property. The receivers refused to pay these taxes. The town authorities in several instances set to work to collect their claims by levying upon the company's locomotives and cars. The company retaliated by refusing to stop any of its trains at the stations within the limits of the offending towns. After four or five years of this sort of lighting the receivers determined to abandon the effort to run the DeRuyter branch.    
    Accordingly, in 1879, all regular trains were withdrawn, and shortly afterward the rails were taken up and the line was dismantled. The pending action is brought in behalf of the bonded towns to compel the Ontario and Western Railroad Company to reconstruct the abandoned railroad and restore the traffic facilities promised to the towns in consideration of the $428,000 contributed by them toward the original work.

Cortland Democrat
Aug.1, 1890

    David Shattuck, of Norwich, has purchased Messrs Spaulding & Holcomb their interest in the Eagle Hotel, in that place, and will take possession August 1st. The new proprietor, we understand, will thoroughly overhaul and place the house in first-class order.
    Mr. Shattuck needs no introduction to the public. From the opening of the old Midland railroad, through its changes, he was one of the most popular conductors on the line, and made hosts of friends. A short imd since he resigned his position to embark in this enterprise. As host of the Eagle, Mr. Shattuck will be remembered by many friends whose pleasure it has been to meet him in the past, and  who will be sure to renew his acquaintance in the future.

Cortland Standard
April 6, 1894

The Auburn Branch
                   (From the Norwich Sun)
    The Auburn branch of the New York, Ontario & Western railroad will probably be in operation again by November 1 of this year.
    In case Referee Halliday of Ithaca decided the suit of Willard B. Monroe against the O.& W. it is understood that work will be commenced at once in relaying tracks and building new bridges. The grade is already established and the entire expense of placing the branch in shape for operation would not exceed $200,000. The old route would be followed as the company do not propose to buy any new property.

Cortland Standard
Nov. 23, 1894

                    That Abandoned Railroad
                                  ___
    After a delay of years, Referee Halliday has decided the case of Willard Monroe and others against the New York, Ontario & Western Railway company, to compel the company to re-open and operate Auburn branch of the old Midland railroad, abandoned some 15 years ago.
    The decision is in favor of the company, and the taxpayers along the line of the old branch road will continue to pay their bonded indebtedness, with no prospect of the re-opening of the road, which was great convenience to them, and to the public as well. 
   The referee holds that the new organization, arising out of the failure of the old, is not obliged to operate the road, any more than any individual would be who had gotten into debt by borrowing money to invest in an enterprise which had proven disastrous. - Chenango Union.

DeRuyter Gleaner
Thursday, July 12, 1900

The late Emory H. Card
    Emory H. Card, one of the oldest engineers on the O.& W. road, died of apoplexy at his home in Norwich, Sunday, aged 72 years. Fifty years ago he began his career as a railroad man with the Erie. When the Auburn branch of the Midland road was built through DeRuyter some thirty years ago Mr. Card was the engineer of the construction train and later for many years held a regular run on the branch.
     He ran the first train of passenger cars that came to DeRuyter, and the writer remembers how with swelling pride and bulging eyes he waited its majestic approach. Mr. Card was the hero (in our estimation) of that eventful day. How often in days that followed did we presume on his good nature by clambering stealthily in the cab for a ride on the wonderful locomotive.  For his gentle consideration of the boys of that period we shall ever remember him. To the surviving members of his family we extend condolence. - Brookfield Courier.

DeRuyter Gleaner
Sep. 21, 1911

Excerpt from obituary of George S. Mason
(Born in Brookfield, May 13, 1833, died Sept. 18, 1911)

   “When the Auburn branch of the ‘Old Midland’ railroad was constructed from Cortland or Freeville to Norwich, Mr. Mason was foreman of a force of budge builders and practically all the trestles were erected under his supervision. Many of these were massive structures, the one at Wibert’s being some 80 feet high, and the largest one, at Otselic Center, over 1,200 feet long.”

Norwich Sun of Norwich, NY - Friday, December 6, 1912

The Late David Shattuck   
Well -Known Railroad, Business and Hotel Man 
Passes to His Reward  
                ___      
                                
   Norwich, Dec. 6 -  David Shattuck, for many years well known in railroad and business circles in Norwich, died at his home on North Broad street on Tuesday (Dec. 3), aged 78. Death was due to apoplexy.   ( Sudden loss of muscular control, sensation, and consciousness, resulting from the rupture or blocking of a blood vessel in the brain. A massive stroke. )  
   Mr. Shattuck was the son of John and Mary Knapp Shattuck and was born in Norwich July 26, 1834. After attending Oxford Academy and spending a few years on the farm, Mr. Shattuck engaged in construction work on the old New York & Oswego Midland Railroad in the promotion of which his father was one of the pioneers. 
   He helped to run the first locomotive to cross Lyon Brook bridge, which spanned a great height the stream where as a lad he found his favorite fishing. Later, after running trains upon the Auburn branch, he was in charge of the crew that dismantled that section of the road. He then became a conductor on the main line and for many years was on the passenger runs between Norwich and Utica and Norwich and Oswego. 
   In 1890 he quit the railroad service to become the landlord of the Eagle Hotel. After several years in the hotel business he retired to the homestead at Haynes, where he lived until two years ago, when he became a resident of Norwich. 
   For many years Mr. Shattuck was a prominent member of the Masonic bodies of Norwich. He was among the oldest past commanders of the Norwich Commandery, Knights Templar. In politics he was a Democrat and had been frequently named by his party for important offices. 
   Mr. Shattuck was twice married. His first wife, Harriet Noble, of Oxford, to whom he was married September 19, 1855, died December 29, 1864. September 19, 1866, he married Rachael Comstock daughter of Abel and Esther Comstock, of Norwich, who survives him. He is also survived by a son, John D. Shattuck of Dudley Park, Pa., who is general manager of the Suburban Gas Company of Philadelphia, and one daughter, Harriet, wife of Louis G. Quackenbush of Oneida. Another daughter, wife of Bertrand Wait, died less than a year ago. 
   Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon in charge of Norwich Commandery, K.T., Rev. Paul Riley Allen officiating.

Homer Republican
Aug. 6, 1915
DeRuyter - Cortland Branch Transferred to Lehigh.
    Pursuant to the provisions of a special act of the last legislature the Public Service Commission has approved the transfer from the New York, Ontario & Western Railway Company to he Lehigh Valley Railway Company of the line between DeRuyter and Cortland.
    This line is still owned by the O.& W. though it has been leased since 1884 to the Elmira, Cortland & Northern, which latter company was consolidated with the Lehigh in 1905 and the Lehigh has since been operating the road as part of its line from Elmira to Canastota.
    Originally $270,000 in stock and bonds of the E.C. & N.were paid to the O.& W. as a commuted rental for the line and it was agreed that if it was ever sold no further consideration could be demanded by the O.& W.
    The line begins at the Lehigh junction at Division street, DeRuyter and runs southwesterly through Cortland county to the Auburn branch of the Lehigh in South Main street, Cortland.*
*   “The Elmira, Cortland and Northern Railroad Company leased from the New York, Ontario & Western Railway Company 19.53 miles extending from Cortland to DeRuyter, N.Y. This mileage was leased for a period of 80 years from Mar. 10, 1884, the rent for the entire period being paid in advance. On Aug. 17, 1916, the property was deeded to the Lehigh Valley RailWay, without cost to the latter.” - P. 157, Valuation Reports of the Interstate Commerce Commission, Valuation Docket 805, Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, Et Al,  1930.

Utica Saturday Globe
December 18, 1920

The First Train Into Norwich  

C.H. Brown of Pittsburg, Was a Former Employee of the New York and Oswego Midland, and Tells of the Big Event in Letter    
                                                         ____
   Norwich, Dec. 17. -   C.H. Brown, an old New York & Oswego Midland employee who now resides in Pittsburg, Pa., where he is employee by the Duquesne Light Company, is a subscriber to the Chenango edition of the Saturday Globe. He is much interested in the story of the early days of the road and writes to say that he recalls the first passenger train run into Norwich, and went to work for the company the same year the road was opened.  
    He was later a brakeman on the Auburn branch under Conductor David Shattuck when the road was under construction by Sage, Williams & Jerome. Among the old engineers he recalls Frank Fisher, "Pat" Crane, "Shorty" Freeman, Ed Williams, John Skinner, Ed McNiff, "Old Daddy" Card and "Old Windy" Blake. The engines were woodburners with "stacks as large as airships" and the engines were all named. If he remembers right the company had 27 work trains on the northern division.  
    He recalls the night the track was built into DeRuyter. When the train was run into the town the people met it "with a brass band and free whisky at the Tabor House". Later when the building of the road had reached Scipio about 11 miles from Auburn the "old Midland went bankrupt" and paid the employees with scrip that was worth only about 22 to 26 cents on a dollar.  
    In the Centennial year, 1876, Mr. Brown was yardmaster at Norwich. A Mr. Purdy, who was the company paymaster, was acting as a conductor on one of the trains in a Centennial Special that was made up of several sections. Mr. Purdy's section reached Norwich in the afternoon about 4 o'clock. A coach near the center of the train carried a number of his intimate friends and some members of his family.  
   At his request Mr. Brown cut out the coach from the center of the train and attached it to the rear. The train left Norwich and was nearing Hurley on the way to Philadelphia. Mr. Purdy wanted to send a message to New York reporting that his train was on time. He pulled the bell cord and the engineer stopped the train. A flagman was sent back to signal the section following but too late. The train following plowed into the rear coach of the Purdy section killing several of his friends and some members of his family.  
    "At another time three train crews "coupled up" with 82 old, dinky coal cars with a three-link hook coupler and 18 gondolas on the head end. We had five engines out of Sidney to get the train up the hill - three engines pushing and two pulling. We picked up a section crew at Guilford and strung them along the train in case we broke in two. Ed Welch and myself were going to hold the train down the hill into Norwich. We had our hand brakes all set. When we rounded the horse shoe bend at the Oxford trestle we discovered the train had parted in seven places. On two pieces of the train there was no brakeman.  
    "So we had to let off the brakes and the train ran away. When we hit the Lyon Brook bridge it looked to me to be about an inch long. Luckily the main track happened to be clear. When the train stopped the head engine was nearly to North Norwich. Some of the oldtimers will remember about it."  
    "Just a few words more. I passed the 66th year mark November 4, and I feel about the same as I did 30 years ago. An old white horse came by the electric light plant where I am employed the other day. The old horse was all covered with burdocks from his head to his hind feet. I went out and put my arms around his neck for he looked to me just like an old worn out railroad man, and I have always been told that a railroad man turns into an old white horse at the end."
Cortland Democrat of Cortland, NY - Friday, March 7, 1924

Many Wooden Trestles and Much Snow Forced Midland to Quit 45 Years Ago 
                                   _____ 
    Announcement was made in the Cortland Democrat on Dec. 20, 1878, that the New York and Oswego Midland railroad would abandon its line from Norwich to DeRuyter on Jan. 1, 1879, unless it was snowed in sooner. Mention is made in January of shipments made at DeRuyter by Otselic businessmen and farmers "since the Midland quit running", but some of the oldtimers connected with the road recall that the Midland continued in business until February, and that trains ran until the road was snowed in. The Midland was in financial difficulty and was reorganize as the New York, Ontario & Western.  
   Driving from DeRuyter over Crumb Hill and through the town of Otselic, one would hardly think it ever was a railroad route. In summer it is not difficult to keep in view the embankments and cuts of the former railroad as one drives along the highway. In such weather as this section has had in the past two weeks, the prospector would encounter some of the difficulties that discouraged the managers of the old Midland in the winter of 1879, snow and much of it.  
   Snow, however, was not the greatest perplexity of the railroad company. Between DeRuyter and Norwich there were 14 or 15 wooden trestles, long and high, that were costly to maintain. It was only by building such trestle that a railroad could be possible. Ira Goodsell of South Otselic told The Democrat of a picture of the trestle at Otselic Center, and the one from which the accompanying cut was made was found in the possession of Truman Duncan, who was willing to lend it. Mr. Duncan's house stands not far from the spot where the railroad bank ended and this trestle began. As a young fellow he cut stakes when the structure was put up, and remembers it's beginnings, its nearly 10 years of use, and then its abandonment, and how it was taken down and the timbers removed. 
Trestle 700 Feet Long   
    The trestle was 43 feet high and 700 feet long and the picture shows how it curved between the two sides of the valley crossing. Not far from Mr. Duncan's house, near the west end of the trestle, was the Otselic Center railroad depot, where M.E. Tallett, now of DeRuyter, began his career as station agent in 1873. The freight house was an immense structure and Mr. Tallett did a bug business for himself as a side line, amounting to $25,000 a year. In the old days the railroad agents usually were the coal and feed dealers of the small towns.  
   Mr. Tallett can tell many interesting stories of his experiences as station agent at Otselic Center. The Auburn branch of the Midland ran from Norwich to DeRuyter and thence through Cortland and Freeville to Scipio in Cayuga county. There were two trains each way daily, and in summer there were many excursions from Norwich to Scipio. It was 29 miles by rail from DeRuyter to Norwich, and at Otselic he sold tickets to DeRuyter for 33 cents and to Norwich for 55 cents, at three cents a mile.  
    Mr. Tallett had been teaching school when a young man and one day was approached by the supervisor of Otselic, Sprague Barber, with the suggestion that he take the job as station agent. He had no knowledge of telegraphy but the company sent him Silas Blanchard, of DeRuyter as operator, and from him he learned the art. Mr. and Mrs. Tallett were married in 1874 and in two weeks Mrs. Tallett had learned telegraphy and in four weeks was appointed operator. 
Fuel for Wood Burners   
    One of Mr. Tallett's duties as agent was to procure the railroadπs supply of fuel for its locomotives, which were the old wood-burners. Choppers worked throughout the week on Crumb Hill, cutting the wood. Saturday afternoon a string of flat cars would be hauled to the hill for loading on Sunday when no trains were running. Mr. Tallett superintendent this job and had the loaded cars run by gravity down the grade onto the switch at his station. He recalls how a carload of sand got away on the Crumb Hill summit one day and went down the grade into DeRuyter and as far as Cuyler before it stopped. Dick Lewis made the wild ride in the car.  
    W.C. Hartigan was operator at Norwich while Mr. Tallett was at Otselic. Mr. Hartigan continued with the Midland on its main line after the Auburn branch was abandoned. He was superintendent of the Northern division thirty years, until he retired Nov. 1, 1923, after 55 years of railroading with one company. In December a party of thirty O.&W. employees went to Mr. Hartigan's home in Norwich and presented him a purse of $750 in gold.  
    When the Midland gave up the struggle with the deep snow and high trestles in 1879, Mr. Tallett went to DeRuyter and got himself a job as operator and later agent with the Utica, Ithaca & Elmira, running from Canastota to Elmira. The road from Cazenovia to DeRuyter had been built quite recently making the connecting link that completed what is now the E.&C. branch of the Lehigh Valley.  
    Mr. Tallett, speaking of the daily milk trains on today's railroads, told how dairy products used to be shipped, the butter and cheese of the farms and factories. When he began his work at the DeRuyter station, Mondays and Thursdays were the butter and cheese days, and there was from one to five carloads each shipping day.  
   The Auburn branch of the Midland was one of the few roads built among the many that were projected and for which towns were bonded. In the early seventies the trestles were built of 12 by 12 hemlock, cut from the hills nearby and only the pine had to be shipped in. Today, concrete and iron would be used, but the cost would be so great that not even the men who had the nerve to bond towns and run railroads on wooden trestles would dare venture to raise the money. 
Cortland Railroad Men   
    There are men around Cortland today who had a hand in opening that part of the railroad that runs between Cortland and DeRuyter. Dr. C. H. Webster was located at East Homer when the road was built and the contractors had their horses shod and their wagons repaired in his shop. Henry Bliss was an employee of the contractors of the railroad, and R.D. Buckingham, now running the Buckingham Hotel north of Homer, is another who worked on the road while it was being built and for it after it got started.  
    The stations on the abandoned road between DeRuyter and Norwich were Crumb Hill, Otselic, Beaver Meadow, Lower Beaver Meadow, Plymouth and Frinkville. The first and last named were flag stations; the others regular railroad towns. Stage lines were started again when the railroad quit and in the Democrat files of the weeks following are announcements that William Graham was operating a stage every other day between DeRuyter and Norwich. J. Crandall's stage made trips from Norwich to Beaver Meadow, and Simeon Crumb carried passengers, mail and freight from Beaver Meadow to South Otselic.

Cortland Democrat
March 21, 1924
  
Daring Girl Walked Midland Trestles 
                         ____
   The Democrat's story of the old Midland Railroad and its numerous trestles recalled to many of our readers, events of the seventies associated with the building of the road and its operation. None is more interesting than a letter from Mrs. Edith Cotton of Anderson, Indiana, formerly of Cortland and the town of Taylor, and in her youth a resident of DeRuyter. Mrs. Cotton's story of her adventures follows: 
   "Dear Editor - I was greatly interested in the article about the old Midland. It carried me back to the time when as a girl DeRuyter was my home. From 1865 to well into 1872, my father had a wagon shop there, and so we were there when the great railroad was built. Our home was near the road coming in from the east, and we could keep account of the trains coming in and going west. After a bad snow storm we did not see the train for days and when the road was finally broken clear, there would be two snowplows and two or three engines puffing and whistling in to let you know they had mastered the many cuts and the snow was cleaned out.   
Wibert Trestle Highest   
   "Wibert Trestle was the highest one on the road, and long. Its height was 165 feet in the highest part, that lay about two miles from Quaker Basin, just beyond was a short trestle 71 feet high. One summer I taught in the school house close to the trestle. Coming up from DeRuyter the road had a sharp curve onto the highway, and a few yards on the other side the trestle began. 
   "Some young people came one Friday night to take me home, and we walked out to it. There were three of us and, in the daring of youth, we walked across it, little realizing what we were getting into. Before half way across we wished we were back where we started. When across, we felt sure we could never return the way we came, and we looked at the steep sides of the hill, thinking to go down and cross the basin and climb the other side to the roadway. No use; we had to walk back and did so in fear and trembling, hand in hand. A short time after that there were a few white hairs on one side of my head, but whether that was the cause is not known, gray at 18 years of age! 
   "The school was four miles from DeRuyter, so being homesick, would walk home at night and back in the morning; one morning I found it had been raining, and knowing it would be muddy by road, decided to walk the railroad. I remember rightly there were seven or eight trestles from DeRuyter to the one of 71 feet previously mentioned, counting that so there were five or six to walk. There was a strong wind and when crossing the long trestle in Quaker Basin, which was in the open, had to stop often and hang to the rail to keep from being blown off. When I reached terra firma once more, another long breath was taken for my second hair-breadth escape. I was carrying a lunch basket, and a package. 
   "A Sunday school was held in the schoolhouse each week and one Sunday morning three children were coming down from Crumb Hill to attend and were about half way across when an engine coming from DeRuyter burst into view at the short curve across the road. The engine stopped as soon as possible and when at a standstill was where those children had thrown themselves down on the planks at the side of the trestle. Very likely their parents had told them to do this in case they were ever caught there.   
Trestles Became Dangerous   
   "Those wooden trestles were to have been filled in inside of five years, but they never did anything towards it that I ever heard. The last months the road was operated it was a menace to life; have heard my brother-in-law tell many a time about his going out morning after morning not knowing whether he would ever see home again; the high trestle would shake and groan when the freight train went over them, "Brownie,” as he was called on the railroad, had many escapes according to his experience. 
   "This may not interest you, but seeing your article that brought it all back to me, thought you might like to hear more about it. One time coming up from Norwich the train had to stop in a deep cut to shovel some snow out; the cut had been full from a previous severe storm, but had been cleared the width of the cars. While waiting we walked up above the cut to look down on the top of the car and it looked like flooring laid on the snow, could not see the car windows. On crumb Hill snow was always sifting when there was any." 
Editor Blanchard Helped Build Railroad 
   L.D. Blanchard, editor of the Cincinnatus Times, is one of those still living in Cortland county who had a hand in building the old Midland railroad and then helped operate it. Mr. Blanchard's note on his connection with the work follows: 
   "I read with much interest the historical sketch of the old Auburn branch of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad, in The Democrat, and am preserving the same. I well remember all the characters mentioned and was familiar with the line from Norwich to Cortland from its opening to the abandonment of that section from Norwich to DeRuyter. 
   "Your statistician, inadvertently I am sure, omitted my name in mentioning the earliest employees on the Auburn branch. My services there began as a driver of livery rigs, carrying civil engineers on construction work; drover scraper team on grading work for contractor Tom Murphy; was a boy helping with track layers from the High Bridge trestle west of DeRuyter to Cortland; telegraph operator for Station Agent George W. Blodgett at DeRuyter one year, then transferred to Cortland as operator for Agent H.R. Rouse. Later was station agent at Cook's Falls, on mainline. 
   "While at DeRuyter taught my younger brother, S.D. Blanchard, learned telegraphy. He has been for more than thirty years at the Pennsylvania Railroad station at Brockway, Pa., where he is now employed." 

Norwich Sun of Norwich, NY - Wednesday, April 2, 1924
  
C.W. Lanpher Is Taken In Death 
             ___
Former O.&W. Superintendent  Passes Away At Age of 84 Years  
             ___
  Charles W. Lanpher, former superintendent of the northern division of the New York, Ontario & Western Railroad, died at his home, 79 East Main street, at 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, aged 84 years. 
   Mr. Lanpher had been ill since last October, and gradually failed until the end came. His death removes one of the oldest residents of the city, and a man who was active in business and civic affairs until a few years ago. 
   The deceased was born in Chemung, N.Y., near Candor, Aug. 2, 1839. He was a veteran of the Civil War, entering the service in April, 1861, and serving until the close of the war. In 1864 he entered the employ of the Erie Railroad in the bridge and building department. In 1871 he was placed in charge of construction on the Mt. Clair road, a branch of the Erie. A year later Mr. Lanpher entered the employ of the New York & Oswego Midland Railroad as superintendent of bridges and buildings. 
   Mr. Lanpher entered the employ of the O.&W. Railroad in 1880 and six years later was made superintendent of the northern division of the road, a position he held until 1893 when he resigned. He then entered the coal business in this city which he continued until 1909 when he retired. 
   The deceased was a well known Norwich resident and was active and prominent in affairs of the community. He served as president of the Chenango County Agricultural Society and had held other positions of trust. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. His death leaves only one survivor of the company with which he served in the Civil War. 
   In early life Mr. Lanpher was united in marriage with Ettie Thompson of Little Valley, N.Y. To them were born four daughters, Lulu Susie and Mabel M., both of whom are dead, and Mrs. P.F. Billings of Norwich and Mrs. Mark Weston of Brooklyn. Besides the two daughters above named there survive two grandchildren, Lanpher Charles and June Esther Weston. Mrs. Lanpher died four years ago. 
  Funeral services will be held at the late home Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock with interment in Mt. Hope cemetery.

Cortland Democrat of Cortland, NY - Friday, May 2, 1924

Two Midland Excursions Recalled 
                    ____
   A story of the old Midland railroad the the Otselic Center trestle printed in The Democrat a few weeks ago has revived other stories of the old road, among the most interesting of which are the reminiscences of Mrs. Edith Cotton of Anderson, Indiana, and Curtis Kenyon of South Otselic. 
   The latter in a story printed in the DeRuyter Gleaner of March 14, 1924 tells how the trestle at the Center was called the Rainbow Trestle, a name given it by the late George Mason, who, with Albert Pritchard, another Otselic carpenter, assisted in its construction. It was an appropriate name, the writer says, for it was a rainbow chase for the taxpayers of Otselic from the time the bonds were issued in 1870 until the last were paid off in 1923. The following is quoted from Mr. Kenyon's article: 
   "We think the last trains were operated on the road in February, 1879, for we well remember going with our town collector, the late C.G. Perkins, to make a levy for taxes and I think he caused a coach to be cut out of one of the last trains. Later the tax was paid and the car released. We recall many incidents in connection with the construction and operation of the old Midland branch. The Pitcher and Pharsalia people were highly elated and were regular patrons of the road. Many of the larger farmers went out of their way to reach the Otselic station with their produce and to buy their supplies from the boy agent, M.E. Tallett. 
   "We well remember back in 1870 or '71, in company with about 20 Masons, going to the Center to take Dave Shattuck's special train from Norwich to DeRuyter, the occasion being the instituting of a new lodge at DeRuyter; on board were about 40 Sir Knights from Norwich Commandery including the prominent men of the order, like G. Gage Berry, Col. E.J. Loomis, Clark Stratton, Slater, Rider, and many others, all of whom have passed on their last pilgrimage. Upon our return about 2 a.m., we were met by a pouring rain. Not being provided with enclosed autos we went to "hay" in Chauncey Duncan's barn until daylight. Included in the Otselic delegation were several Knights including Hon. D.E. Parce, H.S. Wheeler, James Brown, E.D. Parce and Ralph Thompson. If we are not mistaken all who boarded Dave's train at that time are gone excepting Major N.W. Stoddard and the writer. 
   “The last of the old depot buildings removed was the one at the Center, which is now a part of the fine barns on Dorr Brown's farm. The one at Stanbro (which was of clear pine and heavy slate roof) had been purchased by W.L. Miller and converted into a fine barn, now owned by the Lennie Dye estate. The old franchise is still owned by the Ontario & Western R.R. Co."  
   An excursion of another kind is recalled by Mrs. Cotton, who was the "daring girl that walked the trestles", and she says that if L.D. Blanchard helped build the Midland by driving for the civil engineers, so did she by waiting on table for railroad boarders. 
   Mrs. Cotton writes: "The sad part of the opening of the Midland railroad was as follows: An excursion train was run from DeRuyter over the road to Norwich and onto the Lyon Brook bridge, which had recently been completed and was so much of a wonder that excursions a were run from all over the state. 
   "It was an iron or steel structure and much higher than the Wibert trestle. When looked from it down to the roadway I saw an ox team and the oxen looked no larger than calves. 
   "It was a beautiful sunny day, and we had an early start. There was a crowd to go and the long train came up across the street to let the people on. Everybody was happy. Paul Weed, a young brother of the village baker, had been on the train, but sold his seat and started up town, saying he would be back in time. As Utica street was on quite a steep grade the train was backed down the line some distance to get a start to make the ascent with its heavy load, and had good speed when Paul got back. 
   "He was cautioned by bystanders that it was dangerous and that he should not attempt to board the train, but he laughed and said he would make it all right. He grabbed a handrail and jumped, but the speed of the train caused a suction that drew him under the wheels and he was gathered up in pieces after that long, heavy train had passed. 
   "If any of the trainmen knew of it they kept silent for we did not hear about it until we returned that night. It was wise to keep it quiet, I suppose, for without doubt there would have been a panic, and at best it would have been an unhappy day for the excursionists. It was sad news at the end of a happy day, for Paul was known by all of the young people."

Syracuse Post-Standard
Dec. 21, 1926

Coasting Into Norwich With Four-Hundred
Cords of Wood on Rails of Old Railroad;
Horse Drawing Reconstructed Truck Back.

To the Editor of The Post-Standard :

    A little more history about Beaver Meadow and the Oswego Midland Railroad. In the year of our Lord, 1881, and after this line of road had been abandoned, I had more than 400 cords of wood banked along the siding at Beaver Meadow, which I had bought for a man from Norwich, who was backing me in the grocery trade ( I had very little capital of my own ).
    After this line had been abandoned officially, I went to him, and after a conference he renounced all responsibility and threw all the burden upon me. That meant financial ruin for me. The wood consisted of all beech, birch and maple, not less than 14 inches in length, and bought at the municifent price of $1 per cord, in trade. A portion, however, was purchased at 87 1/2 cents per cord. ( Some difference in prevailing prices at this date. The lower 87 1/2 cents per cord ) after persistent rumors about the abandonment of the railroad.
    Milo Miles, who operated the saw and planing mill, had a truck or car used during the construction of this line of road to convey dirt from the cuts and fills and there dumped. This car was constructed to run on a three-foot gauge road. It occurred to me that these axles could be lengthened to the standard gauge, which I believe to be four feet, eight and one half inches at the present time. I communicated with the Norwich Foundry corporation in respect to lengthening them ( two axles for four wheel car ).
    In the meantime I had walked over the track to Norwich, 12 miles distant, to note the condition. I had had some former instruction in railroad work. And I found that bracing some of the bridges and other places where the spring floods had washed away, it would be possible to operate a light car over the tracks to Norwich without power. Mr. Miles and I constructed a frame for a car with a capacity of 12 cords.
    In the meantime I was in correspondence with Superintendent C.W. Lamphere of the New York, Ontario & Western railroad for permission to operate this car over the road to Norwich. He informed me that it was not in his power to grant any such authority. Then I made a personal appeal for permission. He almost laughed me to scorn, and said my proposition was not feasible and extremely visionary.
    As a last resort I appealed to him to be a good Samaritan. Both of us belonged to the same fraternal order. Finally, as a last resort he said : "Your persistency has appealed to me to say : 'Go to it'. Still I have not changed my mind about the feasibility. Too visionary!"
    After the car was made ready we loaded it with 10 cords of wood and started the initial trip. I hired one Loren Hall, who was the father of a boy about 13 years old, to assist me. The first trip was most strenuous. The bearings being new, soon after leaving Beaver Meadow we discovered ( in railroad parlance ) a "hotbox". The grade permitted us to run without any propulsion.
    When we arrived at Plymouth, I went to a grocery store and procured a package of Dixon's stove polish, which is composed principally of graphite. I shaved a portion of this up and mixed it with lubricating oil. And finally we overcame the "hotbox". When we arrived within about four miles of Norwich we struck a grade nearly level, in fact, an upgrade over bridges. We arrived at Norwich, or where we crossed the highway formerly a plank road, where we dumped our load.
    When we arrived ( somewhere about the middle of September ) it was dark. Mr. Hall and myself were fagged out, and about famished for want of a good square meal. On our return to Beaver Meadow we arrived home about 10:30 p.m. The next day was a day of rest, Mr. Hall was ready to "throw up the sponge." Along toward night we loaded up with 10 cords preparatory to start at 7 a.m. the next day. Mr. H. consented to one more trial.
    It rained during the night and that left a clean rail. Soon after leaving the momentum became so great I had to apply the brake ( a lever brake with air ). We made the run in about 50 minutes and were highly elated. The inhabitants along the line were astonished. After the second trip I operated the car alone, making quite a reduction in operating expenses.
    We used a horse with a towing line and used to unhitch crossing the bridges and push the car over. I transported all the wood in this manner and then turned the car over to Milo Miles, who finally added an engine and connected to the bearings and thus operated the car for freight and express until the rails were finally removed, assisting with this car in the demolition of this line of road.
    Thus ended this branch of the old Oswego Midland Railroad.
Thurlow W. Johnson, Syracuse*
_______
*Johnson committed suicide by hanging himself in the cellar of his home at 714 S. Beech St., Syracuse, on March 26, 1928. According to his obituary in the Post-Standard of March 27, 1928, he had been unaccountably obsessed over his financial situation. He was a retired mail clerk for the New York Central Railroad. He was survived by his wife, Cora, and a sister, Mrs. Ida Hiler.

DeRuyter Gleaner
Sept. 1, 1927

                               When I Was A Boy
                                        ___
                                The Old Midland
   When I was a boy the old Midland Railroad was just finishing up its useful career. There is very little evidence of this important factor in the upbuilding of DeRuyter as a shipping center. My earliest recollections date back to the time when trains were running.    
    I cannot say that the service was regular but there was service. Then came a time when an engine pushed some flat cars up the road toward Crumb and Muller Hills, and when it came back the cars were laden with rails. This was don as far as Charles Maxon's house leaving the balance of the old Midland for use as a switch. The trestles remained many years as grim monuments of the service which the old Midland had rendered an otherwise isolated section.
   There are many still remaining who will remember back to the time when a brother of "Billy" Weed was killed while trying to board an excursion train at the Utica street crossing.
  The building of the railroad from DeRuyter to Canastota was the real cause of the passing of the Midland. The old railroad served its purpose. It put DeRuyter in touch with the outside world just at time when the need was greatest.
   The rolling stock has been removed, the rails have been taken away and the trestles and ties have gone to decay. The trail that was built into the solid earth still remains to tell future generations of the efforts to make DeRuyter a permanent community. 
                     L.F.R.

Cortland Standard
Thurs., Nov. 17, 1927

Early Days of Railroad In Cortland and Chenango Are Recalled by Survivors  
                            ___
Building, Operation and Abandonment of the Old Midland Described by John C. Kelley, Brakeman in 1872 and '73    

   Days when "railroading was railroad", on the old Midland Railroad between DeRuyter and Norwich, now but a memory, and of the building of the Cincinnatus branch of the Lackawanna, have been brought to light through a small news item which recently appeared in different papers.  
   The little item which stirred up the tales of the old wood burning and hand brake days referred to the sale which was held in DeRuyter, June 11, of bonds amounting to $21,000 to refund outstanding bonds issued to aid in the construction of the old Oswego Midland Railroad, defunct for a half century.  
   Few people are to be found who remember much of the history of the road, but here and there may be found a gray haired individual who recalls incidents of interest. In this group is John C. Kelley, 4 Maple Ave., who worked for several years on the old Midland, and recalls several dramatic incidents of the old days.  
   Kelley took part in the building of the road in the years 1868-69 and later worked as a brakeman in '72 and '73. The section between Norwich and DeRuyter was abandoned in 1879 due to the high cost of keeping the road bed in repair and the lack of business, other lines having come into the territory and taken the traffic. 
DeRuyter Bonded for $150,000   
   DeRuyter was at that time bonded for $150,000 and when the road went defunct bonds were issued for an additional sum of $10,000 to fight the payment of the first figure. Otselic, Plymouth, Pitcher were among the towns to issue bonds to promote the road and Lincklaen, although not on the route, got in on the proposition to aid in the construction of the road.  
   The whole thing started when the late D.C. Littlejohn, then of Oswego, said that he could build a railroad from Oswego to New York without a dollar of capital. And he did. The New York, Ontario & Western railroad is the monument to the enterprise of the people of Central New York who wanted to develop their section through the building of a railroad.  
   But the plan grew. In the early dream for a gigantic network of railroads, it was planned to run a road from Norwich to Auburn and the Auburn branch of the New York and Oswego Midland was started. The branch never got any farther than Cortland, and then what is now the Lehigh Valley, built a line from Freeville to Auburn and the plan was abandoned. In 1906 the idea of a Cortland-Auburn railroad was again revived, but after the route had been surveyed, the plan was given up.  
   But to get back to the early history of the Midland. J.W. Merchant, then of DeRuyter, was the man who had the most to do with the laying out of the route. Merchant was interested in the road and he was also interested in a large tract of timber on Crumb Hill, east of DeRuyter. Wood was burned in those days in the locomotives, and Merchant saw a market for his timber. It was largely through his influence that after surveying several different routes, the road was finally laid out through the towns of Norwich, Plymouth, Otselic and DeRuyter, with stations at Norwich, Plymouth, Ireland Mills, Lower Beaver Meadow, Otselic Center, Crumb Hill (a flag station), and DeRuyter. 
Wooden Trestles   
   The construction over this route required many long trestles, and all of these, in those days, were of wood construction. Mr. Kelley tells of the old Lyon Brook bridge near Oxford Summit on the main line, which was 165 feet high. Trains had orders not to cross that bridge faster than a man could walk, and to conform with this rule, a brakeman was always sent across on foot in front of the locomotive.  
   Needless to say, these trestles soon began to wear out and this was one of the features which brought about the abandonment of the road after 10 years of operation. From DeRuyter, the road, which has since been taken over by the Lehigh Valley, came to Cortland. Homer was the only town along the route that would not bond for the construction, but despite this fact the road was put through the eastern end of the township.  
   "I can remember the first train that was run this side of DeRuyter", said Mr. Kelley, in recounting some of the incidents of the early days of railroading. "They were laying the roadbed down past the old Countryman place, later known as the John Boyce farm. Mrs. Countryman had never seen a train and came out on the knoll to watch the locomotive which was following the iron down as fast as it was laid. The engineer blew a sharp blast on the whistle and Mrs. Countryman dropped dead. Tom Lynch, who is now a conductor on the Lehigh, was a brakeman on the work train."  
   We would make up of a lunch, because it would take all day to get back to Norwich." 
Wood Burning Engines   
   "We used to wood the engine here and again at DeRuyter so that we would be able to get through to Norwich. In those days a brakeman couldn't sit in the caboose all the time. Most of the time he had to be up by his brakes because there was no air then and when one of those old coupling pins would snap, the brakes had to be put on by hand or the cars would run away. I saw three carloads of wood get away on Crumb Hill one time and run the seven miles down into DeRuyter and then they pretty nearly made the grade and came over to Cortland. No, the brakeman didn't get hurt but he had a wild ride.  
   "I saw 10,000 cords of four foot wood, which had been stacked beside the tracks, burn one time. It was set afire by a locomotive. They used to stack the wood on Crumb Hill beside the tracks and then we would load it into cars and take it to the stations where the engines took on wood. I'd like to see some of these firemen now keep an engine going with wood on those grades", he added reminiscently.  
   "Things are a lot different now", he concluded. "They have a tunnel through the mountain at Hancock instead of going over the top of it. The old Chenango canal swing bridge in Norwich is gone and the wooden trestles are replaced by steel so that the trains don't have to to slow down for anything any more. But if you want to see where the old Midland railroad was", he added, "just drive over to DeRuyter some time and then follow the state road down through Otselic Center and over toward Norwich. You can see the old roadbed but all the iron is gone and the trestles have gone down."

Norwich Sun
December 6, 1930

Old Rights of Way on Auburn Branch are Being Sold
to Adjacent Land Owners
   H.A. Marsden of Middletown, claim agent for the New York, Ontario and Western Railway, and D.W. Fagley of this city, assistant engineer for the company, have been engaged for several months in the work of disposing of the old rights of way of the Auburn branch, and it has been announced that they had nearly completed their work.
    It has been a stupendous task for the rights of way extended from this city of Norwich to the village of DeRuyter, and involved many weeks of search through the records of the company, and in the county clerks officers both in Norwich and Wampsville, the county seat of Madison county.
When all searches have been made, a total of 113 deeds will be passed involving strips of land ranging in width from 66 to 100 feet, and the price received by the company for these strips range from $2 to $250. 
    Here in the city of Norwich the old right of way which has been sold, extends fro the tracks of the Lackawanna railroad from a point just north of Mitchell street viaduct in a northwesterly direction, crossing North Broad street south of the residences of Homer H. Higley and Frank Zuber, and continuing west across Miller street. The roadbed of the old railroad is what is now Auburn street, and the lower end of Pleasant street and follows west of what is now Plymouth street to the city line.
    Deeds including purchases of city lands have not been passed, but it is expected that all will be in the hands of the purchasers before the end of the year. Mr. Marsden stated to a representative of this newspaper that the deeds which conveyed the various properties to the company were dated 1870 and 1871.
    It is a matter of record that a very small proportion of the original owners oft he right of
way are now living, and hardly an instance has occurred where the rights of way have been repurchased by any of the descendants of the original sellers. This condition is because of changing hands of the property through the old right of way, and removals and deaths.
   The company will retain the present spur of track and right of way in this city which crosses Silver street just south of the store of Paul Welch and extends west crossing the Ireland Machine and Foundry and Norwich Wire Works plants.
    At the time the road was built it crossed the old Chenango Canal which is now State street on a high trestle and which extended to the higher ground south of the residence of Frank Zuber.

From the Henry Breed's Pioneer History of Quaker Basin © DeRuyter, NY, 1931, Page 7

I think it proper to give you a short history of the railroad which once ran on the north side of our beautiful valley, known at the time as the Auburn Branch of the New York and   Oswego Midland Railroad. In the year 1869, on Tuesday, 15th of June, a celebration was held at the summit of Crumb Hill, on Benjamin Crumb's farm, and ground broken for the commencement of that great thoroughfare. Lambert B. Kern delivered an oration which as fitting to the occasion. I cannot say that the railroad that I am speaking of, was of any benefit to the inhabitants of this vicinity, or the town of DeRuyter.  
Very much of our forests, which was valuable timber was going into the trestle works, which had to be built in order to get over Crumb Hill. The bed of the old road will be visited to the rising generations if they ever travel on it on it, they will see at once that the cost must have been great in constructing it and the generations yet to come may possibly have a hand in it yet, in helping pay the debt which was saddled onto the inhabitants of the town to aid in its construction. This railroad did business not far from 10 years.
In 1870, or about then, a steam mill was built up near the old railroad to saw timber for the trestle that was built there which was about 80 feet high and quite lengthy. A tram road was built up the gulf to run the logs down on cars to the mill; there was also a boarding house built there in which Lorenzo Van Horn’s folks lived in them days.


Waterville Times
December 3, 1931

Deserted Village in Madison County
                 _____
Hamlet of Fifteen Houses Now Eery Place - 
Surrounded by Forest on High Land of Georgetown -
Norwich-DeRuyter Railroad Recalled
                  ____
    Did you know that there is in Madison county a deserted village, a settlement in which today there resides not a soul? Yes, it was in reality a village or settlement, a collection of 15 houses, but with no commercial buildings. It was not a logging camp or other specially constructed settlement, but a hamlet that grew up naturally. And i what a location.
    The settlement was in the Crumb Hill section of Georgetown and went by the euphonious name of Lazyville. It was on one of the highest points of the town and is completely surrounded by forest. As one drives through Georgetown toward South Otselic there is a road just west of the village that least to the Muller Hill section. Take this road and drive along for about a mile when a fork in the road will be noticed. Take the left-hand fork and go as far as you can proceed. It isn't much of a road after you leave the forks, and finally you will find that an auto can go no further. From there on it is a hike of about a mile to reach Lazyville. And when you get there you will find little.
    There are three frame houses, several slab-sided houses and one or two log cabins. Several of the buildings have tumbled down and all present a woe-begone condition. Until about a year ago a man elided thee, but he was overcome by lonesomeness and moved to Georgetown.
    Jerome Brown is believed to have been the first settler of Lazyville. He made a clearing in the forest and built a home. He had several sons and each built a home. Others came and built here, the Davenports, Shermans, etc. Today all are gone.
    The only industry that graced Lazyville (Jerome Brown is also credited with naming the hamlet) was a sawmill. This was put in operation by Rat. Merchant at the time the Norwich-DeRuyter Branch of the Midland Railroad was built.
    And that brings up another question: How many know that at one time there was a railroad between Norwich and DeRuyter? Few living today know of this and those who knew have almost forgotten it. The road went right through Crumb Hill in Georgetown and down into DeRuyter.  The grades were excessive and an engine could pull only a small train over the road. In many places there were long and high trestles, and it was quite a stunt for the boys of the section to walk across these trestles.
    Frank Stone of Brander Hollow recalls a Sunday School excursion that was run over the road from Norwich to Ithaca. The train had seven or eight coaches and each was packed to capacity. The trip to Ithaca was made, right but on the return home the engine could not pull the train up the grade from Quaker Basin to the crest of Crumb Hill. The train stalled, back down and tried it again. This was repeated several times, and finally they back down into DeRuyter and waited for another engine to come from Cortland to boost them over the grade.  Many were late in doing their evening chores that day.
    The railroad was operated only a short time and proved too expensive to operate for the returns received,  and it was finally abandoned. The roadbed and grade are still plainly seen but the rails and ties were removed long ago.
                                (Oneida Democratic-Union)



Rainbow Trestle at Otselic Center